Latest imported news items on Restafy Latest imported news items on Restafy https://www.restafy.com/ 2019-11-18T14:37:23+00:00 WP RSS Aggregator https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/327026.php The link between insomnia and cardiovascular disease 2019-11-16T05:00:00.000-06:00 Insomnia symptoms make a person more likely to develop stroke, heart attack, and similar diseases, finds an extensive Chinese study. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz200/5626508?rss=1 Objectively measured sleep and telomere length in a population-based cohort of children and midlife adults 2019-11-15T18:00:00.000-06:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesPoor sleep patterns in older adults are associated with chromosomal telomere shortening, a marker of cellular senescence. However, studies have relied on self-reported sleep characteristics, with few data for younger individuals. We investigated whether sleep measured via actigraphy was cross-sectionally associated with telomere length in children and midlife adults.MethodsA population-based sample of 1874 11–12 year olds and midlife adults (mean age 44 years, SD 5.1) had biological and physical assessments at centers across Australia in 2015–2016. Sleep characteristics, including duration, onset, offset, day-to-day variability, and efficiency, were derived from actigraphy. Relative telomere length (T/S ratio) was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA from peripheral blood. Multivariable regression models estimated associations, adjusting for prespecified confounders.ResultsBoth sleep and telomere data were available for 728 children and 1070 adults. Mean (SD) T/S ratio was 1.09 (0.55) in children and 0.81 (0.38) in adults. T/S ratio was not predicted by sleep duration (β 0.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.02 to 0.09, p = .16, children; β −0.004, 95% CI −0.03 to 0.02, p = .70, adults) or most other sleep metrics. The only exception was a weak association between later sleep timing (the midpoint of sleep onset and offset) and longer telomeres in adults (β 0.03, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.06, p = .01).ConclusionsObjective sleep characteristics show no convincing associations with telomere length in two largely healthy populations up to at least midlife. Sleep–telomere associations may be a late-life occurrence or may present only with a trigger such as presence of other morbidities.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Poor sleep patterns in older adults are associated with chromosomal telomere shortening, a marker of cellular senescence. However, studies have relied on self-reported sleep characteristics, with few data for younger individuals. We investigated whether sleep measured via actigraphy was cross-sectionally associated with telomere length in children and midlife adults.
Methods
A population-based sample of 1874 11–12 year olds and midlife adults (mean age 44 years, SD 5.1) had biological and physical assessments at centers across Australia in 2015–2016. Sleep characteristics, including duration, onset, offset, day-to-day variability, and efficiency, were derived from actigraphy. Relative telomere length (T/S ratio) was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA from peripheral blood. Multivariable regression models estimated associations, adjusting for prespecified confounders.
Results
Both sleep and telomere data were available for 728 children and 1070 adults. Mean (SD) T/S ratio was 1.09 (0.55) in children and 0.81 (0.38) in adults. T/S ratio was not predicted by sleep duration (β 0.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.02 to 0.09, p = .16, children; β −0.004, 95% CI −0.03 to 0.02, p = .70, adults) or most other sleep metrics. The only exception was a weak association between later sleep timing (the midpoint of sleep onset and offset) and longer telomeres in adults (β 0.03, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.06, p = .01).
Conclusions
Objective sleep characteristics show no convincing associations with telomere length in two largely healthy populations up to at least midlife. Sleep–telomere associations may be a late-life occurrence or may present only with a trigger such as presence of other morbidities.]]>
Oxford Academic - Advanced Access
https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/srs-2020-outstanding-early-investigator-award/ SRS 2020 Outstanding Early Investigator Award 2019-11-15T10:17:15.000-06:00 The award cycle for the 2020 Outstanding Early Investigator Award is open through January 26, 2020, 11:59 PM, CT This award recognizes an outstanding research effort by an early-stage investigator in the field of sleep research. The basis for evaluation of a candidate is a single, peer-reviewed publication reporting original research (not a review), supported [...] The post SRS 2020 Outstanding Early Investigator Award appeared first on Sleep Research Society. The award cycle for the 2020 Outstanding Early Investigator Award is open through January 26, 2020, 11:59 PM, CT

This award recognizes an outstanding research effort by an early-stage investigator in the field of sleep research. The basis for evaluation of a candidate is a single, peer-reviewed publication reporting original research (not a review), supported by a senior investigator’s letter of recommendation that must address specific elements described below. The candidate must be the first author; and the article must be published or accepted for publication in 2019.

The award consists of a plaque and a travel honorarium to be applied toward travel to SLEEP, the Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies. The plaque and honorarium will be presented at SLEEP 2020, during the SRS Club Hypnos Reception, Sunday evening in Philadelphia, PA.

Full details are available on the award webpage.

The post SRS 2020 Outstanding Early Investigator Award appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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lynn Sleep Research Society
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/sleep-deprived-doctors-police-officers-study/ Feeling Sleep Deprived? Doctors and Police Officers Are Too, Study Says 2019-11-15T09:16:50.000-06:00 About one-third of Americans are sleeping less than seven hours a night – and some of the people most affected could be the ones responsible for your safety. Among working American adults, health and safety professionals reported the highest rates of insufficient sleep, according to new research.

About one-third of Americans are sleeping less than seven hours a night – and some of the people most affected could be the ones responsible for your safety. Among working American adults, health and safety professionals reported the highest rates of insufficient sleep, according to new research.

The study, funded by pharmaceutical company Merck, analyzed self-reported data from the National Health Interview Survey for more than 150,000 people across the nation over the course of nine years. Researchers found that the percentage of working Americans getting short sleep is on the rise – from 30.9% in 2010 to 35.6% in 2018.

Among Americans working in protective service and military, about half reported short sleep in 2018, followed by 45% in health care support occupations.

It “is disconcerting because many of these occupations are related to population health, well-being and safety services,” the researchers wrote.

Get the full story at www.usatoday.com

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Lisa Spear Sleep Review
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/employers-sleep-hygiene/ Why Good Employers Want You to Put Down the Phone and Get More Sleep 2019-11-15T09:07:26.000-06:00 The Boston Globe reports that more companies are recognizing the importance of having a well-rested team. Some are even hosting seminars so their staff members can learn about sleep hygiene.

The Boston Globe reports that more companies are recognizing the importance of having a well-rested team. Some are even hosting seminars so their staff members can learn about sleep hygiene.

More than a third of American adults fail to regularly get at least seven hours of shut-eye. In an always-on culture where employees sleep with their phones, fatigue is the new normal.

Companies, aware that sleep deprivation costs the US economy more than $400 billion each year in lost productivity, are trying to change that, says Debra Wein, CEO and founder of Wellness Workdays, a Hingham company whose offerings include sleep quality assessment programs.

She says her company, which has worked with Columbia Construction and Cape Cod Healthcare, has seen a jump in requests for sleep-related seminars and workshops in the last two years. “Companies are realizing that sleep is a key issue for employee mood, productivity, memory, and engagement, especially as technology and greater demands make it harder to break away,” Wein says.

Get the full story at bostonglobe.com.

 

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Lisa Spear Sleep Review
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/sleep-apnea-tired-mask-cpap/ ‘Sleep Apnea Means I Feel Tired All the Time. Is This Terrifying Mask The Only Answer?’ 2019-11-15T08:59:28.000-06:00 An opinion writer for The Guardian describes his experience with sleep apnea and trying to use a CPAP mask.

An opinion writer for The Guardian describes his experience with sleep apnea and trying to use a CPAP mask.

I was sent home with a device to which my chest and finger were tethered for two consecutive nights. The data thus harvested was sent back to the clinic and I awaited the firm diagnosis, that I was by now hoping for. I take medication for hypertension, reflux and couple of mental health issues and the sleep man had said apnea was probably at the root of all of these.

I have been using my CPAP for two weeks now. I fall asleep quite overwhelmed with serenity. Then at some point, two or three hours later, I awake in a panic, tear the mask off and go back to a troubled sleep. And that’s all I have to report at this stage.

Get the full story at www.theguardian.com

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Lisa Spear Sleep Review
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31699 Reevaluating Norms for Childhood Obstructive Sleep Apnea 2019-11-15T08:54:24.000-06:00 Brooks DM, Brooks LJ. Reevaluating norms for childhood obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1557–1558.

Brooks DM, Brooks LJ. Reevaluating norms for childhood obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1557–1558.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31714 Chronic Opioid Therapy and Sleep: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement 2019-11-15T08:54:23.000-06:00 There is a complex relationship among opioids, sleep and daytime function. Patients and medical providers should be aware that chronic opioid therapy can alter sleep architecture and sleep quality as well as contribute to daytime sleepiness. It is also important for medical providers to be cognizant of other adverse effects of chronic opioid use including the impact on respiratory function during sleep. Opioids are associated with several types of sleep-disordered breathing, including sleep-related hypoventilation, central sleep apnea (CSA), and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Appropriate screening, diagnostic testing, and treatment of opioid-associated sleep-disordered breathing can improve patients’ health and quality of life. Collaboration among medical providers is encouraged to provide high quality, patient-centered care for people who are treated with chronic opioid therapy.

There is a complex relationship among opioids, sleep and daytime function. Patients and medical providers should be aware that chronic opioid therapy can alter sleep architecture and sleep quality as well as contribute to daytime sleepiness. It is also important for medical providers to be cognizant of other adverse effects of chronic opioid use including the impact on respiratory function during sleep. Opioids are associated with several types of sleep-disordered breathing, including sleep-related hypoventilation, central sleep apnea (CSA), and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Appropriate screening, diagnostic testing, and treatment of opioid-associated sleep-disordered breathing can improve patients’ health and quality of life. Collaboration among medical providers is encouraged to provide high quality, patient-centered care for people who are treated with chronic opioid therapy.

Citation:

Rosen IM, Aurora RN, Kirsch DB, Carden KA, Malhotra RK, Ramar K, Abbasi-Feinberg F, Kristo DA, Martin JL, Olson EJ, Rosen CL, Rowley JA, Shelgikar AV; American Academy of Sleep Medicine Board of Directors. Chronic opioid therapy and sleep: an American Academy of Sleep Medicine position statement. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1671–1673.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31726 Utility Encompasses Both Clinical Translation and Ecologic Validity 2019-11-15T08:54:22.000-06:00 Schade MM, Montgomery-Downs HE. Utility encompasses both clinical translation and ecologic validity. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1709.

Schade MM, Montgomery-Downs HE. Utility encompasses both clinical translation and ecologic validity. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1709.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31725 Non-Contact Sensors: Need for Optimum Information Is More Important Than Convenience 2019-11-15T08:54:21.000-06:00 Hunasikatti M. Non-contact sensors: need for optimum information is more important than convenience. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1707.

Hunasikatti M. Non-contact sensors: need for optimum information is more important than convenience. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1707.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31724 Every Patient With Acute Ischemic Stroke Should Be Screened for Sleep-Disordered Breathing 2019-11-15T08:54:20.000-06:00 Benbir Senel G, Karadeniz D. Every patient with acute ischemic stroke should be screened for sleep-disordered breathing. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1705–1706.

Benbir Senel G, Karadeniz D. Every patient with acute ischemic stroke should be screened for sleep-disordered breathing. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1705–1706.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31723 Hashimoto Thyroiditis as a Cause or Consequence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea 2019-11-15T08:54:19.000-06:00 Xerfan EMS, Facina AS, Andersen ML, Tufik S, Tomimori J. Hashimoto thyroiditis as a cause or consequence of obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1703.

Xerfan EMS, Facina AS, Andersen ML, Tufik S, Tomimori J. Hashimoto thyroiditis as a cause or consequence of obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1703.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31721 Serum Ferritin in the Pediatric Sleep Clinic: What’s Normal Anyway? 2019-11-15T08:54:18.000-06:00 Ingram DG, Al-Shawwa B. Serum ferritin in the pediatric sleep clinic: what’s normal anyway? J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1699–1700.

Ingram DG, Al-Shawwa B. Serum ferritin in the pediatric sleep clinic: what’s normal anyway? J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1699–1700.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31722 Understanding the Questions Parents Are Asking 2019-11-15T08:54:18.000-06:00 Barnes T, Rosen GM. Understanding the questions parents are asking. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1701.

Barnes T, Rosen GM. Understanding the questions parents are asking. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1701.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31720 Author Response 2019-11-15T08:54:17.000-06:00 Chuang L-P, Lin S-W, Chen N-H. Author response. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1697–1698.

Chuang L-P, Lin S-W, Chen N-H. Author response. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1697–1698.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31719 Burden of Nocturnal Hypoxia and Type of Positive Airway Pressure Therapy May Influence Markers of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea 2019-11-15T08:54:16.000-06:00 Voulgaris A, Nena E, Steiropoulos P. Burden of nocturnal hypoxia and type of positive airway pressure therapy may influence markers of acute kidney injury in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1695.

Voulgaris A, Nena E, Steiropoulos P. Burden of nocturnal hypoxia and type of positive airway pressure therapy may influence markers of acute kidney injury in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(11):1695.

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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/jazz-pharmas-narcolepsy-osa-sleep-disorder-drug-european-panel-backing/ Jazz Pharma’s Sleep Disorder Drug Gets European Panel Backing 2019-11-15T08:35:07.000-06:00 Solriamfetol, which will be branded as Sunosi, has been backed for the treatment of excessive sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to a  statement from the European Medicines Agency's human medicines committee (CHMP).

Solriamfetol, which will be branded as Sunosi, has been backed for the treatment of excessive sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to a  statement from the European Medicines Agency’s human medicines committee (CHMP).

The drug was approved in the United States earlier this year and is part of the company’s attempts to reduce its reliance on its blockbuster narcolepsy drug, Xyrem, which faced a setback last year.

While final approvals are done by the European Commission, it generally follows the panel’s recommendation and announces its decision within a couple of months.

Get the full story at www.reuters.com

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Lisa Spear Sleep Review
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/earthquake-brain-wave-healthy-sleep/ Earthquake-like Brainwave Bursts Found to be Essential for Healthy Sleep 2019-11-15T08:24:25.000-06:00 New research in rats shows that cortical arousals and brief awakenings during sleep exhibit non-equilibrium dynamics and complex organization across time scales necessary for spontaneous sleep-stage transitions and for maintaining healthy sleep.

New research in rats shows that cortical arousals and brief awakenings during sleep exhibit non-equilibrium dynamics and complex organization across time scales necessary for spontaneous sleep-stage transitions and for maintaining healthy sleep.

Prof. Plamen Ch. Ivanov of Boston University and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

Sleep is traditionally considered to be a homeostatic process that resists deviation from equilibrium. In that regard, brief episodes of waking are viewed as perturbations that lead to sleep fragmentation and related sleep disorders. While addressing aspects of sleep regulation related to consolidated sleep and wake and the sleep-wake cycle, the homeostatic paradigm does not account for the dozens of abrupt sleep-stage transitions and micro-states within sleep stages throughout the night. Ivanov and colleagues hypothesized that, while sleep is indeed homeostatic at time scales of hours and days, non-equilibrium dynamics and criticality underlie sleep micro-architecture at shorter time scales.

To test this hypothesis, the researchers collected electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings of brain activity over multiple days in normal rats and in rats with injuries to the parafacial zone, a brain region that helps regulate sleep. They analyzed the bursting dynamics of brain activity patterns known as theta waves and delta waves, which are seen in both sleeping rats and humans.

Get the full story at sciencedaily.com. 

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Lisa Spear Sleep Review
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/fewer-students-tardy-morning-bell-rings-later-affton-schools/ Fewer Students Are Tardy as Morning Bell Rings Later in Affton Schools 2019-11-15T02:46:54.000-06:00 After a school district changed its start time to 8 am, from 7:10 am, students are more engaged, reports the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

After a school district changed its start time to 8 am, from 7:10 am, students are more engaged, reports the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

But not everyone is thrilled with the new schedule.

“I’m not a big fan of it. I like getting up earlier,” said Kaitlyn Lanemann, 12.

Last year when she was a sixth grader, school got out at 1:55 p.m. and Kaitlyn was home by 3 p.m. after extracurricular activities. Now she finishes up at 4 p.m., leaving less time for homework, especially when the St. Louis Blues are on television, she said.

Get the full story at stltoday.com

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Sree Roy Sleep Review
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/1-to-2-naps-a-week-may-help-keep-your-heart-healthy-study-finds/ 1 to 2 Naps a Week May Help Keep Your Heart Healthy, Study Finds 2019-11-15T02:42:22.000-06:00 How many naps is the healthiest amount? NBC News discusses.

How many naps is the healthiest amount? NBC News discusses.

“We looked at healthy adults and found that people who take occasional naps — once or twice a week — had a lower risk for cardiovascular disease compared to people who were not napping at all,” said Nadine Häusler, an internist at University Hospital of Lausanne, and lead author of the new research.

Get the full story at www.nbcnews.com

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Sree Roy Sleep Review
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/another-tesla-driver-apparently-fell-asleep-heres-what-tesla-could-do/ Another Tesla Driver Apparently Fell Asleep—Here’s What Tesla Could Do 2019-11-15T02:39:18.000-06:00 Ars Technica makes the case that Tesla needs a better monitoring system.

Ars Technica makes the case that Tesla needs a better monitoring system.

Currently, Tesla checks for driver engagement by measuring torque on the steering wheel. “At highway speeds, drivers typically receive warnings every 30 seconds or less if their hands aren’t detected on the wheel,” Tesla’s statement noted. If warnings are ignored, the car eventually comes to a stop.

Get the full story at arstechnica.com

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Sree Roy Sleep Review
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/poor-communication-during-referral-leads-to-serious-repercussions/ Poor Communication During Referral Leads to Serious Repercussions 2019-11-15T02:35:44.000-06:00 A lawyer tells MPR about a case in which communication and care coordination between a psychiatrist and a sleep specialist ended with the initial referral and was linked to a tragic outcome.

A lawyer tells MPR about a case in which communication and care coordination between a psychiatrist and a sleep specialist ended with the initial referral and was linked to a tragic outcome.

In this case, the referring physician was Dr P, a psychiatrist. He had been treating the patient, Ms W, 38, for about a decade following two suicide attempts in her late 20’s. Ms W was being treated for depression, and was taking lorazepam and citalopram. For several months, Ms W had been complaining to Dr P about sleep issues, including difficulty sleeping and restless legs syndrome.

Get the full story at www.empr.com

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Sree Roy Sleep Review
http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/11/cpap-diet/ The CPAP Diet 2019-11-15T02:19:46.000-06:00 A CPAP user tells The Independent about how aerophagia (for which he still seeks a solution) caused him to lose weight.

A CPAP user tells The Independent about how aerophagia (for which he still seeks a solution) caused him to lose weight.

About 10 days after I began using the machine, I began to notice an abdominal discomfort. At first, I thought it might be mild food contamination and hence reduced my food intake and shunned spicy items.

Get the full story at independentnews.com

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Sree Roy Sleep Review
https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30218-9/fulltext?rss=yes Facets of personality related to sleep habits in Black adults 2019-11-14T18:00:00.000-06:00 The objective of this study is to explore the relationship between personality traits and sleep in community-dwelling older Blacks, and to examine whether conscientiousness moderates relationships between neuroticism and sleep (quality and duration) within this cohort. Alyssa A. Gamaldo, Angie L. Sardina, Angelina Sutin, Tiana E. Cruz, Rachel Marie E. Salas, Charlene E. Gamaldo, Orfeu M. Buxton, Ross Andel Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30215-3/fulltext?rss=yes Self-reported sleep duration is associated with time in work physical activity but not transportation or leisure physical activity among Hispanic/Latino adults in the U.S.: results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos 2019-11-14T18:00:00.000-06:00 The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that short sleep duration is associated with fewer minutes of transportation, work, and leisure physical activity (PA). Sarah E. Tom, Jessica P. Brown, M. Larissa Avilés -Santa, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Sheila F. Castañeda, Sanjay R. Patel, Krista Perreira, Lisa A.P. Sanchez-Johnsen, Neomi A. Shah, Phyllis C. Zee, Susan Redline Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30188-3/fulltext?rss=yes Individuals' perceptions of social support from family and friends are associated with lower risk of sleep complaints and short sleep duration 2019-11-14T18:00:00.000-06:00 To examine whether individuals' perceptions of social support (SS) from partners, other family members, and friends are associated with risk of sleep complaints and short sleep duration. Arthur E. Mesas, Paul E. Peppard, Lauren Hale, Elliot M. Friedman, F. Javier Nieto, Erika W. Hagen Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30181-0/fulltext?rss=yes A systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence of sleep problems in children with cerebral palsy: how do children with cerebral palsy differ from each other and from typically developing children? 2019-11-14T18:00:00.000-06:00 Up to 85% of children with neurodevelopmental disorders have sleep problems, compared with 25% of typically developing children. Children with cerebral palsy (CP)may have risk factors (brain injury, physical disability, and comorbidities) that make them more likely to have sleep problems compared with typically developing children. Linda Horwood, Patricia Li, Elise Mok, Michael Shevell, Evelyn Constantin Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191114141237.htm Earthquake-like brain-wave bursts found to be essential for healthy sleep 2019-11-14T13:12:37.000-06:00 New research in rats shows that cortical arousals and brief awakenings during sleep exhibit non-equilibrium dynamics and complex organization across time scales necessary for spontaneous sleep-stage transitions and for maintaining healthy sleep. ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191114141237.htm Earthquake-like brain-wave bursts found to be essential for healthy sleep 2019-11-14T13:12:37.000-06:00 New research in rats shows that cortical arousals and brief awakenings during sleep exhibit non-equilibrium dynamics and complex organization across time scales necessary for spontaneous sleep-stage transitions and for maintaining healthy sleep. Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191114141237.htm Earthquake-like brain-wave bursts found to be essential for healthy sleep 2019-11-14T13:12:37.000-06:00 New research in rats shows that cortical arousals and brief awakenings during sleep exhibit non-equilibrium dynamics and complex organization across time scales necessary for spontaneous sleep-stage transitions and for maintaining healthy sleep. Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191114141237.htm Earthquake-like brain-wave bursts found to be essential for healthy sleep 2019-11-14T13:12:37.000-06:00 New research in rats shows that cortical arousals and brief awakenings during sleep exhibit non-equilibrium dynamics and complex organization across time scales necessary for spontaneous sleep-stage transitions and for maintaining healthy sleep. Science Daily - Insomnia https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12943?af=R Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in obstructive sleep apnea patients: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long‐term Efficacy Study (APPLES) 2019-11-14T06:48:15.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, EarlyView. Summary

Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with hypertension, and short‐term studies have demonstrated a modest reduction in blood pressure with continuous positive airway pressure therapy. We evaluated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure versus sham continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in 1,101 participants with obstructive sleep apnea from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long‐term Efficacy Study, a randomized, sham‐controlled double‐blinded study designed to assess the impact of continuous positive airway pressure on neurocognition. Participants with apnea−hypopnea index ≥ 10 were randomly assigned to continuous positive airway pressure or sham continuous positive airway pressure. Blood pressures measured in the morning and evening at baseline, 2 months and 6 months were analysed post hoc using a mixed‐model repeated‐measures analysis of variance. The largest magnitude reduction was approximately 2.4 mmHg in morning systolic pressure that occurred at 2 months in the continuous positive airway pressure arm as compared with an approximate 0.5 mmHg reduction in the sham group (continuous positive airway pressure effect −1.9 mmHg, p = .008). At 6 months, the difference between groups was diminished and no longer statistically significant (continuous positive airway pressure effect −0.9 mmHg, p = .12). Sensitivity analysis with use of multiple imputation approaches to account for missing data did not change the results. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea reduces morning but not evening blood pressure in a population with well‐controlled blood pressure. The effect was greater after 2 than after 6 months of treatment.

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Sogol Javaheri, Daniel J. Gottlieb, Stuart F. Quan Journal of Sleep Research
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12947?af=R Serotonergic system may be involved in alterations of sleep homeostasis in spontaneously hypertensive rats 2019-11-14T05:34:04.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, EarlyView. Summary

Hypertension is associated with sleep disorders. Spontaneously hypertensive rats are derived from Wistar‐Kyoto rats and widely used in research on hypertension. The present study investigated the propensity to sleep and electroencephalographic spectrum changes over 24 hr in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and proposed the involvement of the serotonergic system in these alterations. Time‐course analysis showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats exhibit hyperarousal during the light phase but hypersomnia during the dark phase. Spontaneously hypertensive rats also exhibited less slight fluctuation in electroencephalographic delta power density over 24 hr as compared with Wistar‐Kyoto rats, suggesting that the accumulation or elimination of sleep pressure was disrupted. Sleep deprivation disrupted the regulation of sleep homeostasis in spontaneously hypertensive rats, reflected by less sleep time and poor sleep quality during the recovery period. The density and activity of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus were higher in spontaneously hypertensive rats compared with Wistar‐Kyoto rats. Interestingly, we observed the absence of fluctuations in 5‐hydroxytryptamine and 5‐hydroxyindoleacetic acid across the sleep, wake, sleep deprivation and sleep recovery stages in spontaneously hypertensive rats, which were dramatically different from Wistar‐Kyoto rats. These results indicate that the disruption of sleep−wake pattern and sleep homeostasis in spontaneously hypertensive rats might be related to abnormalities of the serotonergic system.

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Su‐Ying Cui, Yuan‐Li Huang, Xiang‐Yu Cui, Hui‐Ling Zhao, Xiao Hu, Yu‐Tong Liu, Yong‐He Zhang Journal of Sleep Research
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz277/5625549?rss=1 Obesity and other medical comorbidities among NT1 patients after the Norwegian H1N1 influenza epidemic and vaccination campaign 2019-11-13T18:00:00.000-06:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesNarcolepsy type 1 (NT1) may be complicated by comorbidities. We aimed to study the extent of obesity and other medical comorbidities in a Norwegian population of NT1 patients with debut of symptoms after the 2009 H1N1 influenza epidemic and vaccination campaign. We also aimed to explore factors associated with obesity.Methods91 patients (48 children and 43 adults) were included in this cross-sectional study, 80 of whom were H1N1-vaccinated. All participants were hospitalized and underwent sleep investigation and physical examination, and completed a semi-structured clinical interview.ResultsIn children, 16 females (70%) and 10 males (40%) were classified as overweight or obese. Twenty children (42%) had a co-existing medical disorder. Medical comorbidity was significantly positively associated with BMI in children (p=0.032). In adults, 19 females (58%) and 7 males (70%) were classified as overweight or obese. Twenty-six adults (61%) had a co-existing medical disorder. We found no factors significantly associated with BMI in adults. On a fatigue scale from 0-100, lower scores indicating more fatigue, we found a mean (SD) total fatigue score of 50 (17) in children and 39 (16) in adults.ConclusionIn a cohort of predominantly H1N1-vaccinated NT1 patients, we found a high prevalence of overweight or obesity. Half of the cohort presented with one or more additional medical comorbidities, and patients reported a clinically relevant degree of fatigue. Our findings highlight the importance of carefully monitoring patients with NT1 with regard to development of obesity, which is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disorders.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) may be complicated by comorbidities. We aimed to study the extent of obesity and other medical comorbidities in a Norwegian population of NT1 patients with debut of symptoms after the 2009 H1N1 influenza epidemic and vaccination campaign. We also aimed to explore factors associated with obesity.
Methods
91 patients (48 children and 43 adults) were included in this cross-sectional study, 80 of whom were H1N1-vaccinated. All participants were hospitalized and underwent sleep investigation and physical examination, and completed a semi-structured clinical interview.
Results
In children, 16 females (70%) and 10 males (40%) were classified as overweight or obese. Twenty children (42%) had a co-existing medical disorder. Medical comorbidity was significantly positively associated with BMI in children (p=0.032). In adults, 19 females (58%) and 7 males (70%) were classified as overweight or obese. Twenty-six adults (61%) had a co-existing medical disorder. We found no factors significantly associated with BMI in adults. On a fatigue scale from 0-100, lower scores indicating more fatigue, we found a mean (SD) total fatigue score of 50 (17) in children and 39 (16) in adults.
Conclusion
In a cohort of predominantly H1N1-vaccinated NT1 patients, we found a high prevalence of overweight or obesity. Half of the cohort presented with one or more additional medical comorbidities, and patients reported a clinically relevant degree of fatigue. Our findings highlight the importance of carefully monitoring patients with NT1 with regard to development of obesity, which is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disorders.]]>
Oxford Academic - Advanced Access
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326986.php Why is my leg shaking? 2019-11-13T12:00:00.000-06:00 There are many reasons a person’s leg could be shaking, from restless legs syndrome to anxiety. Read this article to learn about 10 possible causes of a shaky leg. Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12945?af=R “Like Walking in a Fog”—Parents' perceptions of sleep and consequences of sleep loss when staying overnight with their child in hospital 2019-11-13T11:39:54.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, EarlyView. Summary

Disruption of parental sleep in hospital, with frequent awakenings and poor sleep quality, limits the parents' resources to meet the child's needs and maintain parental wellbeing. The aim of the study was to explore and describe how parents perceive their sleep when staying overnight with their sick child in hospital. A further aim was to explore and describe parents’ perception of what circumstances influence their sleep in the hospital. Twenty‐two parents who were accommodated with their sick child (0–17 years) in paediatric wards in Norway and Sweden participated. Interviews were conducted during the hospital stay to elicit their perspectives. Phenomenography was used to analyse data. Two descriptive categories were found: (a) “Perceptions of sleep”, with two sub‐categories: “Sleep in the paediatric ward” and “Consequences of sleep loss”; and (b) “Circumstances influencing sleep in the paediatric ward” with three sub‐categories: “The importance of the family”, “Information and routines at the paediatric ward”, and “Accommodation facilities”. Parents’ sleep and needs must be acknowledged in paediatric wards. An individual plan of care for the upcoming night could be a valuable tool for both the parents and nurses. The child's medical needs must be met with respect to the parents’ willingness to take part in the child's care during the night, and the need for rest and sleep for both parent and child.

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Charlotte Angelhoff, Hege Sjølie, Evalotte Mörelius, Borghild Løyland Journal of Sleep Research
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191113101838.htm The effects of a mock shelter environment on sleep 2019-11-13T09:18:38.000-06:00 Researchers conducted an experiment on the nature of sleep in an evacuation shelter environment. This experiment was performed by creating a mock shelter in the university's gymnasium with four of the emergency blankets as well as a standard futon set. The results showed that the low temperature (5°C) inside the gymnasium affected subjects' sleep and body temperature regulation, reducing sleep efficiency by 10% and increasing fatigue. ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191113101838.htm The effects of a mock shelter environment on sleep 2019-11-13T09:18:38.000-06:00 Researchers conducted an experiment on the nature of sleep in an evacuation shelter environment. This experiment was performed by creating a mock shelter in the university's gymnasium with four of the emergency blankets as well as a standard futon set. The results showed that the low temperature (5°C) inside the gymnasium affected subjects' sleep and body temperature regulation, reducing sleep efficiency by 10% and increasing fatigue. Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191113101838.htm The effects of a mock shelter environment on sleep 2019-11-13T09:18:38.000-06:00 Researchers conducted an experiment on the nature of sleep in an evacuation shelter environment. This experiment was performed by creating a mock shelter in the university's gymnasium with four of the emergency blankets as well as a standard futon set. The results showed that the low temperature (5°C) inside the gymnasium affected subjects' sleep and body temperature regulation, reducing sleep efficiency by 10% and increasing fatigue. Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191113101838.htm The effects of a mock shelter environment on sleep 2019-11-13T09:18:38.000-06:00 Researchers conducted an experiment on the nature of sleep in an evacuation shelter environment. This experiment was performed by creating a mock shelter in the university's gymnasium with four of the emergency blankets as well as a standard futon set. The results showed that the low temperature (5°C) inside the gymnasium affected subjects' sleep and body temperature regulation, reducing sleep efficiency by 10% and increasing fatigue. Science Daily - Insomnia https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191113092608.htm Study finds links between early screen exposure, sleep disruption and EBD in kids 2019-11-13T08:26:08.000-06:00 A new study has found that first exposure earlier than 18 months of age to screen devices -- such as smartphones, tablets, videogame consoles, television etc -- and the presence of multiple screen devices in the bedroom are associated with elevated sleep disruption and emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) in preschool children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191113092608.htm Study finds links between early screen exposure, sleep disruption and EBD in kids 2019-11-13T08:26:08.000-06:00 A new study has found that first exposure earlier than 18 months of age to screen devices -- such as smartphones, tablets, videogame consoles, television etc -- and the presence of multiple screen devices in the bedroom are associated with elevated sleep disruption and emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) in preschool children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191113092608.htm Study finds links between early screen exposure, sleep disruption and EBD in kids 2019-11-13T08:26:08.000-06:00 A new study has found that first exposure earlier than 18 months of age to screen devices -- such as smartphones, tablets, videogame consoles, television etc -- and the presence of multiple screen devices in the bedroom are associated with elevated sleep disruption and emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) in preschool children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191113092608.htm Study finds links between early screen exposure, sleep disruption and EBD in kids 2019-11-13T08:26:08.000-06:00 A new study has found that first exposure earlier than 18 months of age to screen devices -- such as smartphones, tablets, videogame consoles, television etc -- and the presence of multiple screen devices in the bedroom are associated with elevated sleep disruption and emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) in preschool children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) Science Daily - Insomnia https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30182-2/fulltext?rss=yes The association of goal-striving stress with sleep duration and sleep quality among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study 2019-11-12T18:00:00.000-06:00 African Americans (AAs) report a higher frequency of certain stressors over their lifetime which may impact biological processes that can impair sleep. For this reason, goal-striving stress (GSS), the difference between aspiration and achievement, weighted by disappointment, may contribute to poor sleep quality and suboptimal sleep duration among AAs. Loretta R. Cain-Shields, Dayna A. Johnson, LáShauntá Glover, Mario Sims Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30186-X/fulltext?rss=yes Adolescent sleep and technology-use rules: results from the California Health Interview Survey 2019-11-12T18:00:00.000-06:00 This study reports on adolescent sleep, technology-use rules at home, and their potential association using the 2017 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). Jennifer M. Bowers, Anne Moyer Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz255/5625283?rss=1 Electrophysiological features of sleep in children with Kir4.1 channel mutations and Autism–Epilepsy phenotype: a preliminary study 2019-11-12T18:00:00.000-06:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesRecently, a role for gain-of-function (GoF) mutations of the astrocytic potassium channel Kir4.1 (KCNJ10 gene) has been proposed in subjects with Autism–Epilepsy phenotype (AEP). Epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are common and complexly related to sleep disorders. We tested whether well characterized mutations in KCNJ10 could result in specific sleep electrophysiological features, paving the way to the discovery of a potentially relevant biomarker for Kir4.1-related disorders.MethodsFor this case–control study, we recruited seven children with ASD either comorbid or not with epilepsy and/or EEG paroxysmal abnormalities (AEP) carrying GoF mutations of KCNJ10 and seven children with similar phenotypes but wild-type for the same gene, comparing period-amplitude features of slow waves detected by fronto-central bipolar EEG derivations (F3-C3, F4-C4, and Fz-Cz) during daytime naps.ResultsChildren with Kir4.1 mutations displayed longer slow waves periods than controls, in Fz-Cz (mean period = 112,617 ms ± SE = 0.465 in mutated versus mean period = 105,249 ms ± SE = 0.375 in controls, p < 0.001). An analog result was found in F3-C3 (mean period = 125,706 ms ± SE = 0.397 in mutated versus mean period = 120,872 ms ± SE = 0.472 in controls, p < 0.001) and F4-C4 (mean period = 127,914 ms ± SE = 0.557 in mutated versus mean period = 118,174 ms ± SE = 0.442 in controls, p < 0.001).ConclusionThis preliminary finding suggests that period-amplitude slow wave features are modified in subjects carrying Kir4.1 GoF mutations. Potential clinical applications of this finding are discussed.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Recently, a role for gain-of-function (GoF) mutations of the astrocytic potassium channel Kir4.1 (KCNJ10 gene) has been proposed in subjects with Autism–Epilepsy phenotype (AEP). Epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are common and complexly related to sleep disorders. We tested whether well characterized mutations in KCNJ10 could result in specific sleep electrophysiological features, paving the way to the discovery of a potentially relevant biomarker for Kir4.1-related disorders.
Methods
For this case–control study, we recruited seven children with ASD either comorbid or not with epilepsy and/or EEG paroxysmal abnormalities (AEP) carrying GoF mutations of KCNJ10 and seven children with similar phenotypes but wild-type for the same gene, comparing period-amplitude features of slow waves detected by fronto-central bipolar EEG derivations (F3-C3, F4-C4, and Fz-Cz) during daytime naps.
Results
Children with Kir4.1 mutations displayed longer slow waves periods than controls, in Fz-Cz (mean period = 112,617 ms ± SE = 0.465 in mutated versus mean period = 105,249 ms ± SE = 0.375 in controls, p < 0.001). An analog result was found in F3-C3 (mean period = 125,706 ms ± SE = 0.397 in mutated versus mean period = 120,872 ms ± SE = 0.472 in controls, p < 0.001) and F4-C4 (mean period = 127,914 ms ± SE = 0.557 in mutated versus mean period = 118,174 ms ± SE = 0.442 in controls, p < 0.001).
Conclusion
This preliminary finding suggests that period-amplitude slow wave features are modified in subjects carrying Kir4.1 GoF mutations. Potential clinical applications of this finding are discussed.]]>
Oxford Academic - Advanced Access
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz255/5625283?rss=1 Electrophysiological features of sleep in children with Kir4.1 channel mutations and Autism–Epilepsy phenotype: a preliminary study 2019-11-12T18:00:00.000-06:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesRecently, a role for gain-of-function (GoF) mutations of the astrocytic potassium channel Kir4.1 (KCNJ10 gene) has been proposed in subjects with Autism–Epilepsy phenotype (AEP). Epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are common and complexly related to sleep disorders. We tested whether well characterized mutations in KCNJ10 could result in specific sleep electrophysiological features, paving the way to the discovery of a potentially relevant biomarker for Kir4.1-related disorders.MethodsFor this case–control study, we recruited seven children with ASD either comorbid or not with epilepsy and/or EEG paroxysmal abnormalities (AEP) carrying GoF mutations of KCNJ10 and seven children with similar phenotypes but wild-type for the same gene, comparing period-amplitude features of slow waves detected by fronto-central bipolar EEG derivations (F3-C3, F4-C4, and Fz-Cz) during daytime naps.ResultsChildren with Kir4.1 mutations displayed longer slow waves periods than controls, in Fz-Cz (mean period = 112,617 ms ± SE = 0.465 in mutated versus mean period = 105,249 ms ± SE = 0.375 in controls, p < 0.001). An analog result was found in F3-C3 (mean period = 125,706 ms ± SE = 0.397 in mutated versus mean period = 120,872 ms ± SE = 0.472 in controls, p < 0.001) and F4-C4 (mean period = 127,914 ms ± SE = 0.557 in mutated versus mean period = 118,174 ms ± SE = 0.442 in controls, p < 0.001).ConclusionThis preliminary finding suggests that period-amplitude slow wave features are modified in subjects carrying Kir4.1 GoF mutations. Potential clinical applications of this finding are discussed.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Recently, a role for gain-of-function (GoF) mutations of the astrocytic potassium channel Kir4.1 (KCNJ10 gene) has been proposed in subjects with Autism–Epilepsy phenotype (AEP). Epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are common and complexly related to sleep disorders. We tested whether well characterized mutations in KCNJ10 could result in specific sleep electrophysiological features, paving the way to the discovery of a potentially relevant biomarker for Kir4.1-related disorders.
Methods
For this case–control study, we recruited seven children with ASD either comorbid or not with epilepsy and/or EEG paroxysmal abnormalities (AEP) carrying GoF mutations of KCNJ10 and seven children with similar phenotypes but wild-type for the same gene, comparing period-amplitude features of slow waves detected by fronto-central bipolar EEG derivations (F3-C3, F4-C4, and Fz-Cz) during daytime naps.
Results
Children with Kir4.1 mutations displayed longer slow waves periods than controls, in Fz-Cz (mean period = 112,617 ms ± SE = 0.465 in mutated versus mean period = 105,249 ms ± SE = 0.375 in controls, p < 0.001). An analog result was found in F3-C3 (mean period = 125,706 ms ± SE = 0.397 in mutated versus mean period = 120,872 ms ± SE = 0.472 in controls, p < 0.001) and F4-C4 (mean period = 127,914 ms ± SE = 0.557 in mutated versus mean period = 118,174 ms ± SE = 0.442 in controls, p < 0.001).
Conclusion
This preliminary finding suggests that period-amplitude slow wave features are modified in subjects carrying Kir4.1 GoF mutations. Potential clinical applications of this finding are discussed.]]>
Oxford Academic - Open Access
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191112122625.htm More Americans struggle to fall asleep, stay asleep 2019-11-12T11:26:25.000-06:00 If you have trouble sleeping, you're not alone. New research finds more Americans have trouble falling asleep and staying asleep. The difficulties were most prevalent in people with healthy sleep length. ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191112122625.htm More Americans struggle to fall asleep, stay asleep 2019-11-12T11:26:25.000-06:00 If you have trouble sleeping, you're not alone. New research finds more Americans have trouble falling asleep and staying asleep. The difficulties were most prevalent in people with healthy sleep length. Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191112122625.htm More Americans struggle to fall asleep, stay asleep 2019-11-12T11:26:25.000-06:00 If you have trouble sleeping, you're not alone. New research finds more Americans have trouble falling asleep and staying asleep. The difficulties were most prevalent in people with healthy sleep length. Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191112122625.htm More Americans struggle to fall asleep, stay asleep 2019-11-12T11:26:25.000-06:00 If you have trouble sleeping, you're not alone. New research finds more Americans have trouble falling asleep and staying asleep. The difficulties were most prevalent in people with healthy sleep length. Science Daily - Insomnia https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz275/5622598?rss=1 Dreaming of Better Health: Quantifying the Many Dimensions of Sleep 2019-11-11T18:00:00.000-06:00 Oxford Academic - Advanced Access https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326973.php Diet, body clock, hormones, and metabolism: What's the link? 2019-11-11T11:00:00.000-06:00 A new study of mice has shown how stress hormones control fat and sugar levels in a time dependent way and how a high calorie diet can alter this rhythm. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12939?af=R Assessing the role of nocturnal core body temperature dysregulation as a biomarker of neurodegeneration 2019-11-11T10:40:33.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, EarlyView. Summary

The vast majority of patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder will develop a neurodegenerative α‐synuclein‐related condition, such as Parkinson’s disease or dementia with Lewy bodies. The pathology underlying dream enactment overlaps anatomically with the brainstem regions that regulate circadian core body temperature. Previously, nocturnal core body temperature regulation has been shown to be impaired in Parkinson’s disease. However, no study to date has investigated nocturnal core body temperature changes in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, which may prove to be an early objective biomarker for α‐synucleinopathies. Ten healthy controls, 15 patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 31 patients with Parkinson’s disease and six patients with dementia with Lewy bodies underwent clinical assessment and nocturnal polysomnography with core body temperature monitoring. A validated cosinor method was utilised for core body temperature analysis. No differences in mesor, nadir or time of nadir were observed between groups. However, when compared with healthy controls, the amplitude of the nocturnal core body temperature (mesor minus nadir) was significantly reduced in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, Parkinson’s disease with concurrent rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and dementia with Lewy bodies (p < 0.001, p = 0.043 and p = 0.017, respectively). Importantly, this relationship was not seen in those patients with Parkinson’s disease without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. In addition, there was a significant negative correlation between amplitude of the core body temperature and self‐reported rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder symptoms. Changes in thermoregulatory circadian rhythm may be specifically associated with the pathology underlying rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder rather than simply that of α‐synucleinopathy. These findings implicate thermoregulatory dysfunction as a potential early biomarker for development of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder‐associated neurodegeneration, and suggest that subpopulations with differing pathological underpinnings might exist in Parkinson’s disease.

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Arabella K. Raupach, Kaylena A. Ehgoetz Martens, Negar Memarian, George Zhong, Elie Matar, Glenda M. Halliday, Ronald Grunstein, Simon J.G. Lewis Journal of Sleep Research
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326956.php How does temperature affect mental health? 2019-11-11T10:00:00.000-06:00 A new study finds that increases in temperature negatively affect mental health outcomes. The authors conclude that this is due to sleep disturbance. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/club-hypnos-at-abct/ Club Hypnos at ABCT 2019-11-10T21:45:05.000-06:00 Planning on Attending the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy Conference (ABCT) on November 21-24? Be sure to attend the SRS's Club Hypnos Where: Hyatt Regency Hotel, Embassy A Room in  Atlanta, Georgia Time: 5:30-6:30pm The post Club Hypnos at ABCT appeared first on Sleep Research Society. Planning on Attending the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy Conference (ABCT) on November 21-24?

Be sure to attend the SRS’s Club Hypnos

Where: Hyatt Regency Hotel, Embassy A Room in  Atlanta, Georgia

Time: 5:30-6:30pm

The post Club Hypnos at ABCT appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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lynn Sleep Research Society
https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30166-4/fulltext?rss=yes One-year changes in self-reported napping behaviors across the retirement transition 2019-11-10T18:00:00.000-06:00 To estimate associations of retirement with self-reported frequency and duration of naps. Christine M. Harden, Paul E. Peppard, Mari Palta, Jodi H. Barnet, Lauren Hale, F. Javier Nieto, Erika W. Hagen Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30221-9/fulltext?rss=yes Sleep as a symbol of calm in the universe 2019-11-08T18:00:00.000-06:00 There are some works of art or literature that ignite curiosity and the imagination. The painting, Leda without the Swan, was one of those. In the foreground there is an image is of a slim woman, asleep, perhaps on a beach–the background was indistinct. The author had no knowledge of the painter, Kees van Dongen, and was puzzled by the mysterious title, Leda without the Swan. Meir H. Kryger Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30185-8/fulltext?rss=yes Prevalence of self-reported suboptimal sleep in Australia and receipt of sleep care: results from the 2017 National Social Survey 2019-11-08T18:00:00.000-06:00 The National Sleep Foundation’s (NSFs) sleep duration recommendations and quality indicators enable trichotomous classification of sleep parameters as ‘appropriate’, ‘may be appropriate’ or ‘inappropriate’, with the latter representing ‘suboptimal’ sleep. This study reports the prevalence of self-reported suboptimal sleep and associated demographics in a large sample of Australian adults. In addition, reported are rates of suboptimal sleep assessment by health-care clinicians/services and receipt of and desire for sleep care, and their associations with suboptimal sleep. Alexandra P. Metse, Jenny A. Bowman Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/submit-your-abstract-or-session-proposal/ Submit Your Abstract or Session Proposal  2019-11-08T15:23:36.000-06:00 The SLEEP 2020 Abstract and Session Proposal submission sites are now open and ready for your submission. There is no better way to see yourself at SLEEP than to be a part of the program! Present new findings, discuss research topics, or contribute to the rich agenda of SLEEP 2020. View the submission guidelines and [...] The post Submit Your Abstract or Session Proposal  appeared first on Sleep Research Society. The SLEEP 2020 Abstract and Session Proposal submission sites are now open and ready for your submission. There is no better way to see yourself at SLEEP than to be a part of the program! Present new findings, discuss research topics, or contribute to the rich agenda of SLEEP 2020. View the submission guidelines and submit an abstract and/or session proposal. Learn more.

The post Submit Your Abstract or Session Proposal  appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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lynn Sleep Research Society
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191108102850.htm Stress hormone helps control the circadian rhythm of brain cells 2019-11-08T09:28:50.000-06:00 Researchers have shown how the brain's circadian rhythm in rats is, among other things, controlled by the stress hormone corticosterone -- in humans called cortisol. This has been shown by means of a completely new method in the form of implanted micropumps. ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191108102850.htm Stress hormone helps control the circadian rhythm of brain cells 2019-11-08T09:28:50.000-06:00 Researchers have shown how the brain's circadian rhythm in rats is, among other things, controlled by the stress hormone corticosterone -- in humans called cortisol. This has been shown by means of a completely new method in the form of implanted micropumps. Science Daily - Insomnia https://www.sleephealthjournal.org/article/S2352-7218(19)30164-0/fulltext?rss=yes Racial and ethnic disparities in sleep outcomes among urban children with and without asthma 2019-11-07T18:00:00.000-06:00 Suboptimal sleep has been documented in at-risk groups such as urban minority children, particularly those with asthma. It is therefore critical to examine differences in sleep outcomes across specific racial and ethnic groups and to identify factors that contribute to such variations in sleep outcomes to inform tailored interventions to improve sleep health. Daphne Koinis-Mitchell, Julie Boergers, Sheryl J. Kopel, Elizabeth L. McQuaid, Michael L Farrow, Monique LeBourgeois Sleep Health | Journal of the National Sleep Foundation https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz269/5614711?rss=1 The Spectral Fingerprint of Sleep Problems in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder 2019-11-07T18:00:00.000-06:00 AbstractSTUDY OBJECTIVESSleep problems are a core feature of post-traumatic stress disorder. The aim of this study was to find a robust objective measure for the sleep disturbance in PTSD patients.METHODSThe current study assessed EEG power across a wide frequency range and multiple scalp locations, in matched trauma-exposed individuals with and without PTSD, during rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. In addition, a full polysomnographical evaluation was performed, including sleep staging and assessment of respiratory function, limb movements and heart rate. The occurrence of sleep disorders was also assessed.RESULTSIn PTSD patients, NREM sleep shows a substantial loss of slow oscillation power and increased higher frequency activity compared to controls. The change is most pronounced over right-frontal sensors and correlates with insomnia. PTSD REM sleep shows a large power shift in the opposite direction, with increased slow oscillation power over occipital areas, which is strongly related to nightmare activity and to lesser extent with insomnia. These pronounced spectral changes occur in the context of severe subjective sleep problems, increased occurrence of various sleep disorders and modest changes in sleep macrostructure.CONCLUSIONSThis is the first study to show pronounced changes in EEG spectral topologies during both NREM and REM sleep in PTSD. Importantly, the observed power changes reflect the hallmarks of PTSD sleep problems: insomnia and nightmares and may thus be specific for PTSD. A spectral index derived from these data distinguishes patients from controls with high effect size, bearing promise as a candidate biomarker.
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES
Sleep problems are a core feature of post-traumatic stress disorder. The aim of this study was to find a robust objective measure for the sleep disturbance in PTSD patients.
METHODS
The current study assessed EEG power across a wide frequency range and multiple scalp locations, in matched trauma-exposed individuals with and without PTSD, during rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. In addition, a full polysomnographical evaluation was performed, including sleep staging and assessment of respiratory function, limb movements and heart rate. The occurrence of sleep disorders was also assessed.
RESULTS
In PTSD patients, NREM sleep shows a substantial loss of slow oscillation power and increased higher frequency activity compared to controls. The change is most pronounced over right-frontal sensors and correlates with insomnia. PTSD REM sleep shows a large power shift in the opposite direction, with increased slow oscillation power over occipital areas, which is strongly related to nightmare activity and to lesser extent with insomnia. These pronounced spectral changes occur in the context of severe subjective sleep problems, increased occurrence of various sleep disorders and modest changes in sleep macrostructure.
CONCLUSIONS
This is the first study to show pronounced changes in EEG spectral topologies during both NREM and REM sleep in PTSD. Importantly, the observed power changes reflect the hallmarks of PTSD sleep problems: insomnia and nightmares and may thus be specific for PTSD. A spectral index derived from these data distinguishes patients from controls with high effect size, bearing promise as a candidate biomarker.]]>
Oxford Academic - Advanced Access
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz266/5614684?rss=1 Circadian and sleep/wake-dependent variations in tau phosphorylation are driven by temperature 2019-11-07T18:00:00.000-06:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesAggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. Sleep disturbances are common in AD patients, and insufficient sleep may be a risk factor for AD. Recent evidence suggests that tau phosphorylation is dysregulated by sleep disturbances in mice. However, the physiological regulation of tau phosphorylation during the sleep-wake cycle is currently unknown. We thus aimed to determine whether tau phosphorylation is regulated by circadian rhythms, inherently linked to the sleep-wake cycle.MethodsTo answer these questions, we analyzed by Western blotting tau protein and associated kinases and phosphatases in the brains of awake, sleeping and sleep-deprived B6 mice. We also recorded their temperature.ResultsWe found that tau phosphorylation undergoes sleep-driven circadian variations as it is hyperphosphorylated during sleep but not during acute sleep deprivation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the mechanism behind these changes involves temperature, as tau phosphorylation was inversely correlated with circadian- and sleep deprivation-induced variations in body temperature, and prevented by housing the animals at a warmer temperature. Notably, similar changes in tau phosphorylation were reproduced in neuronal cells exposed to temperatures recorded during the sleep/wake cycle. Our results also suggest that inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) may explain the hyperphosphorylation of tau during sleep-induced hypothermia.ConclusionTaken together, our results demonstrate that tau phosphorylation follows a circadian rhythm driven mostly by body temperature and sleep, and provide the physiological basis for further understanding how sleep deregulation can affect tau and ultimately AD pathology.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. Sleep disturbances are common in AD patients, and insufficient sleep may be a risk factor for AD. Recent evidence suggests that tau phosphorylation is dysregulated by sleep disturbances in mice. However, the physiological regulation of tau phosphorylation during the sleep-wake cycle is currently unknown. We thus aimed to determine whether tau phosphorylation is regulated by circadian rhythms, inherently linked to the sleep-wake cycle.
Methods
To answer these questions, we analyzed by Western blotting tau protein and associated kinases and phosphatases in the brains of awake, sleeping and sleep-deprived B6 mice. We also recorded their temperature.
Results
We found that tau phosphorylation undergoes sleep-driven circadian variations as it is hyperphosphorylated during sleep but not during acute sleep deprivation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the mechanism behind these changes involves temperature, as tau phosphorylation was inversely correlated with circadian- and sleep deprivation-induced variations in body temperature, and prevented by housing the animals at a warmer temperature. Notably, similar changes in tau phosphorylation were reproduced in neuronal cells exposed to temperatures recorded during the sleep/wake cycle. Our results also suggest that inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) may explain the hyperphosphorylation of tau during sleep-induced hypothermia.
Conclusion
Taken together, our results demonstrate that tau phosphorylation follows a circadian rhythm driven mostly by body temperature and sleep, and provide the physiological basis for further understanding how sleep deregulation can affect tau and ultimately AD pathology.]]>
Oxford Academic - Advanced Access
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-52735-z Rotigotine suppresses sleep-related muscle activity augmented by injection of dialysis patients’ sera in a mouse model of restless legs syndrome 2019-11-07T18:00:00.000-06:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/advance-articles-for-november-2019/ Advance Articles for November 2019 2019-11-07T14:52:09.000-06:00 Sex Differences in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Phenotypes, the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Christine HJ Won, MD, MS, Michelle Reid, MPH, Tamar Sofer, PhD, Ali Azarbarzin, PhD, Shaun Purcell, PhD, David White, MD, Andrew Wellman, MD, PhD, Scott Sands, PhD, Susan Redline, MD, MPH Effects of Sleep on a High Heat Capacity Mattress on Sleep [...] The post Advance Articles for November 2019 appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

Sex Differences in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Phenotypes, the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
Christine HJ Won, MD, MS, Michelle Reid, MPH, Tamar Sofer, PhD, Ali Azarbarzin, PhD, Shaun Purcell, PhD, David White, MD, Andrew Wellman, MD, PhD, Scott Sands, PhD, Susan Redline, MD, MPH

Effects of Sleep on a High Heat Capacity Mattress on Sleep Stages, EEG Power Spectra, Cardiac Interbeat Intervals and Body Temperatures in Healthy Middle Aged Men
Sebastian Herberger, Kurt Kräuchi, Martin Glos, Katharina Lederer, Lisa Assmus, Julia Hein, Thomas Penzel, Ingo Fietze

What do people do before going to bed? A study of Bedtime Procrastination using Time Use Surveys
Sun ju Chung, Hyeyoung An, Sooyeon Suh

Behavioral interventions for pediatric insomnia: One treatment may not fit all
Michal Kahn, Michal Juda-Hanael, Efrat Livne-Karp, Liat Tikotzky, Thomas F Anders, Avi Sadeh

The post Advance Articles for November 2019 appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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lynn Sleep Research Society
https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/big-data-call-for-papers/ Big Data Call for Papers 2019-11-07T08:55:46.000-06:00 SLEEP is accepting submissions for a call for papers on mining big data to inform translational and clinical sleep and circadian research. Submit Now The post Big Data Call for Papers appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

SLEEP is accepting submissions for a call for papers on mining big data to inform translational and clinical sleep and circadian research.

The post Big Data Call for Papers appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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lynn Sleep Research Society
https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/young-investigators-research-forum-scholarships/ Young Investigators Research Forum Scholarships 2019-11-07T08:53:42.000-06:00 The SRS Foundation has partnered with the AASM Foundation to provide scholarships for travel to attend AASM's Young Investigators Research Forum. Must be an SRS Member to qualify for the SRSF Scholarship. Learn more The post Young Investigators Research Forum Scholarships appeared first on Sleep Research Society. The SRS Foundation has partnered with the AASM Foundation to provide scholarships for travel to attend AASM’s Young Investigators Research Forum. Must be an SRS Member to qualify for the SRSF Scholarship. Learn more

The post Young Investigators Research Forum Scholarships appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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lynn Sleep Research Society
https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/cda-2020-rfa-now-open/ CDA 2020 RFA Now Open 2019-11-07T07:59:37.000-06:00 2020 RFA Now Open! Submission Deadline: Sunday, January 5, 2020 at 11:59pm CT The Sleep Research Society Foundation (SRSF) recognizes the challenges of transitioning from post-doctoral training to independent research funding. The goal of these mentored awards is to invest in promising early career researchers and assist with their transition into independence as [...] The post CDA 2020 RFA Now Open appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

2020 RFA Now Open!
Submission Deadline: Sunday, January 5, 2020 at 11:59pm CT

The Sleep Research Society Foundation (SRSF) recognizes the challenges of transitioning from post-doctoral training to independent research funding. The goal of these mentored awards is to invest in promising early career researchers and assist with their transition into independence as junior investigators.

The SRSF expects to fund up to four awards and each award will be funded up to $50,000 for one year of support. Recipients are expected to apply for a mentored or independent federal research award within the funding period.

Please contact the SRSF or call (630) 737-9702 with any questions.

The post CDA 2020 RFA Now Open appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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lynn Sleep Research Society
https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/trainee-opportunity-get-published-in-sleep/ Trainee Opportunity – Get Published in SLEEP! 2019-11-07T03:58:27.000-06:00 Graduate students and postdoctoral research fellows who are current members of the Sleep Research Society, are now encouraged to submit original articles to the trainee Journal Club. These articles are a new manuscript type, authored by Sleep Research Society trainee members, that will review and comment on an original research article recently published in SLEEP. [...] The post Trainee Opportunity – Get Published in SLEEP! appeared first on Sleep Research Society. Graduate students and postdoctoral research fellows who are current members of the Sleep Research Society, are now encouraged to submit original articles to the trainee Journal Club. These articles are a new manuscript type, authored by Sleep Research Society trainee members, that will review and comment on an original research article recently published in SLEEP.

Former Trainee Member at Large. Janna Mantua, PhD, will be the editor for this manuscript type. Full details can be found here.

The post Trainee Opportunity – Get Published in SLEEP! appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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lynn Sleep Research Society
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz264/5614282?rss=1 Association of obstructive sleep apnea and cerebral small vessel disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis 2019-11-06T18:00:00.000-06:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesThe objective of the present study was to investigate the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the presence of various neuroimaging marker of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD).MethodsWe systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane library (from inception to May 2019) for studies evaluating the association between OSA and CSVD, which included white matter hyperintensities (WMH), silent brain infarction (SBI), cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), and perivascular spaces (PVS). Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) were estimated using random-effects meta-analysis.ResultsAfter screening 7290 publications, 20 studies were finally included involving 6036 subjects. The sample size ranged from 27 to 1763 (median 158, interquartile range: 67–393). The meta-analysis showed that moderate to severe OSA was positively associated with WMH (13 studies, n = 4412, OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.53 to 3.25, I2 = 80.3%) and SBI (12 studies, n = 3353, OR 1.54, 95% CI = 1.06 to 2.23, I2 = 52%). There was no association with CMBs (three studies, n = 342, OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 0.61 to 7.73, I2 = 60.2%) or PVS (two studies, n = 267, OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 0.28 to 8.57, I2 = 69.5%). There was no relationship between mild OSA and CSVD.ConclusionCurrent evidence suggests that moderate to severe sleep apnea is positively related to WMH and SBI, but not CMBs or PVS, which suggests that OSA may contribute to the pathogenesis of CSVD. Further large cohort studies should be prioritized to confirm the findings.
Abstract
Study Objectives
The objective of the present study was to investigate the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the presence of various neuroimaging marker of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD).
Methods
We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane library (from inception to May 2019) for studies evaluating the association between OSA and CSVD, which included white matter hyperintensities (WMH), silent brain infarction (SBI), cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), and perivascular spaces (PVS). Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) were estimated using random-effects meta-analysis.
Results
After screening 7290 publications, 20 studies were finally included involving 6036 subjects. The sample size ranged from 27 to 1763 (median 158, interquartile range: 67–393). The meta-analysis showed that moderate to severe OSA was positively associated with WMH (13 studies, n = 4412, OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.53 to 3.25, I2 = 80.3%) and SBI (12 studies, n = 3353, OR 1.54, 95% CI = 1.06 to 2.23, I2 = 52%). There was no association with CMBs (three studies, n = 342, OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 0.61 to 7.73, I2 = 60.2%) or PVS (two studies, n = 267, OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 0.28 to 8.57, I2 = 69.5%). There was no relationship between mild OSA and CSVD.
Conclusion
Current evidence suggests that moderate to severe sleep apnea is positively related to WMH and SBI, but not CMBs or PVS, which suggests that OSA may contribute to the pathogenesis of CSVD. Further large cohort studies should be prioritized to confirm the findings.]]>
Oxford Academic - Advanced Access
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106162539.htm Trouble sleeping? Insomnia symptoms linked to increased risk of stroke, heart attack 2019-11-06T15:25:39.000-06:00 People who have trouble sleeping may be more likely to have a stroke, heart attack or other cerebrovascular or cardiovascular diseases, according to a new study. ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106162539.htm Trouble sleeping? Insomnia symptoms linked to increased risk of stroke, heart attack 2019-11-06T15:25:39.000-06:00 People who have trouble sleeping may be more likely to have a stroke, heart attack or other cerebrovascular or cardiovascular diseases, according to a new study. Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106162539.htm Trouble sleeping? Insomnia symptoms linked to increased risk of stroke, heart attack 2019-11-06T15:25:39.000-06:00 People who have trouble sleeping may be more likely to have a stroke, heart attack or other cerebrovascular or cardiovascular diseases, according to a new study. Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106162539.htm Trouble sleeping? Insomnia symptoms linked to increased risk of stroke, heart attack 2019-11-06T15:25:39.000-06:00 People who have trouble sleeping may be more likely to have a stroke, heart attack or other cerebrovascular or cardiovascular diseases, according to a new study. Science Daily - Insomnia https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326935.php Doctors call for end to daylight saving time transitions 2019-11-06T11:00:00.000-06:00 Citing evidence on the health risks arising from biological clock misalignments, doctors call for an end to daylight saving time transitions. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106085453.htm Circuit responsible for building memories during sleep 2019-11-06T07:54:53.000-06:00 Neuroscientists have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study. ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106085453.htm Circuit responsible for building memories during sleep 2019-11-06T07:54:53.000-06:00 Neuroscientists have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study. Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106085453.htm Circuit responsible for building memories during sleep 2019-11-06T07:54:53.000-06:00 Neuroscientists have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study. Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106085453.htm Circuit responsible for building memories during sleep 2019-11-06T07:54:53.000-06:00 Neuroscientists have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study. Science Daily - Insomnia https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106085433.htm School-based sleep program may benefit adolescents 2019-11-06T07:54:33.000-06:00 A recent study uncovered potential long-term benefits of a school-based sleep education program for adolescents. ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106085433.htm School-based sleep program may benefit adolescents 2019-11-06T07:54:33.000-06:00 A recent study uncovered potential long-term benefits of a school-based sleep education program for adolescents. Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106085433.htm School-based sleep program may benefit adolescents 2019-11-06T07:54:33.000-06:00 A recent study uncovered potential long-term benefits of a school-based sleep education program for adolescents. Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191106085433.htm School-based sleep program may benefit adolescents 2019-11-06T07:54:33.000-06:00 A recent study uncovered potential long-term benefits of a school-based sleep education program for adolescents. Science Daily - Insomnia https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12941?af=R Difficulties falling asleep among adolescents: Social inequality and time trends 1991–2018 2019-11-06T06:37:38.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, EarlyView. Summary

Sleep problems in adolescence are increasingly common, and associated with adverse health and psychological outcomes. Adolescents’ sleep problems may be related to the family’s socioeconomic status, but studies are few and no study has examined whether social inequality in sleep problems changes as sleep problems become increasingly common. This study examined trends in difficulties falling asleep among adolescents in Denmark, whether this sleep problem was associated with socioeconomic status, and whether this association changed from 1991 to 2018. The study applied data from eight comparable surveys among 11–15 year olds in Denmark 1991–2018, the Danish arm of the international Health Behaviour in School‐aged Children study, N = 30,002. The prevalence of daily difficulties falling asleep increased from 7.0% to 13.4% in 1991–2018 with higher frequencies among girls and younger adolescents. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for daily difficulties was 1.14 (1.05–1.24) in middle and 1.52 (1.37–1.69) in low compared with high socioeconomic status. The absolute social inequality in difficulties falling asleep was persistent in 1991–2018 whereas the relative social inequality may have decreased. The increasing prevalence and the social inequality in difficulties falling asleep among adolescents is a serious public health concern that calls for more attention and efforts.

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Bjørn E. Holstein, Janni Ammitzbøll, Mogens Trab Damsgaard, Sofie Weber Pant, Trine Pagh Pedersen, Anne Mette Skovgaard Journal of Sleep Research
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326926.php Deep sleep may help treat anxiety 2019-11-06T02:00:00.000-06:00 New research 'establishes a causal connection between sleep and anxiety' and identifies the type of sleep needed to soothe an anxious mind. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12940?af=R Preventing sleep deficit in adolescents: Long‐term effects of a quasi‐experimental school‐based intervention study 2019-11-05T11:03:31.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, EarlyView. Abstract

Adolescents are at risk of sleep deficit, which has serious consequences for their daytime functioning. However, school‐based interventions to improve sleep have shown limited success. This might be due to the content of the programmes (e.g., not targeting central factors such as daytime stress and technology use) or because changes have not been captured due to a lack of long‐term follow‐ups. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the long‐term effects of a school‐based sleep education curriculum including time‐management training. The study used a quasi‐experimental design. Participants were 3,622 adolescents (mean age 13.7, 48% girls); 286 were in the intervention group and 3,336 were followed as a natural control group. Data were collected before the intervention and at a 1‐year follow‐up. We divided participants into three groups according to baseline sleep duration (calculated from self‐reported bed‐ and wake times, minus sleep onset latency): insufficient (<7 hr), borderline (7–8 hr) and adequate (>8 hr). Adolescents in the intervention group were ~2 times less likely to report insufficient sleep at follow‐up as compared to controls. Sleep knowledge improved significantly in the intervention group but there were no changes in emotional sleep hygiene (e.g., bedtime worry) and perceived stress. Surprisingly, technology use increased and behavioural sleep hygiene worsened in the intervention group. Although the mechanisms of change need further investigation, the results of this study point to potential long‐term benefits of school‐based sleep programmes.

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Serena Valeria Bauducco, Ida K. Flink, Katja Boersma, Steven J. Linton Journal of Sleep Research
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12855?af=R Mortality‐risk‐based apnea–hypopnea index thresholds for diagnostics of obstructive sleep apnea 2019-11-05T10:25:10.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, Volume 28, Issue 6, December 2019. Summary

The severity of obstructive sleep apnea is clinically assessed mainly using the apnea–hypopnea index. Based on the apnea–hypopnea index, patients are classified into four severity groups: non‐obstructive sleep apnea (apnea–hypopnea index < 5); mild (5 ≤ apnea–hypopnea index < 15); moderate (15 ≤ apnea–hypopnea index < 30); and severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea–hypopnea index ≥ 30). However, these thresholds lack solid clinical and scientific evidence. We hypothesize that the current apnea–hypopnea index thresholds are not optimal despite their global use, and aim to assess this clinical shortcoming by optimizing the thresholds with respect to the risk of all‐cause mortality. We analysed ambulatory polygraphic recordings of 1,783 patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea (mean follow‐up 18.3 years). We simulated 79,079 different threshold combinations in 100 randomized subgroups of the population and studied the relative risk of all‐cause mortality corresponding to each combination and randomization. The optimal thresholds were chosen according to three criteria: (a) the hazard ratios increase linearly between severity groups towards more severe obstructive sleep apnea; (b) each group includes at least 15% of the study population; (c) group sizes decrease with increasing obstructive sleep apnea severity. The risk of all‐cause mortality varied greatly across simulations; the threshold defining non‐obstructive sleep apnea group having the largest effect on the hazard ratios. The apnea–hypopnea index threshold combination of 3‐9‐24 was optimal in most of the subgroups. In conclusion, the assessment of obstructive sleep apnea severity based on the current apnea–hypopnea index thresholds is not optimal. Our novel approach provides methods for optimizing apnea–hypopnea index‐based severity classification, and the revised thresholds better differentiate patients into severity groups, ensuring that an increase in the severity corresponds to an increase in the risk of all‐cause mortality.

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Henri Korkalainen, Juha Töyräs, Sami Nikkonen, Timo Leppänen Journal of Sleep Research
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12845?af=R Post‐sigh sleep apneas in mice: Systematic review and data‐driven definition 2019-11-05T10:25:10.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, Volume 28, Issue 6, December 2019. Abstract

Sleep apneas can be categorized as post‐sigh (prevailing in non‐rapid eye movement sleep) or spontaneous (prevailing in rapid eye movement sleep) according to whether or not they are preceded by an augmented breath (sigh). Notably, the occurrence of these apnea subtypes changes differently in hypoxic/hypercapnic environments and in some genetic diseases, highlighting the importance of an objective discrimination. We aim to: (a) systematically review the literature comparing the criteria used in categorizing mouse sleep apneas; and (b) provide data‐driven criteria for this categorization, with the final goal of reducing experimental variability in future studies. Twenty‐two wild‐type mice, instrumented with electroencephalographic/electromyographic electrodes, were placed inside a whole‐body plethysmographic chamber to quantify sleep apneas and sighs. Wake–sleep states were scored on 4‐s epochs based on electroencephalographic/electromyographic signals. Literature revision showed that highly different criteria were used for post‐sigh apnea definition, the intervals for apnea occurrence after sigh ranging from 1 breath up to 20 s. In our data, the apnea occurrence rate during non‐rapid eye movement sleep was significantly higher than that calculated before the sigh only in the 1st and 2nd 4‐s epochs following a sigh. These data suggest that, in mice, apneas should be categorized as post‐sigh only if they start within 8 s from a sigh; the choice of shorter or longer time windows might underestimate or slightly overestimate their occurrence rate, respectively.

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Stefano Bastianini, Sara Alvente, Chiara Berteotti, Marcello Bosi, Viviana Lo Martire, Alessandro Silvani, Alice Valli, Giovanna Zoccoli Journal of Sleep Research
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12856?af=R Respiratory polygraphy in children with sleep‐disordered breathing 2019-11-05T10:25:10.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, Volume 28, Issue 6, December 2019. Abstract

At‐home respiratory polygraphy has been shown to be a reliable substitute for in‐laboratory polysomnography in adults for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea, but this is less well studied in children. One aim of this study was to examine the quality of at‐home respiratory polygraphy in children with sleep‐disordered breathing and to evaluate the interrater reliability of the results. Another aim was to study whether calibrated respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) flow can be used for the scoring of respiratory events when the airflow measurements are unreliable. Children aged 4–10 years, with sleep‐disordered breathing, underwent at‐home respiratory polygraphy. Of 113 polygraphies, only 46% were of acceptable quality, with missing nasal airflow being the most common problem (40%). The median recorded time with artifact‐free signal present in three traces simultaneously was 228 min (0–610 min). Seventeen polygraphy studies were selected for further study. Each study was scored by two independent scorers, with and without the nasal airflow signal present, the latter relying on RIP flow for the scoring of respiratory events. The apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) from the four different measurements was compared using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Comparison of the two scorers showed moderate agreement, with (ICC = 0.66) and without (ICC = 0.53) nasal airflow. One scorer had good agreement between AHI with and without nasal airflow (ICC = 0.81), whereas the other had poor agreement (ICC = 0.12). In conclusion, the scoring of respiratory events based on RIP flow is scorer dependent even for experienced scorers. The nasal airflow signal is frequently missing in paediatric respiratory polygraphies, which limits the usefulness of the method.

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Gunnhildur Gudnadottir, Louise Hafsten, Staffan Redfors, Eva Ellegård, Johan Hellgren Journal of Sleep Research
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.12867?af=R The pathophysiology of nightmare disorder: Signs of impaired sleep regulation and hyperarousal 2019-11-05T10:25:10.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Research, Volume 28, Issue 6, December 2019. Péter Simor, Borbála Blaskovich Journal of Sleep Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104144133.htm Daylight Saving Time has long-term effects on health 2019-11-04T13:41:33.000-06:00 The annual transition to and from daylight saving time (DST) has clinical implications that last longer than the days where clocks 'fall back' or 'spring forward.' ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104144133.htm Daylight Saving Time has long-term effects on health 2019-11-04T13:41:33.000-06:00 The annual transition to and from daylight saving time (DST) has clinical implications that last longer than the days where clocks 'fall back' or 'spring forward.' Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104144133.htm Daylight Saving Time has long-term effects on health 2019-11-04T13:41:33.000-06:00 The annual transition to and from daylight saving time (DST) has clinical implications that last longer than the days where clocks 'fall back' or 'spring forward.' Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104144133.htm Daylight Saving Time has long-term effects on health 2019-11-04T13:41:33.000-06:00 The annual transition to and from daylight saving time (DST) has clinical implications that last longer than the days where clocks 'fall back' or 'spring forward.' Science Daily - Insomnia https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104124140.htm Stressed to the max? Deep sleep can rewire the anxious brain 2019-11-04T11:41:40.000-06:00 Researchers have found that the type of sleep most apt to calm and reset the anxious brain is deep sleep, also known as non-rapid eye movement (NREM) slow-wave sleep, a state in which neural oscillations become highly synchronized, and heart rates and blood pressure drop. ScienceDaily - Insomnia Research News https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104124140.htm Stressed to the max? Deep sleep can rewire the anxious brain 2019-11-04T11:41:40.000-06:00 Researchers have found that the type of sleep most apt to calm and reset the anxious brain is deep sleep, also known as non-rapid eye movement (NREM) slow-wave sleep, a state in which neural oscillations become highly synchronized, and heart rates and blood pressure drop. Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104124140.htm Stressed to the max? Deep sleep can rewire the anxious brain 2019-11-04T11:41:40.000-06:00 Researchers have found that the type of sleep most apt to calm and reset the anxious brain is deep sleep, also known as non-rapid eye movement (NREM) slow-wave sleep, a state in which neural oscillations become highly synchronized, and heart rates and blood pressure drop. Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104124140.htm Stressed to the max? Deep sleep can rewire the anxious brain 2019-11-04T11:41:40.000-06:00 Researchers have found that the type of sleep most apt to calm and reset the anxious brain is deep sleep, also known as non-rapid eye movement (NREM) slow-wave sleep, a state in which neural oscillations become highly synchronized, and heart rates and blood pressure drop. Science Daily - Insomnia https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-52401-4 Blood pressure profile and endothelial function in restless legs syndrome 2019-11-03T18:00:00.000-06:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326896.php How waste gets 'washed out' of our brains during sleep 2019-11-02T06:00:00.000-05:00 A new study shows, for the first time, that cerebrospinal fluid washes into and out of the brain in waves during sleep, helping clear out waste. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326878.php What to know about headaches at night 2019-11-02T00:00:00.000-05:00 Several things can cause headaches at night. Read this article to learn more about the conditions associated with nighttime headaches, as well as how to treat them. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326878.php What to know about headaches at night 2019-11-02T00:00:00.000-05:00 Several things can cause headaches at night. Read this article to learn more about the conditions associated with nighttime headaches, as well as how to treat them. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326892.php Should you work out when sore? 2019-11-01T16:00:00.000-05:00 People may sometimes experience muscle soreness during or after exercise. Read on to find out the causes of this muscle soreness and how to continue working out when feeling sore. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326864.php Nocturnal seizures: Everything you need to know 2019-10-31T20:00:00.000-05:00 Nocturnal seizures occur when a person is asleep. As well as typical seizure symptoms, they may increase the risk of other complications. Learn more in this article. Medical News Today - Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191031174650.htm Are we 'brainwashed' during sleep? 2019-10-31T16:46:50.000-05:00 A new study illustrates that the brain's cerebrospinal fluid pulses during sleep, and that these motions are closely tied with brain wave activity and blood flow. It may confirm the hypothesis that CSF flow and slow-wave activity both help flush toxic, memory-impairing proteins from the brain. Science Daily - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191031174650.htm Are we 'brainwashed' during sleep? 2019-10-31T16:46:50.000-05:00 A new study illustrates that the brain's cerebrospinal fluid pulses during sleep, and that these motions are closely tied with brain wave activity and blood flow. It may confirm the hypothesis that CSF flow and slow-wave activity both help flush toxic, memory-impairing proteins from the brain. Science Daily - Sleep Disorder Research https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz223/5610750?rss=1 Striatal histamine mechanism in the pathogenesis of restless legs syndrome 2019-10-30T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesRestless legs syndrome (RLS) has been hypothesized to be generated by abnormal striatal dopamine transmission. Dopaminergic drugs are effective for the treatment of RLS. However, long-term use of dopaminergic drugs causes adverse effects. We used iron-deficient (ID) and iron-replacement (IR) rats to address the neuropathology of RLS and to determine if a histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonist might be a useful treatment. Histamine H3R antagonists have been shown to decrease motor activity.MethodsControl and ID rats were surgically implanted with electrodes for polysomnographic recording. After 3 days of baseline polysomnographic recordings, rats were systemically injected with the H3R agonist, α-methylhistamine, and antagonist, thioperamide. Recordings were continued after drug injection. Striatal H3R levels from control, ID, and IR rats were determined by western blots. Blood from control, ID, and IR rats was collected for the measurement of hematocrit levels.Resultsα-Methylhistamine and thioperamide increased and decreased motor activity, respectively, in control rats. In ID rats, α-methylhistamine had no effect on motor activity, whereas thioperamide decreased periodic leg movement (PLM) in sleep. Sleep–wake states were not significantly altered under any conditions. Striatal H3R levels were highest in ID rats, moderate to low in IR rats, and lowest in control rats. Striatal H3R levels were also found to positively and negatively correlate with PLM in sleep and hematocrit levels, respectively.ConclusionsA striatal histamine mechanism may be involved in ID anemia-induced RLS. Histamine H3R antagonists may be useful for the treatment of RLS.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Restless legs syndrome (RLS) has been hypothesized to be generated by abnormal striatal dopamine transmission. Dopaminergic drugs are effective for the treatment of RLS. However, long-term use of dopaminergic drugs causes adverse effects. We used iron-deficient (ID) and iron-replacement (IR) rats to address the neuropathology of RLS and to determine if a histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonist might be a useful treatment. Histamine H3R antagonists have been shown to decrease motor activity.
Methods
Control and ID rats were surgically implanted with electrodes for polysomnographic recording. After 3 days of baseline polysomnographic recordings, rats were systemically injected with the H3R agonist, α-methylhistamine, and antagonist, thioperamide. Recordings were continued after drug injection. Striatal H3R levels from control, ID, and IR rats were determined by western blots. Blood from control, ID, and IR rats was collected for the measurement of hematocrit levels.
Results
α-Methylhistamine and thioperamide increased and decreased motor activity, respectively, in control rats. In ID rats, α-methylhistamine had no effect on motor activity, whereas thioperamide decreased periodic leg movement (PLM) in sleep. Sleep–wake states were not significantly altered under any conditions. Striatal H3R levels were highest in ID rats, moderate to low in IR rats, and lowest in control rats. Striatal H3R levels were also found to positively and negatively correlate with PLM in sleep and hematocrit levels, respectively.
Conclusions
A striatal histamine mechanism may be involved in ID anemia-induced RLS. Histamine H3R antagonists may be useful for the treatment of RLS.]]>
Oxford Academic - Open Access
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41597-019-0171-x A multi-omics digital research object for the genetics of sleep regulation 2019-10-30T19:00:00.000-05:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-51710-y Relations of non-motor symptoms and dopamine transporter binding in REM sleep behavior disorder 2019-10-28T19:00:00.000-05:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz261/5606931?rss=1 Week-by-week changes in sleep EEG in healthy full-term newborns 2019-10-24T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractSpectral analysis of neonatal sleep is useful for studying brain maturation; however, most studies have analyzed convS†FM_Abstract_Para_FlushLeftentional broad bands described for awake adults, so a distinct approach for EEG analysis may disclose new findings.STUDY OBJECTIVESTo extract independent EEG broad bands using principal component analysis (PCA) and describe week-by-week EEG changes in quiet (QS) and active sleep (AS) during the first 5 weeks of postnatal life in healthy, full-term newborns.METHODSPolysomnography of spontaneous sleep was recorded in 60 newborns in 5 groups at 41, 42, 43, 44 and 45 weeks (n = 12 each) postconceptional age (POST-C). QS and AS stages were identified. Absolute power (AP) for 1 Hz bins between 1-30 Hz was subjected to PCA to extract independent broad bands.RESULTSPCA rendered three independent broad bands distinct from conventional bands. They explained 82.8% of variance: 2-10 Hz, 10-16 Hz and 17-30 Hz. ANOVAs (group x age x derivations) showed significant higher power at 2-10 Hz with greater age, higher power in QS than AS in all three bands, and significantly higher AP in the left central region, and in the right occipital and temporal areas, in both sleep stages.CONCLUSIONA different method of analyzing sleep EEG generated new information on brain maturation. The Sigma frequencies identified suggest that sleep spindle maturation begins by at least 41 weeks of POST-C age. Inter-hemispheric asymmetries during sleep suggest earlier development of the central left region and the right occipital and temporal areas.
Abstract
Spectral analysis of neonatal sleep is useful for studying brain maturation; however, most studies have analyzed convS†FM_Abstract_Para_FlushLeftentional broad bands described for awake adults, so a distinct approach for EEG analysis may disclose new findings.
STUDY OBJECTIVES
To extract independent EEG broad bands using principal component analysis (PCA) and describe week-by-week EEG changes in quiet (QS) and active sleep (AS) during the first 5 weeks of postnatal life in healthy, full-term newborns.
METHODS
Polysomnography of spontaneous sleep was recorded in 60 newborns in 5 groups at 41, 42, 43, 44 and 45 weeks (n = 12 each) postconceptional age (POST-C). QS and AS stages were identified. Absolute power (AP) for 1 Hz bins between 1-30 Hz was subjected to PCA to extract independent broad bands.
RESULTS
PCA rendered three independent broad bands distinct from conventional bands. They explained 82.8% of variance: 2-10 Hz, 10-16 Hz and 17-30 Hz. ANOVAs (group x age x derivations) showed significant higher power at 2-10 Hz with greater age, higher power in QS than AS in all three bands, and significantly higher AP in the left central region, and in the right occipital and temporal areas, in both sleep stages.
CONCLUSION
A different method of analyzing sleep EEG generated new information on brain maturation. The Sigma frequencies identified suggest that sleep spindle maturation begins by at least 41 weeks of POST-C age. Inter-hemispheric asymmetries during sleep suggest earlier development of the central left region and the right occipital and temporal areas.]]>
Oxford Academic - Advanced Access
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz262/5606928?rss=1 Employer-Mandated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment and Healthcare Cost Savings among Truckers 2019-10-23T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the effect of an employer-mandated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) diagnosis and treatment program on non-OSA-program trucker medical insurance claim costs.MethodsRetrospective cohort analysis; cohorts constructed by matching (randomly, with replacement) Screen-positive Controls (drivers with insurance screened as likely to have OSA, but not yet diagnosed) with Diagnosed drivers (n=1,516; cases=1,224, OSA Negatives=292), on two factors affecting exposure to medical claims: experience level at hire and weeks of job tenure at the Diagnosed driver’s polysomnogram (PSG) date (the “matching date”). All cases received auto-adjusting positive airway pressure (APAP) treatment, and were grouped by objective treatment adherence data: any “Positive Adherence” (n=932) versus “No Adherence” (n=292). Bootstrap resampling produced a difference-in-differences estimate of aggregate non-OSA-program medical insurance claim cost savings for 100 Diagnosed drivers as compared to 100 Screen-positive Controls before and after the PSG/matching date, over an eighteen-month period. A two-part multivariate statistical model was used to set exposures and demographics/-anthropometrics equal across sub-groups, and to generate a difference-in-differences comparison across periods that identified the effect of OSA treatment on per-member per-month costs of an individual driver, separately from cost differences associated with adherence choice.ResultsEighteen-month non-OSA-program medical claim costs savings from diagnosing (and treating as required) 100 Screen-positive Controls: $153,042 (95% CI: -$5,352, $330,525). Model-estimated effect of treatment on those adhering to APAP: -$441 per-member per-month (95% CI: -$861, -$21).ConclusionsResults suggest a carrier-based mandatory OSA program generates substantial savings in non-OSA-program medical insurance claim costs.
Abstract
Objective
To evaluate the effect of an employer-mandated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) diagnosis and treatment program on non-OSA-program trucker medical insurance claim costs.
Methods
Retrospective cohort analysis; cohorts constructed by matching (randomly, with replacement) Screen-positive Controls (drivers with insurance screened as likely to have OSA, but not yet diagnosed) with Diagnosed drivers (n=1,516; cases=1,224, OSA Negatives=292), on two factors affecting exposure to medical claims: experience level at hire and weeks of job tenure at the Diagnosed driver’s polysomnogram (PSG) date (the “matching date”). All cases received auto-adjusting positive airway pressure (APAP) treatment, and were grouped by objective treatment adherence data: any “Positive Adherence” (n=932) versus “No Adherence” (n=292). Bootstrap resampling produced a difference-in-differences estimate of aggregate non-OSA-program medical insurance claim cost savings for 100 Diagnosed drivers as compared to 100 Screen-positive Controls before and after the PSG/matching date, over an eighteen-month period. A two-part multivariate statistical model was used to set exposures and demographics/-anthropometrics equal across sub-groups, and to generate a difference-in-differences comparison across periods that identified the effect of OSA treatment on per-member per-month costs of an individual driver, separately from cost differences associated with adherence choice.
Results
Eighteen-month non-OSA-program medical claim costs savings from diagnosing (and treating as required) 100 Screen-positive Controls: $153,042 (95% CI: -$5,352, $330,525). Model-estimated effect of treatment on those adhering to APAP: -$441 per-member per-month (95% CI: -$861, -$21).
Conclusions
Results suggest a carrier-based mandatory OSA program generates substantial savings in non-OSA-program medical insurance claim costs.]]>
Oxford Academic - Advanced Access
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz254/5602700?rss=1 Wearable Technologies for Developing Sleep and Circadian Biomarkers: A Summary of Workshop Discussions 2019-10-22T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractThe ‘International Biomarkers Workshop on Wearables in Sleep and Circadian Science’ was held at the 2018 SLEEP Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies. The workshop brought together experts in consumer sleep technologies and medical devices, sleep and circadian physiology, clinical translational research, and clinical practice. The goals of the workshop were: 1) characterize the term “wearable” for use in sleep and circadian science, and identify relevant sleep and circadian metrics for wearables to measure; 2) assess the current use of wearables in sleep and circadian science; 3) identify current barriers for applying wearables to sleep and circadian science; and 4) identify goals and opportunities for wearables to advance sleep and circadian science. For the purposes of biomarker development in the sleep and circadian fields, the workshop included the terms “wearables”, “nearables”, and “ingestibles”. Given the state of the current science and technology, the limited validation of wearable devices against gold standard measurements is the primary factor limiting large-scale use of wearable technologies for sleep and circadian research. As such, the workshop committee proposed a set of best practices for validation studies and guidelines regarding how to choose a wearable device for research and clinical use. To complement validation studies, the workshop committee recommends the development of a public data repository for wearable data. Finally, sleep and circadian scientists must actively engage in the development and use of wearable devices to maintain the rigor of scientific findings and public health messages based on wearable technology.
Abstract
The ‘International Biomarkers Workshop on Wearables in Sleep and Circadian Science’ was held at the 2018 SLEEP Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies. The workshop brought together experts in consumer sleep technologies and medical devices, sleep and circadian physiology, clinical translational research, and clinical practice. The goals of the workshop were: 1) characterize the term “wearable” for use in sleep and circadian science, and identify relevant sleep and circadian metrics for wearables to measure; 2) assess the current use of wearables in sleep and circadian science; 3) identify current barriers for applying wearables to sleep and circadian science; and 4) identify goals and opportunities for wearables to advance sleep and circadian science. For the purposes of biomarker development in the sleep and circadian fields, the workshop included the terms “wearables”, “nearables”, and “ingestibles”. Given the state of the current science and technology, the limited validation of wearable devices against gold standard measurements is the primary factor limiting large-scale use of wearable technologies for sleep and circadian research. As such, the workshop committee proposed a set of best practices for validation studies and guidelines regarding how to choose a wearable device for research and clinical use. To complement validation studies, the workshop committee recommends the development of a public data repository for wearable data. Finally, sleep and circadian scientists must actively engage in the development and use of wearable devices to maintain the rigor of scientific findings and public health messages based on wearable technology.]]>
Oxford Academic - Advanced Access
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz251/5601416?rss=1 Measuring the prevalence of sleep disturbances in people with dementia living in care homes: a systematic review and meta-analysis 2019-10-20T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy objectivesSleep disturbances are a feature in people living with dementia, including getting up during the night, difficulty falling asleep, and excessive daytime sleepiness, and may precipitate a person with dementia moving into residential care. There are varying estimates of the frequency of sleep disturbances and it is unknown whether they are a problem for the individual. We conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis on the prevalence and associated factors of sleep disturbances in the care home population with dementia.MethodsWe searched Embase, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO (29/04/2019) for studies of the prevalence or associated factors of sleep disturbances in people with dementia living in care homes. We computed meta-analytical estimates of the prevalence of sleep disturbances and used meta-regression to investigate effects of method of measurement, demographics and study characteristics.ResultsWe included 55 studies of 22,780 participants. The pooled prevalence on validated questionnaires of clinically significant sleep disturbances was 20% (95% Confidence Interval, CI 16-24%) and of any symptom of sleep disturbance was 38% (95% CI 33%-44%). On actigraphy using a cut-off of sleep efficiency
Abstract
Study objectives
Sleep disturbances are a feature in people living with dementia, including getting up during the night, difficulty falling asleep, and excessive daytime sleepiness, and may precipitate a person with dementia moving into residential care. There are varying estimates of the frequency of sleep disturbances and it is unknown whether they are a problem for the individual. We conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis on the prevalence and associated factors of sleep disturbances in the care home population with dementia.
Methods
We searched Embase, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO (29/04/2019) for studies of the prevalence or associated factors of sleep disturbances in people with dementia living in care homes. We computed meta-analytical estimates of the prevalence of sleep disturbances and used meta-regression to investigate effects of method of measurement, demographics and study characteristics.
Results
We included 55 studies of 22,780 participants. The pooled prevalence on validated questionnaires of clinically significant sleep disturbances was 20% (95% Confidence Interval, CI 16-24%) and of any symptom of sleep disturbance was 38% (95% CI 33%-44%). On actigraphy using a cut-off of sleep efficiency <85% prevalence was 70% (95% CI 55-85%). Staff distress, resident agitation and prescription of psychotropic medications were associated with sleep disturbances. Studies with a higher percentage of males had a higher prevalence of sleep disturbance.
Conclusion
Clinically significant sleep disturbances are less common than those measured on actigraphy, and are associated with residents and staff distress, and increased prescription of psychotropics. Actigraphy appears to offer no benefit over proxy reports in this population.]]>
Oxford Academic - Open Access
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz240/5599823?rss=1 Demographics, sleep, and daily patterns of caffeine intake of shift workers in a nationally representative sample of the US Adult population 2019-10-18T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectiveCaffeine is the most widely consumed stimulant in the world and sociodemographic factors including occupation are associated with intake. Shift work, required in various occupations, is associated with poor sleep, inadequate diet, and adverse health effects. Using a large nationally-representative database, demographics, sleep, and caffeine intake of US adults working various shifts were assessed.MethodsThe 24-hour dietary recall data from NHANES 2005-2010 (N=8,500) were used to estimate caffeine intake from foods and beverages. Work shifts were self-reported as: regular day-shift; evening-shift; night-shift; rotating-shift; or other-shift. Regression analyses assessed associations of shift work with caffeine intake after adjustment for sociodemographic factors.ResultsApproximately 74% of employed adults were day-shift workers and 26% were non-day shift workers. Night-shift workers slept for 6.25±0.09 hours per day, somewhat less than day-shift workers who only slept 6.83±0.02 hours (P0.3) to day-shift workers (203±5 mg). Regardless of work schedule, individuals consumed the most caffeine during morning hours. Evening and night-shift workers reported consuming 36-46% less caffeine during their work hours and 72-169% more during non-work hours than day-shift workers. (P
Abstract
Study Objective
Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulant in the world and sociodemographic factors including occupation are associated with intake. Shift work, required in various occupations, is associated with poor sleep, inadequate diet, and adverse health effects. Using a large nationally-representative database, demographics, sleep, and caffeine intake of US adults working various shifts were assessed.
Methods
The 24-hour dietary recall data from NHANES 2005-2010 (N=8,500) were used to estimate caffeine intake from foods and beverages. Work shifts were self-reported as: regular day-shift; evening-shift; night-shift; rotating-shift; or other-shift. Regression analyses assessed associations of shift work with caffeine intake after adjustment for sociodemographic factors.
Results
Approximately 74% of employed adults were day-shift workers and 26% were non-day shift workers. Night-shift workers slept for 6.25±0.09 hours per day, somewhat less than day-shift workers who only slept 6.83±0.02 hours (P<0.0001). Mean 24-hour weekday caffeine intake of evening-, night-, and rotating-shift workers (217±23, 184±19, and 206±15 mg, respectively) was similar (P>0.3) to day-shift workers (203±5 mg). Regardless of work schedule, individuals consumed the most caffeine during morning hours. Evening and night-shift workers reported consuming 36-46% less caffeine during their work hours and 72-169% more during non-work hours than day-shift workers. (P<0.01).
Conclusions
Total daily caffeine intake of shift workers is similar to non-shift workers; most caffeine is consumed in the morning regardless of shift. Since shift workers consume less caffeine during regular work hours and more during non-work hours than day workers, they may be using caffeine to, in part, optimize off-duty alertness.]]>
Oxford Academic - Open Access
https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/hear-from-a-peer-about-srs-membership/ Hear From A Peer About SRS Membership! 2019-10-15T12:21:53.000-05:00 Why are you a member of SRS? We asked this question to Eric Landsness, MD, PhD - member of Sleep Research Society. Dr. Landsness shared his reasoning for being a member of the SRS below and we are proud to share that with you today. Maybe you relate to Dr. Landsness, [...] The post Hear From A Peer About SRS Membership! appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

Why are you a member of SRS?

We asked this question to Eric Landsness, MD, PhD – member of Sleep Research Society. Dr. Landsness shared his reasoning for being a member of the SRS below and we are proud to share that with you today.

Maybe you relate to Dr. Landsness, or perhaps you have a different reason for your interest in SRS. We want to hear them. Send your thoughts to coordinator@srsnet.org and we will share those with the great network that makes up SRS membership.

The post Hear From A Peer About SRS Membership! appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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dtroy Sleep Research Society
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz245/5586795?rss=1 Comparing internet-delivered Cognitive Therapy and Behavior Therapy with telephone support for insomnia disorder: A randomized controlled trial 2019-10-13T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesOur aim was to compare the effects of internet-delivered Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Behavior Therapy (BT) against a waitlist (WL) condition to better understand their unique contribution in the treatment of insomnia.Materials and MethodsTwo hundred and nineteen participants with insomnia disorder were randomized to CT (n=72), BT (n=73) or WL (n=74). The treatment arms consisted of 10 weekly internet-delivered modules with 15 minutes of telephone support per week. At pre, post and follow-up, participants completed measures of insomnia severity, sleep diaries, functional impairment, anxiety, depression, quality of life, adverse events, satisfaction and perception of content, workload, and activity in treatment. Measures of completed exercises, modules, therapist support, and platform logins were also measured at post-treatment.ResultsModerate to large effect sizes for both CT and BT outperformed the WL on the majority of outcomes, with significant differences in favor of both therapy groups. Both treatment groups had significantly larger proportion of treatment remitters (CT: 35.8%, BT: 40%, WL: 2.7%) and responders (CT: 74.6%, BT 58.6%, WL: 10.8%) compared to the waitlist at posttreatment. There were no significant differences between the two therapy groups in terms of outcomes, except for sleep onset latency in favor of BT (6 minutes difference at post-treatment) and adverse events in favor of CT (CT 14.1% vs BT 43.2%).ConclusionsThis study indicates that both internet-delivered CT and BT are effective as stand-alone therapies for insomnia disorder. Results highlights the need for examining which therapy and sub-components that are necessary for change.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Our aim was to compare the effects of internet-delivered Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Behavior Therapy (BT) against a waitlist (WL) condition to better understand their unique contribution in the treatment of insomnia.
Materials and Methods
Two hundred and nineteen participants with insomnia disorder were randomized to CT (n=72), BT (n=73) or WL (n=74). The treatment arms consisted of 10 weekly internet-delivered modules with 15 minutes of telephone support per week. At pre, post and follow-up, participants completed measures of insomnia severity, sleep diaries, functional impairment, anxiety, depression, quality of life, adverse events, satisfaction and perception of content, workload, and activity in treatment. Measures of completed exercises, modules, therapist support, and platform logins were also measured at post-treatment.
Results
Moderate to large effect sizes for both CT and BT outperformed the WL on the majority of outcomes, with significant differences in favor of both therapy groups. Both treatment groups had significantly larger proportion of treatment remitters (CT: 35.8%, BT: 40%, WL: 2.7%) and responders (CT: 74.6%, BT 58.6%, WL: 10.8%) compared to the waitlist at posttreatment. There were no significant differences between the two therapy groups in terms of outcomes, except for sleep onset latency in favor of BT (6 minutes difference at post-treatment) and adverse events in favor of CT (CT 14.1% vs BT 43.2%).
Conclusions
This study indicates that both internet-delivered CT and BT are effective as stand-alone therapies for insomnia disorder. Results highlights the need for examining which therapy and sub-components that are necessary for change.]]>
Oxford Academic - Open Access
https://www.sleepresearchsociety.org/the-value-of-srs-membership/ The Value of SRS Membership 2019-10-09T13:58:12.000-05:00 Sleep Research Society is pleased to welcome everyone to become a member for 2020. Membership is now available on sleepresearchsociety.org. This gives you access to a wide range of valuable benefits that are exclusive to members. Here are just a few you'll miss out on if you are not a member in 2020: Discounts [...] The post The Value of SRS Membership appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

Sleep Research Society is pleased to welcome everyone to become a member for 2020. Membership is now available on sleepresearchsociety.org. This gives you access to a wide range of valuable benefits that are exclusive to members. Here are just a few you’ll miss out on if you are not a member in 2020:

  • Discounts on meetings. This includes the SLEEP 2020 meeting in Philadelphia – the world’s largest meeting devoted to sleep and circadian science.
  • Trainee Awards and SRS Laboratory Directory. These member-only resources help students find mentors and training opportunities.
  • Journal SLEEP access. Members get to view all current and archived issues.
  • PubAlert. This resource scours 100+ journals and notifies you of newly published research articles via email based on your search conditions.
  • Grants and Awards. SRS Members receive exclusive grant and award opportunities unavailable elsewhere and not provided to non-members.

We’ve even made it simple for you to stay a member each year by allowing you to auto-renew or register for a discounted two-year membership.

The post The Value of SRS Membership appeared first on Sleep Research Society.

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lynn Sleep Research Society
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz144/5584064?rss=1 Low-dose risperidone diminishes the intensity and frequency of nightmares in post-traumatic stress disorder 2019-10-08T19:00:00.000-05:00 Nightmares are an intrinsic component of several disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder and night terrors [1] and afflict some 2%–6% of adults [2–4]. The prevalence is higher in veterans who have suffered combat-related trauma [5]. Nightmares are an intrinsic component of several disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder and night terrors [1] and afflict some 2%–6% of adults [2–4]. The prevalence is higher in veterans who have suffered combat-related trauma [5].]]> Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz172/5584057?rss=1 Waking rest: a game changer or a name changer? 2019-10-08T19:00:00.000-05:00 Sleep, exercise, and diet are well-known lifestyle factors associated with health and well-being. In their letter to the editor, Lamp and colleagues [1] propose that waking rest should be a new lifestyle factor considered alongside these traditional lifestyle factors. They define waking rest as a period of quiet, reflective thought that is void of effortful, focused thought, and distracting stimuli (e.g., watching television or using social media). It can include reflection on past experiences or thoughts about the future. The waking rest period can last from 5 to 20 min and can occur at multiple times throughout the day or night. Lamp and colleagues further argue that waking rest can serve to facilitate mental rejuvenation and emotion regulation, thus maintaining proper mental health. Sleep, exercise, and diet are well-known lifestyle factors associated with health and well-being. In their letter to the editor, Lamp and colleagues [1] propose that waking rest should be a new lifestyle factor considered alongside these traditional lifestyle factors. They define waking rest as a period of quiet, reflective thought that is void of effortful, focused thought, and distracting stimuli (e.g., watching television or using social media). It can include reflection on past experiences or thoughts about the future. The waking rest period can last from 5 to 20 min and can occur at multiple times throughout the day or night. Lamp and colleagues further argue that waking rest can serve to facilitate mental rejuvenation and emotion regulation, thus maintaining proper mental health.]]> Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz124/5581967?rss=1 Normative and isolated rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in adults without REM sleep behavior disorder 2019-10-08T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesValues for normative REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) remain unclear. Older age and male sex are associated with greater RSWA, and isolated elevated RSWA has been reported. We aimed to describe normative RSWA and characterize isolated RSWA frequency in adults without REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD).MethodsWe visually quantified phasic, “any,” and tonic RSWA in the submentalis (SM) and anterior tibialis (AT) muscles, and the automated Ferri REM Atonia Index during polysomnography in adults without RBD aged 21–88. We calculated RSWA percentiles across age and sex deciles and compared RSWA in older (≥ 65) versus younger (95th percentile) frequency was also determined.ResultsOverall, 95th percentile RSWA percentages were SM phasic, any, tonic = 8.6%, 9.1%, 0.99%; AT phasic and “any” = 17.0%; combined SM/AT phasic, “any” = 22.3%, 25.5%; and RAI = 0.85. Most phasic RSWA burst durations were ≤1.0 s (85th percentiles: SM = 1.07, AT = 0.86 seconds). Older men had significantly higher AT RSWA than older women and younger patients (all p < 0.04). Twenty-nine (25%, 18 men) had RSWA exceeding the cohort 95th percentile, while 17 (14%, 12 men) fulfilled diagnostic cutoffs for phasic or automated RBD RSWA thresholds.ConclusionsRSWA levels are highest in older men, mirroring the demographic characteristics of RBD, suggesting that older men frequently have altered REM sleep atonia control. These data establish normative adult RSWA values and thresholds for determination of isolated RSWA elevation, potentially aiding RBD diagnosis and discussions concerning incidental RSWA in clinical sleep medicine practice.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Values for normative REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) remain unclear. Older age and male sex are associated with greater RSWA, and isolated elevated RSWA has been reported. We aimed to describe normative RSWA and characterize isolated RSWA frequency in adults without REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD).
Methods
We visually quantified phasic, “any,” and tonic RSWA in the submentalis (SM) and anterior tibialis (AT) muscles, and the automated Ferri REM Atonia Index during polysomnography in adults without RBD aged 21–88. We calculated RSWA percentiles across age and sex deciles and compared RSWA in older (≥ 65) versus younger (<65) men and women. Isolated RSWA (exceeding diagnostic RBD cutoffs, or >95th percentile) frequency was also determined.
Results
Overall, 95th percentile RSWA percentages were SM phasic, any, tonic = 8.6%, 9.1%, 0.99%; AT phasic and “any” = 17.0%; combined SM/AT phasic, “any” = 22.3%, 25.5%; and RAI = 0.85. Most phasic RSWA burst durations were ≤1.0 s (85th percentiles: SM = 1.07, AT = 0.86 seconds). Older men had significantly higher AT RSWA than older women and younger patients (all p < 0.04). Twenty-nine (25%, 18 men) had RSWA exceeding the cohort 95th percentile, while 17 (14%, 12 men) fulfilled diagnostic cutoffs for phasic or automated RBD RSWA thresholds.
Conclusions
RSWA levels are highest in older men, mirroring the demographic characteristics of RBD, suggesting that older men frequently have altered REM sleep atonia control. These data establish normative adult RSWA values and thresholds for determination of isolated RSWA elevation, potentially aiding RBD diagnosis and discussions concerning incidental RSWA in clinical sleep medicine practice.]]>
Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz152/5581969?rss=1 Predictors of long-term adherence to continuous positive airway pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease 2019-10-05T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesPoor adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) commonly affects therapeutic response in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We aimed to determine predictors of adherence to CPAP among participants of the Sleep Apnea and cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) trial.MethodsSAVE was an international, randomized, open trial of CPAP plus usual care versus usual care (UC) alone in participants (45–75 years) with co-occurring moderate-to-severe OSA (≥12 episodes/h of ≥4% oxygen desaturation) and established cardiovascular (CV) disease. Baseline sociodemographic, health and lifestyle factors, OSA symptoms, and 1-month change in daytime sleepiness, as well as CPAP side effects and adherence (during sham screening, titration week, and in the first month), were entered in univariate linear regression analyses to identify predictors of CPAP adherence at 24 months. Variables with p
Abstract
Study Objectives
Poor adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) commonly affects therapeutic response in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We aimed to determine predictors of adherence to CPAP among participants of the Sleep Apnea and cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) trial.
Methods
SAVE was an international, randomized, open trial of CPAP plus usual care versus usual care (UC) alone in participants (45–75 years) with co-occurring moderate-to-severe OSA (≥12 episodes/h of ≥4% oxygen desaturation) and established cardiovascular (CV) disease. Baseline sociodemographic, health and lifestyle factors, OSA symptoms, and 1-month change in daytime sleepiness, as well as CPAP side effects and adherence (during sham screening, titration week, and in the first month), were entered in univariate linear regression analyses to identify predictors of CPAP adherence at 24 months. Variables with p <0.2 were assessed for inclusion in a multivariate linear mixed model with country, age, and sex included a priori and site as a random effect.
Results
Significant univariate predictors of adherence at 24 months in 1,121 participants included: early adherence measures, improvement in daytime sleepiness at 1 month, fixed CPAP pressure, some measures of OSA severity, cardiovascular disease history, breathing pauses, and very loud snoring. While observed adherence varied between countries, adherence during sham screening, initial titration, and the first month of treatment retained independent predictive value in the multivariate model along with fixed CPAP pressure and very loud snoring.
Conclusions
Early CPAP adherence had the greatest predictive value for identifying those at highest risk of non-adherence to long-term CPAP therapy.
Clinical Trial Registration
SAVE is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00738179).]]>
Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-49703-y Sleep stage classification from heart-rate variability using long short-term memory neural networks 2019-10-01T19:00:00.000-05:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz138/5575658?rss=1 Exercise, nutrition, sleep, and waking rest? 2019-09-27T19:00:00.000-05:00 In 2009, the National Sleep Foundation made the case for sleep as the third piece of the puzzle for sustaining mental and physical health and well-being, along with exercise and nutrition [1]. This message has been picked up and carried throughout the media, school curriculums, and sleep campaigns so that now most people consider all three as key factors affecting health and well-being. In 2009, the National Sleep Foundation made the case for sleep as the third piece of the puzzle for sustaining mental and physical health and well-being, along with exercise and nutrition [1]. This message has been picked up and carried throughout the media, school curriculums, and sleep campaigns so that now most people consider all three as key factors affecting health and well-being.]]> Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz138/5575658?rss=1 Exercise, nutrition, sleep, and waking rest? 2019-09-27T19:00:00.000-05:00 Corresponding author. Amanda Lamp, Sleep and Performance Research Center, Department of Medical Education and Clinical Sciences, Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, Washington State University Spokane, 412 E Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane WA 99202. Email: alamp@wsu.edu Corresponding author. Amanda Lamp, Sleep and Performance Research Center, Department of Medical Education and Clinical Sciences, Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, Washington State University Spokane, 412 E Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane WA 99202. Email: alamp@wsu.edu]]> Oxford Academic - Open Access https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz222/5573803?rss=1 Short-term sleep deprivation in mice induces B cell migration to the brain compartment 2019-09-24T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractIncreasing evidence highlight the involvement of immune cells in brain activity and its dysfunction. The brain’s immune compartment is a dynamic ensemble of cells that can fluctuate even in naïve animals. However, the dynamics and factors that can affect the composition of immune cells in the naïve brain are largely unknown. Here we examined whether acute sleep deprivation can affect the brain’s immune compartment (parenchyma, meninges and choroid plexus). Using high-dimensional mass cytometry analysis we broadly characterized the effects of short-term sleep deprivation on the immune composition in the mouse brain. We found that after 6 hours of sleep deprivation there was a significant increase in the abundance of B cells in the brain compartment. This effect can be accounted for, at least in part, by the elevated expression of the migration-related receptor, CXCR5, on B cells and its ligand, cxcl13, in the meninges following sleep deprivation. Thus, our study reveals that short-term sleep deprivation affects the brain’s immune compartment, offering a new insight into how sleep disorders can affect brain function and potentially contribute to neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation.
Abstract
Increasing evidence highlight the involvement of immune cells in brain activity and its dysfunction. The brain’s immune compartment is a dynamic ensemble of cells that can fluctuate even in naïve animals. However, the dynamics and factors that can affect the composition of immune cells in the naïve brain are largely unknown. Here we examined whether acute sleep deprivation can affect the brain’s immune compartment (parenchyma, meninges and choroid plexus). Using high-dimensional mass cytometry analysis we broadly characterized the effects of short-term sleep deprivation on the immune composition in the mouse brain. We found that after 6 hours of sleep deprivation there was a significant increase in the abundance of B cells in the brain compartment. This effect can be accounted for, at least in part, by the elevated expression of the migration-related receptor, CXCR5, on B cells and its ligand, cxcl13, in the meninges following sleep deprivation. Thus, our study reveals that short-term sleep deprivation affects the brain’s immune compartment, offering a new insight into how sleep disorders can affect brain function and potentially contribute to neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation.]]>
Oxford Academic - Open Access
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-50295-w Combined Effects of Having Sleep Problems and Taking Sleeping Pills on the Skeletal Muscle Mass and Performance of Community-Dwelling Elders 2019-09-23T19:00:00.000-05:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz150/5571183?rss=1 Depression prevention via digital cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: a randomized controlled trial 2019-09-16T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesInsomnia is a common precursor to depression; yet, the potential for insomnia treatment to prevent depression has not been demonstrated. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) effectively reduces concurrent symptoms of insomnia and depression and can be delivered digitally (dCBT-I); however, it remains unclear whether treating insomnia leads to sustained reduction and prevention of depression. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of dCBT-I in reducing and preventing depression over a 1-year follow-up period.MethodsPatients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) insomnia disorder were randomly assigned to receive dCBT-I or an attentional control. The follow-up sample included 358 patients in the dCBT-I condition and 300 patients in the online sleep education condition. The primary outcome measure was relative rate ratios for depression at 1-year follow-up. Insomnia responses to treatment were also tested as predictors of incident depression at the 1-year follow-up.ResultsAt 1-year follow-up, depression severity continued to be significantly lower in the dCBT-I condition relative to control. In addition, the number of individuals who reported no depression at 1-year follow-up was 51% higher in the dCBT-I condition relative to control. In those with minimal to no depression at baseline, the incident rate of moderate-to-severe depression at 1-year follow-up was reduced by half in the dCBT-I condition relative to the control condition.ConclusiondCBT-I showed robust effects as an intervention that prevents depression. Future research should examine dose–response requirements and further characterize mechanisms of action of dCBT-I for depression prevention.Clinical TrialSleep to Prevent Evolving Affective Disorders; NCT02988375.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Insomnia is a common precursor to depression; yet, the potential for insomnia treatment to prevent depression has not been demonstrated. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) effectively reduces concurrent symptoms of insomnia and depression and can be delivered digitally (dCBT-I); however, it remains unclear whether treating insomnia leads to sustained reduction and prevention of depression. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of dCBT-I in reducing and preventing depression over a 1-year follow-up period.
Methods
Patients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) insomnia disorder were randomly assigned to receive dCBT-I or an attentional control. The follow-up sample included 358 patients in the dCBT-I condition and 300 patients in the online sleep education condition. The primary outcome measure was relative rate ratios for depression at 1-year follow-up. Insomnia responses to treatment were also tested as predictors of incident depression at the 1-year follow-up.
Results
At 1-year follow-up, depression severity continued to be significantly lower in the dCBT-I condition relative to control. In addition, the number of individuals who reported no depression at 1-year follow-up was 51% higher in the dCBT-I condition relative to control. In those with minimal to no depression at baseline, the incident rate of moderate-to-severe depression at 1-year follow-up was reduced by half in the dCBT-I condition relative to the control condition.
Conclusion
dCBT-I showed robust effects as an intervention that prevents depression. Future research should examine dose–response requirements and further characterize mechanisms of action of dCBT-I for depression prevention.
Clinical Trial
Sleep to Prevent Evolving Affective Disorders; NCT02988375.]]>
Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz150/5571183?rss=1 Depression prevention via digital cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: a randomized controlled trial 2019-09-16T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesInsomnia is a common precursor to depression; yet, the potential for insomnia treatment to prevent depression has not been demonstrated. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) effectively reduces concurrent symptoms of insomnia and depression and can be delivered digitally (dCBT-I); however, it remains unclear whether treating insomnia leads to sustained reduction and prevention of depression. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of dCBT-I in reducing and preventing depression over a 1-year follow-up period.MethodsPatients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) insomnia disorder were randomly assigned to receive dCBT-I or an attentional control. The follow-up sample included 358 patients in the dCBT-I condition and 300 patients in the online sleep education condition. The primary outcome measure was relative rate ratios for depression at 1-year follow-up. Insomnia responses to treatment were also tested as predictors of incident depression at the 1-year follow-up.ResultsAt 1-year follow-up, depression severity continued to be significantly lower in the dCBT-I condition relative to control. In addition, the number of individuals who reported no depression at 1-year follow-up was 51% higher in the dCBT-I condition relative to control. In those with minimal to no depression at baseline, the incident rate of moderate-to-severe depression at 1-year follow-up was reduced by half in the dCBT-I condition relative to the control condition.ConclusiondCBT-I showed robust effects as an intervention that prevents depression. Future research should examine dose–response requirements and further characterize mechanisms of action of dCBT-I for depression prevention.Clinical TrialSleep to Prevent Evolving Affective Disorders; NCT02988375.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Insomnia is a common precursor to depression; yet, the potential for insomnia treatment to prevent depression has not been demonstrated. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) effectively reduces concurrent symptoms of insomnia and depression and can be delivered digitally (dCBT-I); however, it remains unclear whether treating insomnia leads to sustained reduction and prevention of depression. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of dCBT-I in reducing and preventing depression over a 1-year follow-up period.
Methods
Patients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) insomnia disorder were randomly assigned to receive dCBT-I or an attentional control. The follow-up sample included 358 patients in the dCBT-I condition and 300 patients in the online sleep education condition. The primary outcome measure was relative rate ratios for depression at 1-year follow-up. Insomnia responses to treatment were also tested as predictors of incident depression at the 1-year follow-up.
Results
At 1-year follow-up, depression severity continued to be significantly lower in the dCBT-I condition relative to control. In addition, the number of individuals who reported no depression at 1-year follow-up was 51% higher in the dCBT-I condition relative to control. In those with minimal to no depression at baseline, the incident rate of moderate-to-severe depression at 1-year follow-up was reduced by half in the dCBT-I condition relative to the control condition.
Conclusion
dCBT-I showed robust effects as an intervention that prevents depression. Future research should examine dose–response requirements and further characterize mechanisms of action of dCBT-I for depression prevention.
Clinical Trial
Sleep to Prevent Evolving Affective Disorders; NCT02988375.]]>
Oxford Academic - Editor's Choice
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need How Much Sleep Do We Really Need? 2019-09-01T15:28:43.000-05:00 How Much Sleep Do We Really Need? Image admin Sun, 09/01/2019 - 13:28 Sleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well-being. We spend up to one-third of our lives asleep, and the overall state of our "sleep health" remains an essential question throughout our lifespan. Most of us know that getting a good night’s sleep is important, but too few of us actually make those eight or so hours between the sheets a priority. For many of us with sleep debt, we’ve forgotten what “being really, truly rested” feels like. To further complicate matters, stimulants like coffee and energy drinks, alarm clocks, and external lights—including those from electronic devices—interferes with our "circadian rhythm" or natural sleep/wake cycle. Sleep needs vary across ages and are especially impacted by lifestyle and health. To determine how much sleep you need, it's important to assess not only where you fall on the "sleep needs spectrum," but also to examine what lifestyle factors are affecting the quality and quantity of your sleep such as work schedules and stress. To get the sleep you need, you must look at the big picture. How Much Sleep Do We Really Need: Revisited The National Sleep Foundation released the results of a world-class study that took more than two How Much Sleep Do We Really Need?
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admin Sun, 09/01/2019 - 13:28
Sleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well-being. We spend up to one-third of our lives asleep, and the overall state of our "sleep health" remains an essential question throughout our lifespan. Most of us know that getting a good night’s sleep is important, but too few of us actually make those eight or so hours between the sheets a priority. For many of us with sleep debt, we’ve forgotten what “being really, truly rested” feels like. To further complicate matters, stimulants like coffee and energy drinks, alarm clocks, and external lights—including those from electronic devices—interferes with our "circadian rhythm" or natural sleep/wake cycle. Sleep needs vary across ages and are especially impacted by lifestyle and health. To determine how much sleep you need, it's important to assess not only where you fall on the "sleep needs spectrum," but also to examine what lifestyle factors are affecting the quality and quantity of your sleep such as work schedules and stress. To get the sleep you need, you must look at the big picture. How Much Sleep Do We Really Need: Revisited The National Sleep Foundation released the results of a world-class study that took more than two
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admin NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need How Much Sleep Do We Really Need? 2019-09-01T15:28:43.000-05:00 How Much Sleep Do We Really Need? Image admin Sun, 09/01/2019 - 13:28 Sleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well-being. We spend up to one-third of our lives asleep, and the overall state of our "sleep health" remains an essential question throughout our lifespan. Most of us know that getting a good night’s sleep is important, but too few of us actually make those eight or so hours between the sheets a priority. For many of us with sleep debt, we’ve forgotten what “being really, truly rested” feels like. To further complicate matters, stimulants like coffee and energy drinks, alarm clocks, and external lights—including those from electronic devices—interferes with our "circadian rhythm" or natural sleep/wake cycle. Sleep needs vary across ages and are especially impacted by lifestyle and health. To determine how much sleep you need, it's important to assess not only where you fall on the "sleep needs spectrum," but also to examine what lifestyle factors are affecting the quality and quantity of your sleep such as work schedules and stress. To get the sleep you need, you must look at the big picture. How Much Sleep Do We Really Need: Revisited The National Sleep Foundation released the results of a world-class study that took more than two How Much Sleep Do We Really Need?
Image
admin Sun, 09/01/2019 - 13:28
Sleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well-being. We spend up to one-third of our lives asleep, and the overall state of our "sleep health" remains an essential question throughout our lifespan. Most of us know that getting a good night’s sleep is important, but too few of us actually make those eight or so hours between the sheets a priority. For many of us with sleep debt, we’ve forgotten what “being really, truly rested” feels like. To further complicate matters, stimulants like coffee and energy drinks, alarm clocks, and external lights—including those from electronic devices—interferes with our "circadian rhythm" or natural sleep/wake cycle. Sleep needs vary across ages and are especially impacted by lifestyle and health. To determine how much sleep you need, it's important to assess not only where you fall on the "sleep needs spectrum," but also to examine what lifestyle factors are affecting the quality and quantity of your sleep such as work schedules and stress. To get the sleep you need, you must look at the big picture. How Much Sleep Do We Really Need: Revisited The National Sleep Foundation released the results of a world-class study that took more than two
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admin Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need How Much Sleep Do We Really Need? 2019-09-01T15:28:43.000-05:00 How Much Sleep Do We Really Need? Image admin Sun, 09/01/2019 - 13:28 Sleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well-being. We spend up to one-third of our lives asleep, and the overall state of our "sleep health" remains an essential question throughout our lifespan. Most of us know that getting a good night’s sleep is important, but too few of us actually make those eight or so hours between the sheets a priority. For many of us with sleep debt, we’ve forgotten what “being really, truly rested” feels like. To further complicate matters, stimulants like coffee and energy drinks, alarm clocks, and external lights—including those from electronic devices—interferes with our "circadian rhythm" or natural sleep/wake cycle. Sleep needs vary across ages and are especially impacted by lifestyle and health. To determine how much sleep you need, it's important to assess not only where you fall on the "sleep needs spectrum," but also to examine what lifestyle factors are affecting the quality and quantity of your sleep such as work schedules and stress. To get the sleep you need, you must look at the big picture. How Much Sleep Do We Really Need: Revisited The National Sleep Foundation released the results of a world-class study that took more than two How Much Sleep Do We Really Need?
Image
admin
Sun, 09/01/2019 - 13:28
Sleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well-being. We spend up to one-third of our lives asleep, and the overall state of our "sleep health" remains an essential question throughout our lifespan. Most of us know that getting a good night’s sleep is important, but too few of us actually make those eight or so hours between the sheets a priority. For many of us with sleep debt, we’ve forgotten what “being really, truly rested” feels like. To further complicate matters, stimulants like coffee and energy drinks, alarm clocks, and external lights—including those from electronic devices—interferes with our "circadian rhythm" or natural sleep/wake cycle. Sleep needs vary across ages and are especially impacted by lifestyle and health. To determine how much sleep you need, it's important to assess not only where you fall on the "sleep needs spectrum," but also to examine what lifestyle factors are affecting the quality and quantity of your sleep such as work schedules and stress. To get the sleep you need, you must look at the big picture. How Much Sleep Do We Really Need: Revisited The National Sleep Foundation released the results of a world-class study that took more than two
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admin NSF Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/nsf-tool-get-right-amount-sleep NSF Tool to Get the Right Amount of Sleep 2019-08-30T07:38:15.000-05:00 NSF Tool to Get the Right Amount of Sleep Image inne Fri, 08/30/2019 - 05:38 How much sleep do you want? NSF’s Bedtime Calculator™ is now available to help you figure out what time to go to bed or wake up for better sleep health. As a sleeping tool, the Bedtime Calculator conveniently calculates what time you should go to sleep or wake up based on the number of sleeping hours you want. NSF is making this tool available free to the public in its effort to promote public awareness of the need for sufficient, restful sleep for individual and societal health and safety. The Bedroom Calculator is available at sleepfoundation.org/bedtimecalculator . NSF encourages everyone to get the sleep they need. NSF recommends 7-9 hours of sleep for adults aged 18-64 and 7-8 hours for older adults aged 65 and over. To get a good night’s sleep, follow these simple and effective sleep tips: Stick to a sleep schedule, even on weekends. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. Exercise daily. Evaluate your bedroom to ensure ideal temperature, sound and light. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows. Beware of hidden sleep stealers, like alcohol and caffeine. Turn off electronics before bed. NSF Tool to Get the Right Amount of Sleep
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inne Fri, 08/30/2019 - 05:38
How much sleep do you want? NSF’s Bedtime Calculator™ is now available to help you figure out what time to go to bed or wake up for better sleep health. As a sleeping tool, the Bedtime Calculator conveniently calculates what time you should go to sleep or wake up based on the number of sleeping hours you want. NSF is making this tool available free to the public in its effort to promote public awareness of the need for sufficient, restful sleep for individual and societal health and safety. The Bedroom Calculator is available at sleepfoundation.org/bedtimecalculator . NSF encourages everyone to get the sleep they need. NSF recommends 7-9 hours of sleep for adults aged 18-64 and 7-8 hours for older adults aged 65 and over. To get a good night’s sleep, follow these simple and effective sleep tips: Stick to a sleep schedule, even on weekends. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. Exercise daily. Evaluate your bedroom to ensure ideal temperature, sound and light. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows. Beware of hidden sleep stealers, like alcohol and caffeine. Turn off electronics before bed.
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inne NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/nsf-tool-get-right-amount-sleep NSF Tool to Get the Right Amount of Sleep 2019-08-30T07:38:15.000-05:00 NSF Tool to Get the Right Amount of Sleep Image inne Fri, 08/30/2019 - 05:38 How much sleep do you want? NSF’s Bedtime Calculator™ is now available to help you figure out what time to go to bed or wake up for better sleep health. As a sleeping tool, the Bedtime Calculator conveniently calculates what time you should go to sleep or wake up based on the number of sleeping hours you want. NSF is making this tool available free to the public in its effort to promote public awareness of the need for sufficient, restful sleep for individual and societal health and safety. The Bedroom Calculator is available at sleepfoundation.org/bedtimecalculator . NSF encourages everyone to get the sleep they need. NSF recommends 7-9 hours of sleep for adults aged 18-64 and 7-8 hours for older adults aged 65 and over. To get a good night’s sleep, follow these simple and effective sleep tips: Stick to a sleep schedule, even on weekends. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. Exercise daily. Evaluate your bedroom to ensure ideal temperature, sound and light. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows. Beware of hidden sleep stealers, like alcohol and caffeine. Turn off electronics before bed. NSF Tool to Get the Right Amount of Sleep
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inne Fri, 08/30/2019 - 05:38
How much sleep do you want? NSF’s Bedtime Calculator™ is now available to help you figure out what time to go to bed or wake up for better sleep health. As a sleeping tool, the Bedtime Calculator conveniently calculates what time you should go to sleep or wake up based on the number of sleeping hours you want. NSF is making this tool available free to the public in its effort to promote public awareness of the need for sufficient, restful sleep for individual and societal health and safety. The Bedroom Calculator is available at sleepfoundation.org/bedtimecalculator . NSF encourages everyone to get the sleep they need. NSF recommends 7-9 hours of sleep for adults aged 18-64 and 7-8 hours for older adults aged 65 and over. To get a good night’s sleep, follow these simple and effective sleep tips: Stick to a sleep schedule, even on weekends. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. Exercise daily. Evaluate your bedroom to ensure ideal temperature, sound and light. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows. Beware of hidden sleep stealers, like alcohol and caffeine. Turn off electronics before bed.
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inne Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/nsf-tool-get-right-amount-sleep NSF Tool to Get the Right Amount of Sleep 2019-08-30T07:38:15.000-05:00 NSF Tool to Get the Right Amount of Sleep Image inne Fri, 08/30/2019 - 05:38 How much sleep do you want? NSF’s Bedtime Calculator™ is now available to help you figure out what time to go to bed or wake up for better sleep health. As a sleeping tool, the Bedtime Calculator conveniently calculates what time you should go to sleep or wake up based on the number of sleeping hours you want. NSF is making this tool available free to the public in its effort to promote public awareness of the need for sufficient, restful sleep for individual and societal health and safety. The Bedroom Calculator is available at sleepfoundation.org/bedtimecalculator . NSF encourages everyone to get the sleep they need. NSF recommends 7-9 hours of sleep for adults aged 18-64 and 7-8 hours for older adults aged 65 and over. To get a good night’s sleep, follow these simple and effective sleep tips: Stick to a sleep schedule, even on weekends. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. Exercise daily. Evaluate your bedroom to ensure ideal temperature, sound and light. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows. Beware of hidden sleep stealers, like alcohol and caffeine. Turn off electronics before bed. NSF Tool to Get the Right Amount of Sleep
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inne
Fri, 08/30/2019 - 05:38
How much sleep do you want? NSF’s Bedtime Calculator™ is now available to help you figure out what time to go to bed or wake up for better sleep health. As a sleeping tool, the Bedtime Calculator conveniently calculates what time you should go to sleep or wake up based on the number of sleeping hours you want. NSF is making this tool available free to the public in its effort to promote public awareness of the need for sufficient, restful sleep for individual and societal health and safety. The Bedroom Calculator is available at sleepfoundation.org/bedtimecalculator . NSF encourages everyone to get the sleep they need. NSF recommends 7-9 hours of sleep for adults aged 18-64 and 7-8 hours for older adults aged 65 and over. To get a good night’s sleep, follow these simple and effective sleep tips: Stick to a sleep schedule, even on weekends. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. Exercise daily. Evaluate your bedroom to ensure ideal temperature, sound and light. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows. Beware of hidden sleep stealers, like alcohol and caffeine. Turn off electronics before bed.
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inne NSF Sleep News
https://myapnea.org/blog/obviously-not Obviously Not 2019-08-20T23:00:00.000-05:00 Not so obvious reminders for planning for the unknown when living with CPAP I don’t know how you are but sometimes the obvious is not at all obvious to me. I use a CPAP machine faithfully and have for several years. Honestly, I do not sleep well at all without it. With that said, I never thought about what I would do if I didn’t have it available or if I lost it.

Recently I had a small stroke. My main concern was taking two baby aspirin and getting to the emergency room. I did grab my phone and charger (like any wise person would) and my insurance card but that was all. There was a flurry of activity in the ER; explaining my symptoms, inserting an IV, going for a CT scan and talking with a neurologist about taking the TPA clot busting shot. Before I knew it, they were transporting me by air ambulance to another hospital. There I had another CT scan, was taken to ICU and was pretty much out of it. Thoughts and words were there—just very slow.

My family got there only to be told that I needed silence and rest. Before they left they asked what I needed for the next day and I told them nothing yet. Here’s where the first obvious need wasn’t obvious to me. I didn’t have my CPAP. My family knows I need and rely on that machine but they didn’t think about it either. In fact, I didn’t think about it until almost midnight when it hit me that another reason why I was so restless and uncomfortable (besides nurses coming in to poke and prod) was that I wasn’t using my CPAP. In fact, my lovely CPAP was almost two hours away!

Fortunately, the hospital was able to get one for me to use. Unfortunately, it wasn’t MY machine or MY mask. It didn’t fit well and the humidifier was set too high. It made noises mine didn’t. The hose was too long and got tangled in my IV lines. Plus, I knew it would be one more expensive expense.

Even more recently, we took some time off to regroup and restore by taking a trip with our camper. I made sure to take my CPAP along and all was going great until a storm hit and we had to evacuate the camper. Again, I grabbed my phone and charger. Silly me. Once we were safe, I remembered my poor machine left behind in the camper, sure it would be blown away to Oz. It wasn’t and all was well except again the obvious was not obvious to me. Here are the obvious things I intend to do for the future:

  1. Write down the kind of mask I use and the machine information. Keep one copy in my purse (next to my insurance card) and give one to my husband. This is in case they are stolen, lost or destroyed.
  2. Make sure my family knows that the main thing I need (if ever in a situation like the hospital again) is my machine and mask. I found out that the hospital charges less for toothpaste, toothbrush and funny underwear than for CPAP machine use.
  3. Think about investing in a necklace or bracelet that lets emergency people know I use CPAP. It may never happen but there could be a time when there is no one (including myself) that can tell anyone that I need CPAP.
  4. For everyone, remember just how important using your CPAP is for your overall health. This is even more important if you find yourself in the hospital with other health issues. I’m sure other have good, obvious suggestions for situations like these and others. Share them please, so we can all learn!

The same moon shines over us all,

Ruby

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RebeccaR My Apnea
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-excessive-sleep-can-affect-your-metabolism How Excessive Sleep Can Affect Your Metabolism 2019-08-14T13:14:34.000-05:00 How Excessive Sleep Can Affect Your Metabolism Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:14 Few people worry about spending too much time in bed. An extra hour or two of stolen sleep on Sunday can feel like heaven after a long week of work and family activities. But did you know that clocking more than the recommended amount can negatively impact your health? For most adults, getting between seven and nine hours of sleep a night is ideal. Although a small percentage of people actually need 10 hours, for most adults sleeping more hours than the recommended amount may indicate an underlying health concern. In addition, regularly sleeping more than the suggested amount may increase the risk of obesity , headache, back pain, and heart disease. And a recent study discovered that oversleeping can put the body at risk for metabolic issues. Learn more about how excessive sleep can impact your metabolism. What the Science Says In a recent study, researchers analyzed the health, medical histories, and sleep totals of a group of more than 130,000 men and women ages 40 to 69. With this data, researchers were able to link sleeping less than six hours, as well as sleeping more than 10 hours, to cases of metabolic syndrome and related symptoms. Understanding Metabolic Syndrome People How Excessive Sleep Can Affect Your Metabolism
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azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:14
Few people worry about spending too much time in bed. An extra hour or two of stolen sleep on Sunday can feel like heaven after a long week of work and family activities. But did you know that clocking more than the recommended amount can negatively impact your health? For most adults, getting between seven and nine hours of sleep a night is ideal. Although a small percentage of people actually need 10 hours, for most adults sleeping more hours than the recommended amount may indicate an underlying health concern. In addition, regularly sleeping more than the suggested amount may increase the risk of obesity , headache, back pain, and heart disease. And a recent study discovered that oversleeping can put the body at risk for metabolic issues. Learn more about how excessive sleep can impact your metabolism. What the Science Says In a recent study, researchers analyzed the health, medical histories, and sleep totals of a group of more than 130,000 men and women ages 40 to 69. With this data, researchers were able to link sleeping less than six hours, as well as sleeping more than 10 hours, to cases of metabolic syndrome and related symptoms. Understanding Metabolic Syndrome People
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azra NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-excessive-sleep-can-affect-your-metabolism How Excessive Sleep Can Affect Your Metabolism 2019-08-14T13:14:34.000-05:00 How Excessive Sleep Can Affect Your Metabolism Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:14 Few people worry about spending too much time in bed. An extra hour or two of stolen sleep on Sunday can feel like heaven after a long week of work and family activities. But did you know that clocking more than the recommended amount can negatively impact your health? For most adults, getting between seven and nine hours of sleep a night is ideal. Although a small percentage of people actually need 10 hours, for most adults sleeping more hours than the recommended amount may indicate an underlying health concern. In addition, regularly sleeping more than the suggested amount may increase the risk of obesity , headache, back pain, and heart disease. And a recent study discovered that oversleeping can put the body at risk for metabolic issues. Learn more about how excessive sleep can impact your metabolism. What the Science Says In a recent study, researchers analyzed the health, medical histories, and sleep totals of a group of more than 130,000 men and women ages 40 to 69. With this data, researchers were able to link sleeping less than six hours, as well as sleeping more than 10 hours, to cases of metabolic syndrome and related symptoms. Understanding Metabolic Syndrome People How Excessive Sleep Can Affect Your Metabolism
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azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:14
Few people worry about spending too much time in bed. An extra hour or two of stolen sleep on Sunday can feel like heaven after a long week of work and family activities. But did you know that clocking more than the recommended amount can negatively impact your health? For most adults, getting between seven and nine hours of sleep a night is ideal. Although a small percentage of people actually need 10 hours, for most adults sleeping more hours than the recommended amount may indicate an underlying health concern. In addition, regularly sleeping more than the suggested amount may increase the risk of obesity , headache, back pain, and heart disease. And a recent study discovered that oversleeping can put the body at risk for metabolic issues. Learn more about how excessive sleep can impact your metabolism. What the Science Says In a recent study, researchers analyzed the health, medical histories, and sleep totals of a group of more than 130,000 men and women ages 40 to 69. With this data, researchers were able to link sleeping less than six hours, as well as sleeping more than 10 hours, to cases of metabolic syndrome and related symptoms. Understanding Metabolic Syndrome People
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azra Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-excessive-sleep-can-affect-your-metabolism How Excessive Sleep Can Affect Your Metabolism 2019-08-14T13:14:34.000-05:00 How Excessive Sleep Can Affect Your Metabolism Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:14 Few people worry about spending too much time in bed. An extra hour or two of stolen sleep on Sunday can feel like heaven after a long week of work and family activities. But did you know that clocking more than the recommended amount can negatively impact your health? For most adults, getting between seven and nine hours of sleep a night is ideal. Although a small percentage of people actually need 10 hours, for most adults sleeping more hours than the recommended amount may indicate an underlying health concern. In addition, regularly sleeping more than the suggested amount may increase the risk of obesity , headache, back pain, and heart disease. And a recent study discovered that oversleeping can put the body at risk for metabolic issues. Learn more about how excessive sleep can impact your metabolism. What the Science Says In a recent study, researchers analyzed the health, medical histories, and sleep totals of a group of more than 130,000 men and women ages 40 to 69. With this data, researchers were able to link sleeping less than six hours, as well as sleeping more than 10 hours, to cases of metabolic syndrome and related symptoms. Understanding Metabolic Syndrome People How Excessive Sleep Can Affect Your Metabolism
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azra
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:14
Few people worry about spending too much time in bed. An extra hour or two of stolen sleep on Sunday can feel like heaven after a long week of work and family activities. But did you know that clocking more than the recommended amount can negatively impact your health? For most adults, getting between seven and nine hours of sleep a night is ideal. Although a small percentage of people actually need 10 hours, for most adults sleeping more hours than the recommended amount may indicate an underlying health concern. In addition, regularly sleeping more than the suggested amount may increase the risk of obesity , headache, back pain, and heart disease. And a recent study discovered that oversleeping can put the body at risk for metabolic issues. Learn more about how excessive sleep can impact your metabolism. What the Science Says In a recent study, researchers analyzed the health, medical histories, and sleep totals of a group of more than 130,000 men and women ages 40 to 69. With this data, researchers were able to link sleeping less than six hours, as well as sleeping more than 10 hours, to cases of metabolic syndrome and related symptoms. Understanding Metabolic Syndrome People
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azra NSF Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/screen-time-and-insomnia-what-it-means-teens Screen Time and Insomnia: What It Means for Teens 2019-08-14T13:06:34.000-05:00 Screen Time and Insomnia: What It Means for Teens Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:06 For teenagers, sleep plays a critical role in staying healthy, feeling happy, maintaining good grades, and doing well in sports. But sleep doesn’t come easily for some teens. For those who struggle, it’s important to look at their electronic use . An increased amount of screen time throughout the day has been linked to insomnia and symptoms of depression in adolescents. This can include social messaging, web surfing, watching TV, and gaming, in addition to using the internet for schoolwork. The presence of electronic devices in teenagers’ lives isn’t going anywhere, anytime soon, so it’s important to understand its effects on sleep and how to find a better balance. The Blue Light Effect Electronic devices emit an artificial blue light that can suppress the release of the body’s sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin. In turn, this can interfere with the body’s natural internal clock that signals when it’s time to sleep and wake up. The more time teens spend in front of an electronic device, especially in the evening, the greater the delay in the release of melatonin, making sleep a challenge. They may experience problems falling asleep as well as difficulty staying asleep. As a result, Screen Time and Insomnia: What It Means for Teens
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azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:06
For teenagers, sleep plays a critical role in staying healthy, feeling happy, maintaining good grades, and doing well in sports. But sleep doesn’t come easily for some teens. For those who struggle, it’s important to look at their electronic use . An increased amount of screen time throughout the day has been linked to insomnia and symptoms of depression in adolescents. This can include social messaging, web surfing, watching TV, and gaming, in addition to using the internet for schoolwork. The presence of electronic devices in teenagers’ lives isn’t going anywhere, anytime soon, so it’s important to understand its effects on sleep and how to find a better balance. The Blue Light Effect Electronic devices emit an artificial blue light that can suppress the release of the body’s sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin. In turn, this can interfere with the body’s natural internal clock that signals when it’s time to sleep and wake up. The more time teens spend in front of an electronic device, especially in the evening, the greater the delay in the release of melatonin, making sleep a challenge. They may experience problems falling asleep as well as difficulty staying asleep. As a result,
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azra NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/screen-time-and-insomnia-what-it-means-teens Screen Time and Insomnia: What It Means for Teens 2019-08-14T13:06:34.000-05:00 Screen Time and Insomnia: What It Means for Teens Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:06 For teenagers, sleep plays a critical role in staying healthy, feeling happy, maintaining good grades, and doing well in sports. But sleep doesn’t come easily for some teens. For those who struggle, it’s important to look at their electronic use . An increased amount of screen time throughout the day has been linked to insomnia and symptoms of depression in adolescents. This can include social messaging, web surfing, watching TV, and gaming, in addition to using the internet for schoolwork. The presence of electronic devices in teenagers’ lives isn’t going anywhere, anytime soon, so it’s important to understand its effects on sleep and how to find a better balance. The Blue Light Effect Electronic devices emit an artificial blue light that can suppress the release of the body’s sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin. In turn, this can interfere with the body’s natural internal clock that signals when it’s time to sleep and wake up. The more time teens spend in front of an electronic device, especially in the evening, the greater the delay in the release of melatonin, making sleep a challenge. They may experience problems falling asleep as well as difficulty staying asleep. As a result, Screen Time and Insomnia: What It Means for Teens
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azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:06
For teenagers, sleep plays a critical role in staying healthy, feeling happy, maintaining good grades, and doing well in sports. But sleep doesn’t come easily for some teens. For those who struggle, it’s important to look at their electronic use . An increased amount of screen time throughout the day has been linked to insomnia and symptoms of depression in adolescents. This can include social messaging, web surfing, watching TV, and gaming, in addition to using the internet for schoolwork. The presence of electronic devices in teenagers’ lives isn’t going anywhere, anytime soon, so it’s important to understand its effects on sleep and how to find a better balance. The Blue Light Effect Electronic devices emit an artificial blue light that can suppress the release of the body’s sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin. In turn, this can interfere with the body’s natural internal clock that signals when it’s time to sleep and wake up. The more time teens spend in front of an electronic device, especially in the evening, the greater the delay in the release of melatonin, making sleep a challenge. They may experience problems falling asleep as well as difficulty staying asleep. As a result,
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azra Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/screen-time-and-insomnia-what-it-means-teens Screen Time and Insomnia: What It Means for Teens 2019-08-14T13:06:34.000-05:00 Screen Time and Insomnia: What It Means for Teens Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:06 For teenagers, sleep plays a critical role in staying healthy, feeling happy, maintaining good grades, and doing well in sports. But sleep doesn’t come easily for some teens. For those who struggle, it’s important to look at their electronic use . An increased amount of screen time throughout the day has been linked to insomnia and symptoms of depression in adolescents. This can include social messaging, web surfing, watching TV, and gaming, in addition to using the internet for schoolwork. The presence of electronic devices in teenagers’ lives isn’t going anywhere, anytime soon, so it’s important to understand its effects on sleep and how to find a better balance. The Blue Light Effect Electronic devices emit an artificial blue light that can suppress the release of the body’s sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin. In turn, this can interfere with the body’s natural internal clock that signals when it’s time to sleep and wake up. The more time teens spend in front of an electronic device, especially in the evening, the greater the delay in the release of melatonin, making sleep a challenge. They may experience problems falling asleep as well as difficulty staying asleep. As a result, Screen Time and Insomnia: What It Means for Teens
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azra
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:06
For teenagers, sleep plays a critical role in staying healthy, feeling happy, maintaining good grades, and doing well in sports. But sleep doesn’t come easily for some teens. For those who struggle, it’s important to look at their electronic use . An increased amount of screen time throughout the day has been linked to insomnia and symptoms of depression in adolescents. This can include social messaging, web surfing, watching TV, and gaming, in addition to using the internet for schoolwork. The presence of electronic devices in teenagers’ lives isn’t going anywhere, anytime soon, so it’s important to understand its effects on sleep and how to find a better balance. The Blue Light Effect Electronic devices emit an artificial blue light that can suppress the release of the body’s sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin. In turn, this can interfere with the body’s natural internal clock that signals when it’s time to sleep and wake up. The more time teens spend in front of an electronic device, especially in the evening, the greater the delay in the release of melatonin, making sleep a challenge. They may experience problems falling asleep as well as difficulty staying asleep. As a result,
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azra NSF Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/your-body-no-sleep This Is Your Body on No Sleep 2019-08-14T13:01:10.000-05:00 This Is Your Body on No Sleep Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:01 A missed night of sleep is a fairly common experience for young people, new parents, and all kinds of busy adults. And while sometimes it’s because you’re having fun (New Year’s Eve!) and other times it’s because you must (an infant in the house), the end result of a sleepless night is the same: Your body has been deprived of an essential component for good health and energy. Most adults do best with between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, but nearly 30 percent get less than six, and some occasionally miss a night entirely, resulting in a slow accumulation of sleep debt that can affect your appearance, your immune system, and even the way your brain functions. Read on to discover a few of the ways a sleepless night affects your body. Dark Circles Puffy eyes and a pasty complexion aren’t what you want to see when you wake up in the morning, but your appearance can be affected when you get too little sleep. Missing a night’s sleep can cause fluid to accumulate below your eyes, leading to circles and swelling. Hunger Pangs Lack of sleep changes the way your body interprets hunger signals, leaving you with cravings that can be hard to control. In fact, women who sleep five hours This Is Your Body on No Sleep
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azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:01
A missed night of sleep is a fairly common experience for young people, new parents, and all kinds of busy adults. And while sometimes it’s because you’re having fun (New Year’s Eve!) and other times it’s because you must (an infant in the house), the end result of a sleepless night is the same: Your body has been deprived of an essential component for good health and energy. Most adults do best with between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, but nearly 30 percent get less than six, and some occasionally miss a night entirely, resulting in a slow accumulation of sleep debt that can affect your appearance, your immune system, and even the way your brain functions. Read on to discover a few of the ways a sleepless night affects your body. Dark Circles Puffy eyes and a pasty complexion aren’t what you want to see when you wake up in the morning, but your appearance can be affected when you get too little sleep. Missing a night’s sleep can cause fluid to accumulate below your eyes, leading to circles and swelling. Hunger Pangs Lack of sleep changes the way your body interprets hunger signals, leaving you with cravings that can be hard to control. In fact, women who sleep five hours
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azra NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/your-body-no-sleep This Is Your Body on No Sleep 2019-08-14T13:01:10.000-05:00 This Is Your Body on No Sleep Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:01 A missed night of sleep is a fairly common experience for young people, new parents, and all kinds of busy adults. And while sometimes it’s because you’re having fun (New Year’s Eve!) and other times it’s because you must (an infant in the house), the end result of a sleepless night is the same: Your body has been deprived of an essential component for good health and energy. Most adults do best with between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, but nearly 30 percent get less than six, and some occasionally miss a night entirely, resulting in a slow accumulation of sleep debt that can affect your appearance, your immune system, and even the way your brain functions. Read on to discover a few of the ways a sleepless night affects your body. Dark Circles Puffy eyes and a pasty complexion aren’t what you want to see when you wake up in the morning, but your appearance can be affected when you get too little sleep. Missing a night’s sleep can cause fluid to accumulate below your eyes, leading to circles and swelling. Hunger Pangs Lack of sleep changes the way your body interprets hunger signals, leaving you with cravings that can be hard to control. In fact, women who sleep five hours This Is Your Body on No Sleep
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azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:01
A missed night of sleep is a fairly common experience for young people, new parents, and all kinds of busy adults. And while sometimes it’s because you’re having fun (New Year’s Eve!) and other times it’s because you must (an infant in the house), the end result of a sleepless night is the same: Your body has been deprived of an essential component for good health and energy. Most adults do best with between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, but nearly 30 percent get less than six, and some occasionally miss a night entirely, resulting in a slow accumulation of sleep debt that can affect your appearance, your immune system, and even the way your brain functions. Read on to discover a few of the ways a sleepless night affects your body. Dark Circles Puffy eyes and a pasty complexion aren’t what you want to see when you wake up in the morning, but your appearance can be affected when you get too little sleep. Missing a night’s sleep can cause fluid to accumulate below your eyes, leading to circles and swelling. Hunger Pangs Lack of sleep changes the way your body interprets hunger signals, leaving you with cravings that can be hard to control. In fact, women who sleep five hours
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azra Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/your-body-no-sleep This Is Your Body on No Sleep 2019-08-14T13:01:10.000-05:00 This Is Your Body on No Sleep Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:01 A missed night of sleep is a fairly common experience for young people, new parents, and all kinds of busy adults. And while sometimes it’s because you’re having fun (New Year’s Eve!) and other times it’s because you must (an infant in the house), the end result of a sleepless night is the same: Your body has been deprived of an essential component for good health and energy. Most adults do best with between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, but nearly 30 percent get less than six, and some occasionally miss a night entirely, resulting in a slow accumulation of sleep debt that can affect your appearance, your immune system, and even the way your brain functions. Read on to discover a few of the ways a sleepless night affects your body. Dark Circles Puffy eyes and a pasty complexion aren’t what you want to see when you wake up in the morning, but your appearance can be affected when you get too little sleep. Missing a night’s sleep can cause fluid to accumulate below your eyes, leading to circles and swelling. Hunger Pangs Lack of sleep changes the way your body interprets hunger signals, leaving you with cravings that can be hard to control. In fact, women who sleep five hours This Is Your Body on No Sleep
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azra
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 11:01
A missed night of sleep is a fairly common experience for young people, new parents, and all kinds of busy adults. And while sometimes it’s because you’re having fun (New Year’s Eve!) and other times it’s because you must (an infant in the house), the end result of a sleepless night is the same: Your body has been deprived of an essential component for good health and energy. Most adults do best with between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, but nearly 30 percent get less than six, and some occasionally miss a night entirely, resulting in a slow accumulation of sleep debt that can affect your appearance, your immune system, and even the way your brain functions. Read on to discover a few of the ways a sleepless night affects your body. Dark Circles Puffy eyes and a pasty complexion aren’t what you want to see when you wake up in the morning, but your appearance can be affected when you get too little sleep. Missing a night’s sleep can cause fluid to accumulate below your eyes, leading to circles and swelling. Hunger Pangs Lack of sleep changes the way your body interprets hunger signals, leaving you with cravings that can be hard to control. In fact, women who sleep five hours
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azra NSF Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/four-common-causes-night-sweats Four Common Causes of Night Sweats 2019-08-14T12:48:49.000-05:00 Four Common Causes of Night Sweats Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:48 If you frequently find yourself waking up drenched in perspiration, it’s likely that you suffer from night sweats. Also known as sleep hyperhidrosis, this condition involves repeated episodes of extreme sweating that can leave your sheets drenched. Night sweats differ from the occasional experience of waking up sweaty due to sleeping under heavy blankets or in a room that’s just too warm ; with night sweats, perspiration is likely to be unrelated to your bedroom environment and more apt to be connected to an underlying medical condition. Learn more about the causes of night sweats, and effective strategies for dealing with them. Medication Certain medications are known to be associated with night sweats. For example, patients taking antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, may experience night sweats. Medicines taken to lower fevers (such as aspirin or acetaminophen) may ironically also cause sweating. If you experience night sweats for longer than a few weeks, talk to your doctor about adjusting your medication. Infection Many infections can cause a fever, which in turn leads to night sweats. Tuberculosis, bacterial infections, and human immunodeficiency Four Common Causes of Night Sweats
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azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:48
If you frequently find yourself waking up drenched in perspiration, it’s likely that you suffer from night sweats. Also known as sleep hyperhidrosis, this condition involves repeated episodes of extreme sweating that can leave your sheets drenched. Night sweats differ from the occasional experience of waking up sweaty due to sleeping under heavy blankets or in a room that’s just too warm ; with night sweats, perspiration is likely to be unrelated to your bedroom environment and more apt to be connected to an underlying medical condition. Learn more about the causes of night sweats, and effective strategies for dealing with them. Medication Certain medications are known to be associated with night sweats. For example, patients taking antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, may experience night sweats. Medicines taken to lower fevers (such as aspirin or acetaminophen) may ironically also cause sweating. If you experience night sweats for longer than a few weeks, talk to your doctor about adjusting your medication. Infection Many infections can cause a fever, which in turn leads to night sweats. Tuberculosis, bacterial infections, and human immunodeficiency
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azra NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/four-common-causes-night-sweats Four Common Causes of Night Sweats 2019-08-14T12:48:49.000-05:00 Four Common Causes of Night Sweats Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:48 If you frequently find yourself waking up drenched in perspiration, it’s likely that you suffer from night sweats. Also known as sleep hyperhidrosis, this condition involves repeated episodes of extreme sweating that can leave your sheets drenched. Night sweats differ from the occasional experience of waking up sweaty due to sleeping under heavy blankets or in a room that’s just too warm ; with night sweats, perspiration is likely to be unrelated to your bedroom environment and more apt to be connected to an underlying medical condition. Learn more about the causes of night sweats, and effective strategies for dealing with them. Medication Certain medications are known to be associated with night sweats. For example, patients taking antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, may experience night sweats. Medicines taken to lower fevers (such as aspirin or acetaminophen) may ironically also cause sweating. If you experience night sweats for longer than a few weeks, talk to your doctor about adjusting your medication. Infection Many infections can cause a fever, which in turn leads to night sweats. Tuberculosis, bacterial infections, and human immunodeficiency Four Common Causes of Night Sweats
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NSF
azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:48
If you frequently find yourself waking up drenched in perspiration, it’s likely that you suffer from night sweats. Also known as sleep hyperhidrosis, this condition involves repeated episodes of extreme sweating that can leave your sheets drenched. Night sweats differ from the occasional experience of waking up sweaty due to sleeping under heavy blankets or in a room that’s just too warm ; with night sweats, perspiration is likely to be unrelated to your bedroom environment and more apt to be connected to an underlying medical condition. Learn more about the causes of night sweats, and effective strategies for dealing with them. Medication Certain medications are known to be associated with night sweats. For example, patients taking antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, may experience night sweats. Medicines taken to lower fevers (such as aspirin or acetaminophen) may ironically also cause sweating. If you experience night sweats for longer than a few weeks, talk to your doctor about adjusting your medication. Infection Many infections can cause a fever, which in turn leads to night sweats. Tuberculosis, bacterial infections, and human immunodeficiency
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azra Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/four-common-causes-night-sweats Four Common Causes of Night Sweats 2019-08-14T12:48:49.000-05:00 Four Common Causes of Night Sweats Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:48 If you frequently find yourself waking up drenched in perspiration, it’s likely that you suffer from night sweats. Also known as sleep hyperhidrosis, this condition involves repeated episodes of extreme sweating that can leave your sheets drenched. Night sweats differ from the occasional experience of waking up sweaty due to sleeping under heavy blankets or in a room that’s just too warm ; with night sweats, perspiration is likely to be unrelated to your bedroom environment and more apt to be connected to an underlying medical condition. Learn more about the causes of night sweats, and effective strategies for dealing with them. Medication Certain medications are known to be associated with night sweats. For example, patients taking antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, may experience night sweats. Medicines taken to lower fevers (such as aspirin or acetaminophen) may ironically also cause sweating. If you experience night sweats for longer than a few weeks, talk to your doctor about adjusting your medication. Infection Many infections can cause a fever, which in turn leads to night sweats. Tuberculosis, bacterial infections, and human immunodeficiency Four Common Causes of Night Sweats
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NSF
azra
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:48
If you frequently find yourself waking up drenched in perspiration, it’s likely that you suffer from night sweats. Also known as sleep hyperhidrosis, this condition involves repeated episodes of extreme sweating that can leave your sheets drenched. Night sweats differ from the occasional experience of waking up sweaty due to sleeping under heavy blankets or in a room that’s just too warm ; with night sweats, perspiration is likely to be unrelated to your bedroom environment and more apt to be connected to an underlying medical condition. Learn more about the causes of night sweats, and effective strategies for dealing with them. Medication Certain medications are known to be associated with night sweats. For example, patients taking antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, may experience night sweats. Medicines taken to lower fevers (such as aspirin or acetaminophen) may ironically also cause sweating. If you experience night sweats for longer than a few weeks, talk to your doctor about adjusting your medication. Infection Many infections can cause a fever, which in turn leads to night sweats. Tuberculosis, bacterial infections, and human immunodeficiency
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azra NSF Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-your-body-uses-calories-while-you-sleep How Your Body Uses Calories While You Sleep 2019-08-14T12:20:58.000-05:00 How Your Body Uses Calories While You Sleep Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:20 Burning calories is a term most often associated with aerobic exercise and physically taxing jobs. But actually, you don’t need to be engaged in strenuous activity to burn calories. Your body uses them up around the clock, even when you are asleep. Learn more about the functions your body performs at night, and exactly how it uses calories while you sleep. How REM Uses Energy Despite the fact that you are resting, your body still consumes energy when you sleep. Energy use is particularly high during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep . During this time, your brain is highly active and you burn the most glucose, your body’s source of fuel. Your heart rate and blood pressure also rise during this time, which burns more calories. Other Calorie-Burning Activities During Sleep During the night, your body goes to work repairing any damage done on a cellular level during your waking hours. For instance, if you exercise during the day, your muscles will recover and repair themselves at night, which requires energy. Food digestion also uses energy, as your body breaks down your meal into usable fuel for the following day. How Many Calories Can You Burn? The amount of energy you use during sleep How Your Body Uses Calories While You Sleep
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azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:20
Burning calories is a term most often associated with aerobic exercise and physically taxing jobs. But actually, you don’t need to be engaged in strenuous activity to burn calories. Your body uses them up around the clock, even when you are asleep. Learn more about the functions your body performs at night, and exactly how it uses calories while you sleep. How REM Uses Energy Despite the fact that you are resting, your body still consumes energy when you sleep. Energy use is particularly high during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep . During this time, your brain is highly active and you burn the most glucose, your body’s source of fuel. Your heart rate and blood pressure also rise during this time, which burns more calories. Other Calorie-Burning Activities During Sleep During the night, your body goes to work repairing any damage done on a cellular level during your waking hours. For instance, if you exercise during the day, your muscles will recover and repair themselves at night, which requires energy. Food digestion also uses energy, as your body breaks down your meal into usable fuel for the following day. How Many Calories Can You Burn? The amount of energy you use during sleep
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azra NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-your-body-uses-calories-while-you-sleep How Your Body Uses Calories While You Sleep 2019-08-14T12:20:58.000-05:00 How Your Body Uses Calories While You Sleep Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:20 Burning calories is a term most often associated with aerobic exercise and physically taxing jobs. But actually, you don’t need to be engaged in strenuous activity to burn calories. Your body uses them up around the clock, even when you are asleep. Learn more about the functions your body performs at night, and exactly how it uses calories while you sleep. How REM Uses Energy Despite the fact that you are resting, your body still consumes energy when you sleep. Energy use is particularly high during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep . During this time, your brain is highly active and you burn the most glucose, your body’s source of fuel. Your heart rate and blood pressure also rise during this time, which burns more calories. Other Calorie-Burning Activities During Sleep During the night, your body goes to work repairing any damage done on a cellular level during your waking hours. For instance, if you exercise during the day, your muscles will recover and repair themselves at night, which requires energy. Food digestion also uses energy, as your body breaks down your meal into usable fuel for the following day. How Many Calories Can You Burn? The amount of energy you use during sleep How Your Body Uses Calories While You Sleep
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azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:20
Burning calories is a term most often associated with aerobic exercise and physically taxing jobs. But actually, you don’t need to be engaged in strenuous activity to burn calories. Your body uses them up around the clock, even when you are asleep. Learn more about the functions your body performs at night, and exactly how it uses calories while you sleep. How REM Uses Energy Despite the fact that you are resting, your body still consumes energy when you sleep. Energy use is particularly high during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep . During this time, your brain is highly active and you burn the most glucose, your body’s source of fuel. Your heart rate and blood pressure also rise during this time, which burns more calories. Other Calorie-Burning Activities During Sleep During the night, your body goes to work repairing any damage done on a cellular level during your waking hours. For instance, if you exercise during the day, your muscles will recover and repair themselves at night, which requires energy. Food digestion also uses energy, as your body breaks down your meal into usable fuel for the following day. How Many Calories Can You Burn? The amount of energy you use during sleep
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azra Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-your-body-uses-calories-while-you-sleep How Your Body Uses Calories While You Sleep 2019-08-14T12:20:58.000-05:00 How Your Body Uses Calories While You Sleep Image azra Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:20 Burning calories is a term most often associated with aerobic exercise and physically taxing jobs. But actually, you don’t need to be engaged in strenuous activity to burn calories. Your body uses them up around the clock, even when you are asleep. Learn more about the functions your body performs at night, and exactly how it uses calories while you sleep. How REM Uses Energy Despite the fact that you are resting, your body still consumes energy when you sleep. Energy use is particularly high during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep . During this time, your brain is highly active and you burn the most glucose, your body’s source of fuel. Your heart rate and blood pressure also rise during this time, which burns more calories. Other Calorie-Burning Activities During Sleep During the night, your body goes to work repairing any damage done on a cellular level during your waking hours. For instance, if you exercise during the day, your muscles will recover and repair themselves at night, which requires energy. Food digestion also uses energy, as your body breaks down your meal into usable fuel for the following day. How Many Calories Can You Burn? The amount of energy you use during sleep How Your Body Uses Calories While You Sleep
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azra
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:20
Burning calories is a term most often associated with aerobic exercise and physically taxing jobs. But actually, you don’t need to be engaged in strenuous activity to burn calories. Your body uses them up around the clock, even when you are asleep. Learn more about the functions your body performs at night, and exactly how it uses calories while you sleep. How REM Uses Energy Despite the fact that you are resting, your body still consumes energy when you sleep. Energy use is particularly high during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep . During this time, your brain is highly active and you burn the most glucose, your body’s source of fuel. Your heart rate and blood pressure also rise during this time, which burns more calories. Other Calorie-Burning Activities During Sleep During the night, your body goes to work repairing any damage done on a cellular level during your waking hours. For instance, if you exercise during the day, your muscles will recover and repair themselves at night, which requires energy. Food digestion also uses energy, as your body breaks down your meal into usable fuel for the following day. How Many Calories Can You Burn? The amount of energy you use during sleep
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azra NSF Sleep News
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/08/190814081209.htm Type 2 diabetes and sleep problems in midlife women 2019-08-14T07:12:09.000-05:00 Hormone changes are known to alter insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, as well as interfere with women's sleep patterns. But little was known about the association between diabetes and sleep disturbances during the menopause transition until now, as a new study concludes that women with diabetes are at greater risk for sleep disturbances. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/08/190813101936.htm Treat insomnia before sleep apnea 2019-08-13T09:19:36.000-05:00 The 'double whammy' of co-occurring insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea is a complex problem best managed with non-drug targeted psych interventions, a new study has found. By following simple new guidelines, people with the concurrent conditions reported great improvement to both their sleep, and their health -- with about 50% improvement in global insomnia severity and night-time insomnia after 6 months. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz177/5549537?rss=1 Sleep duration and quality are not associated with brown adipose tissue volume or activity - as determined by 18F-FDG uptake, in young, sedentary adults 2019-08-12T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractObjectivesShort sleep duration and sleep disturbances have been related to obesity and metabolic disruption. However, the behavioural and physiological mechanisms linking sleep and alterations in energy balance and metabolism are incompletely understood. In rodents, sleep regulation is closely related to appropriate brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenic activity, but whether the same is true in humans has remained unknown. The present work examines whether sleep duration and quality are related to BAT volume and activity (measured by 18F-FDG) and BAT radiodensity in humans.MethodsA total of 118 healthy adults (69% women, 21.9±2.2 years, BMI: 24.9±4.7 kg/m2) participated in this cross-sectional study. Sleep duration and other sleep variables were measured using a wrist-worn accelerometer for 7 consecutive days for 24 h/day. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to assess sleep quality. All participants then underwent a personalized cold exposure to determine their BAT volume, activity and radiodensity (a proxy of the intracellular triglyceride content), using static positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography scan.ResultsNeither sleep duration nor quality were associated with BAT volume nor activity (the latter represented by the mean and peak standardized 18F-FDG uptake values), nor radiodensity (all P >0.1). The lack of association remained after adjusting the analyses for sex, date of PET/CT, and body composition.ConclusionsWhile experiments in rodent models indicate a strong relationship to exist between sleep regulation and BAT function, it seems that sleep duration and quality may not be directly related to the BAT variables examined in the present work.
Abstract
Objectives
Short sleep duration and sleep disturbances have been related to obesity and metabolic disruption. However, the behavioural and physiological mechanisms linking sleep and alterations in energy balance and metabolism are incompletely understood. In rodents, sleep regulation is closely related to appropriate brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenic activity, but whether the same is true in humans has remained unknown. The present work examines whether sleep duration and quality are related to BAT volume and activity (measured by 18F-FDG) and BAT radiodensity in humans.
Methods
A total of 118 healthy adults (69% women, 21.9±2.2 years, BMI: 24.9±4.7 kg/m2) participated in this cross-sectional study. Sleep duration and other sleep variables were measured using a wrist-worn accelerometer for 7 consecutive days for 24 h/day. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to assess sleep quality. All participants then underwent a personalized cold exposure to determine their BAT volume, activity and radiodensity (a proxy of the intracellular triglyceride content), using static positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography scan.
Results
Neither sleep duration nor quality were associated with BAT volume nor activity (the latter represented by the mean and peak standardized 18F-FDG uptake values), nor radiodensity (all P>0.1). The lack of association remained after adjusting the analyses for sex, date of PET/CT, and body composition.
Conclusions
While experiments in rodent models indicate a strong relationship to exist between sleep regulation and BAT function, it seems that sleep duration and quality may not be directly related to the BAT variables examined in the present work.]]>
Oxford Academic - Open Access
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz180/5549536?rss=1 Sleep stage prediction with raw acceleration and photoplethysmography heart rate data derived from a consumer wearable device 2019-08-12T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractWearable, multisensor, consumer devices that estimate sleep are now commonplace, but the algorithms used by these devices to score sleep are not open source, and the raw sensor data is rarely accessible for external use. As a result, these devices are limited in their usefulness for clinical and research applications, despite holding much promise. We used a mobile application of our own creation to collect raw acceleration data and heart rate from the Apple Watch worn by participants undergoing polysomnography, as well as during the ambulatory period preceding in lab testing. Using this data, we compared the contributions of multiple features (motion, local standard deviation in heart rate, and “clock proxy”) to performance across several classifiers. Best performance was achieved using neural nets, though the differences across classifiers were generally small. For sleep-wake classification, our method scored 90% of epochs correctly, with 59.6% of true wake epochs (specificity) and 93% of true sleep epochs (sensitivity) scored correctly. Accuracy for differentiating wake, NREM sleep, and REM sleep was approximately 72% when all features were used. We generalized our results by testing the models trained on Apple Watch data using data from the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), and found that we were able to predict sleep with performance comparable to testing on our own dataset. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the ability to analyze raw acceleration and heart rate data from a ubiquitous wearable device with accepted, disclosed mathematical methods to improve accuracy of sleep and sleep stage prediction.
Abstract
Wearable, multisensor, consumer devices that estimate sleep are now commonplace, but the algorithms used by these devices to score sleep are not open source, and the raw sensor data is rarely accessible for external use. As a result, these devices are limited in their usefulness for clinical and research applications, despite holding much promise. We used a mobile application of our own creation to collect raw acceleration data and heart rate from the Apple Watch worn by participants undergoing polysomnography, as well as during the ambulatory period preceding in lab testing. Using this data, we compared the contributions of multiple features (motion, local standard deviation in heart rate, and “clock proxy”) to performance across several classifiers. Best performance was achieved using neural nets, though the differences across classifiers were generally small. For sleep-wake classification, our method scored 90% of epochs correctly, with 59.6% of true wake epochs (specificity) and 93% of true sleep epochs (sensitivity) scored correctly. Accuracy for differentiating wake, NREM sleep, and REM sleep was approximately 72% when all features were used. We generalized our results by testing the models trained on Apple Watch data using data from the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), and found that we were able to predict sleep with performance comparable to testing on our own dataset. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the ability to analyze raw acceleration and heart rate data from a ubiquitous wearable device with accepted, disclosed mathematical methods to improve accuracy of sleep and sleep stage prediction.]]>
Oxford Academic - Open Access
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11456-7 Genome-wide association analysis of self-reported daytime sleepiness identifies 42 loci that suggest biological subtypes 2019-08-12T19:00:00.000-05:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz148/5542813?rss=1 Extreme morning chronotypes are often familial and not exceedingly rare: the estimated prevalence of advanced sleep phase, familial advanced sleep phase, and advanced sleep–wake phase disorder in a sleep clinic population 2019-08-05T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesReport the first prevalence estimates of advanced sleep phase (ASP), familial advanced sleep phase (FASP), and advanced sleep–wake phase disorder (ASWPD). This can guide clinicians on the utility of screening for extreme chronotypes both for clinical decision-making and to flag prospective participants in the study of the genetics and biology of FASP.MethodsData on morning or evening sleep schedule preference (chronotype) were collected from 2422 new patients presenting to a North American sleep center over 9.8 years. FASP was determined using a severity criterion that has previously identified dominant circadian mutations in humans. All patients were personally seen and evaluated by one of the authors (C.R.J.).ResultsOur results demonstrate an ASP prevalence of 0.33%, an FASP prevalence of 0.21%, and an ASWPD prevalence of at least 0.04%. Most cases of young-onset ASP were familial.ConclusionsAmong patients presenting to a sleep clinic, conservatively 1 out of every 300 patients will have ASP, 1 out of every 475 will have FASP, and 1 out of every 2500 will have ASWPD. This supports obtaining a routine circadian history and, for those with extreme chronotypes, obtaining a family history of circadian preference. This can optimize treatment for evening sleepiness and early morning awakening and lead to additional circadian gene discovery. We hope these findings will lead to improved treatment options for a wide range of sleep and medical disorders in the future.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Report the first prevalence estimates of advanced sleep phase (ASP), familial advanced sleep phase (FASP), and advanced sleep–wake phase disorder (ASWPD). This can guide clinicians on the utility of screening for extreme chronotypes both for clinical decision-making and to flag prospective participants in the study of the genetics and biology of FASP.
Methods
Data on morning or evening sleep schedule preference (chronotype) were collected from 2422 new patients presenting to a North American sleep center over 9.8 years. FASP was determined using a severity criterion that has previously identified dominant circadian mutations in humans. All patients were personally seen and evaluated by one of the authors (C.R.J.).
Results
Our results demonstrate an ASP prevalence of 0.33%, an FASP prevalence of 0.21%, and an ASWPD prevalence of at least 0.04%. Most cases of young-onset ASP were familial.
Conclusions
Among patients presenting to a sleep clinic, conservatively 1 out of every 300 patients will have ASP, 1 out of every 475 will have FASP, and 1 out of every 2500 will have ASWPD. This supports obtaining a routine circadian history and, for those with extreme chronotypes, obtaining a family history of circadian preference. This can optimize treatment for evening sleepiness and early morning awakening and lead to additional circadian gene discovery. We hope these findings will lead to improved treatment options for a wide range of sleep and medical disorders in the future.]]>
Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz135/5542780?rss=1 NMDAR activation regulates the daily rhythms of sleep and mood 2019-07-31T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesThe present studies examine the effects of NMDAR activation by NYX-2925 diurnal rhythmicity of both sleep and wake as well as emotion.MethodsTwenty-four-hour sleep EEG recordings were obtained in sleep-deprived and non-sleep-deprived rats. In addition, the day–night cycle of both activity and mood was measured using home cage ultrasonic-vocalization recordings.ResultsNYX-2925 significantly facilitated non-REM (NREM) sleep during the lights-on (sleep) period, and this effect persisted for 3 days following a single dose in sleep-deprived rats. Sleep-bout duration and REM latencies were increased without affecting total REM sleep, suggesting better sleep quality. In addition, delta power during wake was decreased, suggesting less drowsiness. NYX-2925 also rescued learning and memory deficits induced by sleep deprivation, measured using an NMDAR-dependent learning task. Additionally, NYX-2925 increased positive affect and decreased negative affect, primarily by facilitating the transitions from sleep to rough-and-tumble play and back to sleep. In contrast to NYX-2925, the NMDAR antagonist ketamine acutely (1–4 hours post-dosing) suppressed REM and non-REM sleep, increased delta power during wake, and blunted the amplitude of the sleep-wake activity rhythm.DiscussionThese data suggest that NYX-2925 could enhance behavioral plasticity via improved sleep quality as well as vigilance during wake. As such, the facilitation of sleep by NYX-2925 has the potential to both reduce symptom burden on neurological and psychiatric disorders as well as serve as a biomarker for drug effects through restoration of sleep architecture.
Abstract
Study Objectives
The present studies examine the effects of NMDAR activation by NYX-2925 diurnal rhythmicity of both sleep and wake as well as emotion.
Methods
Twenty-four-hour sleep EEG recordings were obtained in sleep-deprived and non-sleep-deprived rats. In addition, the day–night cycle of both activity and mood was measured using home cage ultrasonic-vocalization recordings.
Results
NYX-2925 significantly facilitated non-REM (NREM) sleep during the lights-on (sleep) period, and this effect persisted for 3 days following a single dose in sleep-deprived rats. Sleep-bout duration and REM latencies were increased without affecting total REM sleep, suggesting better sleep quality. In addition, delta power during wake was decreased, suggesting less drowsiness. NYX-2925 also rescued learning and memory deficits induced by sleep deprivation, measured using an NMDAR-dependent learning task. Additionally, NYX-2925 increased positive affect and decreased negative affect, primarily by facilitating the transitions from sleep to rough-and-tumble play and back to sleep. In contrast to NYX-2925, the NMDAR antagonist ketamine acutely (1–4 hours post-dosing) suppressed REM and non-REM sleep, increased delta power during wake, and blunted the amplitude of the sleep-wake activity rhythm.
Discussion
These data suggest that NYX-2925 could enhance behavioral plasticity via improved sleep quality as well as vigilance during wake. As such, the facilitation of sleep by NYX-2925 has the potential to both reduce symptom burden on neurological and psychiatric disorders as well as serve as a biomarker for drug effects through restoration of sleep architecture.]]>
Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz151/5541565?rss=1 Identification of subgroups of chemotherapy patients with distinct sleep disturbance profiles and associated co-occurring symptoms 2019-07-29T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesPurposes of this study were to identify subgroups of patients with distinct sleep disturbance profiles and to evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and various sleep characteristics, as well for differences in the severity of co-occurring symptoms among these subgroups.MethodsOutpatients with breast, gynecological, gastrointestinal, or lung cancer (n = 1331) completed questionnaires six times over two chemotherapy cycles. Self-reported sleep disturbance was evaluated using the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS). Latent profile analysis was used to identify distinct subgroups.ResultsThree latent classes with distinct sleep disturbance profiles were identified (Low [25.5%], High [50.8%], Very High [24.0%]) across the six assessments. Approximately 75% of the patients had a mean total GSDS score that was above the clinically meaningful cutoff score of at least 43 across all six assessments. Compared to the Low class, patients in High and Very High classes were significantly younger, had a lower functional status, had higher levels of comorbidity, and were more likely to be female, more likely to have childcare responsibilities, less likely to be employed, and less likely to have gastrointestinal cancer. For all of the GSDS subscale and total scores, significant differences among the latent classes followed the expected pattern (Low < High < Very High). For trait and state anxiety, depressive symptoms, morning and evening fatigue, decrements in attentional function, and decrements in morning and evening energy, significant differences among the latent classes followed the expected pattern (Low < High < Very High).ConclusionsClinicians need to perform in-depth assessments of sleep disturbance and co-occurring symptoms to identify high-risk patients and recommend appropriate interventions.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Purposes of this study were to identify subgroups of patients with distinct sleep disturbance profiles and to evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and various sleep characteristics, as well for differences in the severity of co-occurring symptoms among these subgroups.
Methods
Outpatients with breast, gynecological, gastrointestinal, or lung cancer (n = 1331) completed questionnaires six times over two chemotherapy cycles. Self-reported sleep disturbance was evaluated using the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS). Latent profile analysis was used to identify distinct subgroups.
Results
Three latent classes with distinct sleep disturbance profiles were identified (Low [25.5%], High [50.8%], Very High [24.0%]) across the six assessments. Approximately 75% of the patients had a mean total GSDS score that was above the clinically meaningful cutoff score of at least 43 across all six assessments. Compared to the Low class, patients in High and Very High classes were significantly younger, had a lower functional status, had higher levels of comorbidity, and were more likely to be female, more likely to have childcare responsibilities, less likely to be employed, and less likely to have gastrointestinal cancer. For all of the GSDS subscale and total scores, significant differences among the latent classes followed the expected pattern (Low < High < Very High). For trait and state anxiety, depressive symptoms, morning and evening fatigue, decrements in attentional function, and decrements in morning and evening energy, significant differences among the latent classes followed the expected pattern (Low < High < Very High).
Conclusions
Clinicians need to perform in-depth assessments of sleep disturbance and co-occurring symptoms to identify high-risk patients and recommend appropriate interventions.]]>
Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz149/5541558?rss=1 Sleep debt: the impact of weekday sleep deprivation on cardiovascular health in older women 2019-07-29T19:00:00.000-05:00 AbstractStudy ObjectivesShort sleep duration is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, it is uncertain whether sleep debt, a measure of sleep deficiency during the week compared to the weekend, confers increased cardiovascular risk. Because sleep disturbances increase with age particularly in women, we examined the relationship between sleep debt and ideal cardiovascular health (ICH) in older women.MethodsSleep debt is defined as the difference between self-reported total weekday and weekend sleep hours of at least 2 hours among women without apparent CVD and cancer participating in the Women’s Health Stress Study follow-up cohort of female health professionals (N = 22 082). The ICH consisted of seven health factors and behaviors as defined by the American Heart Association Strategic 2020 goals including body mass index, smoking, physical activity, diet, blood pressure, total cholesterol, and glucose.ResultsMean age was 72.1 ± 6.0 years. Compared to women with no sleep debt, women with sleep debt were more likely to be obese and have hypertension (pall < .05). Linear regression models adjusted for age and race/ethnicity revealed that sleep debt was significantly associated with poorer ICH (B = –0.13 [95% CI = –0.18 to –0.08]). The relationship was attenuated but remained significant after adjustment for education, income, depression/anxiety, cumulative stress, and snoring.ConclusionSleep debt was associated with poorer ICH, despite taking into account socioeconomic status and psychosocial factors. These results suggest that weekly sleep duration variation, possibly leading to circadian misalignment, may be associated with cardiovascular risk in older women.
Abstract
Study Objectives
Short sleep duration is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, it is uncertain whether sleep debt, a measure of sleep deficiency during the week compared to the weekend, confers increased cardiovascular risk. Because sleep disturbances increase with age particularly in women, we examined the relationship between sleep debt and ideal cardiovascular health (ICH) in older women.
Methods
Sleep debt is defined as the difference between self-reported total weekday and weekend sleep hours of at least 2 hours among women without apparent CVD and cancer participating in the Women’s Health Stress Study follow-up cohort of female health professionals (N = 22 082). The ICH consisted of seven health factors and behaviors as defined by the American Heart Association Strategic 2020 goals including body mass index, smoking, physical activity, diet, blood pressure, total cholesterol, and glucose.
Results
Mean age was 72.1 ± 6.0 years. Compared to women with no sleep debt, women with sleep debt were more likely to be obese and have hypertension (pall < .05). Linear regression models adjusted for age and race/ethnicity revealed that sleep debt was significantly associated with poorer ICH (B = –0.13 [95% CI = –0.18 to –0.08]). The relationship was attenuated but remained significant after adjustment for education, income, depression/anxiety, cumulative stress, and snoring.
Conclusion
Sleep debt was associated with poorer ICH, despite taking into account socioeconomic status and psychosocial factors. These results suggest that weekly sleep duration variation, possibly leading to circadian misalignment, may be associated with cardiovascular risk in older women.]]>
Oxford Academic - Latest Issue of Sleep
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190723104041.htm Obstructive sleep apnea may be one reason depression treatment doesn't work 2019-07-23T09:40:41.000-05:00 When someone is depressed and having suicidal thoughts or their depression treatment just isn't working, their caregivers might want to check to see if they have obstructive sleep apnea, investigators say. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea https://www.nature.com/articles/s41582-019-0226-9 Narcolepsy — clinical spectrum, aetiopathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment 2019-07-18T19:00:00.000-05:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190716103405.htm Poor sleep quality and fatigue plague women with premature ovarian insufficiency 2019-07-16T09:34:05.000-05:00 Sleep disturbances are a frequent complaint of women in the menopause transition and postmenopause. A new study demonstrates that women with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) who are receiving hormone therapy have poorer sleep quality and greater fatigue than women of the same age with preserved ovarian function. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/do-lucid-dreams-affect-sleep-quality Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality? 2019-07-09T14:06:50.000-05:00 Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality? Image azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 12:06 Good sleep quality is critical when it comes to health and wellness. But lucid dreams—extremely vivid reveries where the dreamer is aware that he or she is dreaming—can be stimulating, so it’s natural to wonder whether sleep quality is affected. Although most people don’t have them every night, lucid dreams are fairly common: About 55 percent of people say they’ve had at least one. Learn more about this unusual nighttime phenomenon and how it may impact your sleep quality. What’s Behind Lucid Dreams Although the exact cause of this type of dream is still to be determined, certain factors make them more likely. For instance, if you have narcolepsy —a condition that causes people to suddenly and quickly fall into a deep sleep—you might be more likely to experience lucid dreaming. This is because narcoleptics tend to drop into REM sleep right away, and it’s during this sleep stage that lucid dreams occur. How Sleep Quality Is Affected An all-too-real dream can also wake you up and make it hard to get back to sleep, which is less than ideal for your sleep quality. Another potential sleep challenge: Because people who have lucid dreams are aware that they are dreaming, many have some Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality?
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azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 12:06
Good sleep quality is critical when it comes to health and wellness. But lucid dreams—extremely vivid reveries where the dreamer is aware that he or she is dreaming—can be stimulating, so it’s natural to wonder whether sleep quality is affected. Although most people don’t have them every night, lucid dreams are fairly common: About 55 percent of people say they’ve had at least one. Learn more about this unusual nighttime phenomenon and how it may impact your sleep quality. What’s Behind Lucid Dreams Although the exact cause of this type of dream is still to be determined, certain factors make them more likely. For instance, if you have narcolepsy —a condition that causes people to suddenly and quickly fall into a deep sleep—you might be more likely to experience lucid dreaming. This is because narcoleptics tend to drop into REM sleep right away, and it’s during this sleep stage that lucid dreams occur. How Sleep Quality Is Affected An all-too-real dream can also wake you up and make it hard to get back to sleep, which is less than ideal for your sleep quality. Another potential sleep challenge: Because people who have lucid dreams are aware that they are dreaming, many have some
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azra NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/do-lucid-dreams-affect-sleep-quality Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality? 2019-07-09T14:06:50.000-05:00 Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality? Image azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 12:06 Good sleep quality is critical when it comes to health and wellness. But lucid dreams—extremely vivid reveries where the dreamer is aware that he or she is dreaming—can be stimulating, so it’s natural to wonder whether sleep quality is affected. Although most people don’t have them every night, lucid dreams are fairly common: About 55 percent of people say they’ve had at least one. Learn more about this unusual nighttime phenomenon and how it may impact your sleep quality. What’s Behind Lucid Dreams Although the exact cause of this type of dream is still to be determined, certain factors make them more likely. For instance, if you have narcolepsy —a condition that causes people to suddenly and quickly fall into a deep sleep—you might be more likely to experience lucid dreaming. This is because narcoleptics tend to drop into REM sleep right away, and it’s during this sleep stage that lucid dreams occur. How Sleep Quality Is Affected An all-too-real dream can also wake you up and make it hard to get back to sleep, which is less than ideal for your sleep quality. Another potential sleep challenge: Because people who have lucid dreams are aware that they are dreaming, many have some Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality?
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NSF_9_L_Sleepfoundation_DoesLucidDreamingAffectYourSleepQuality_Purchased_1440x600.jpg
azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 12:06
Good sleep quality is critical when it comes to health and wellness. But lucid dreams—extremely vivid reveries where the dreamer is aware that he or she is dreaming—can be stimulating, so it’s natural to wonder whether sleep quality is affected. Although most people don’t have them every night, lucid dreams are fairly common: About 55 percent of people say they’ve had at least one. Learn more about this unusual nighttime phenomenon and how it may impact your sleep quality. What’s Behind Lucid Dreams Although the exact cause of this type of dream is still to be determined, certain factors make them more likely. For instance, if you have narcolepsy —a condition that causes people to suddenly and quickly fall into a deep sleep—you might be more likely to experience lucid dreaming. This is because narcoleptics tend to drop into REM sleep right away, and it’s during this sleep stage that lucid dreams occur. How Sleep Quality Is Affected An all-too-real dream can also wake you up and make it hard to get back to sleep, which is less than ideal for your sleep quality. Another potential sleep challenge: Because people who have lucid dreams are aware that they are dreaming, many have some
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azra Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/do-lucid-dreams-affect-sleep-quality Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality? 2019-07-09T14:06:50.000-05:00 Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality? Image azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 12:06 Good sleep quality is critical when it comes to health and wellness. But lucid dreams—extremely vivid reveries where the dreamer is aware that he or she is dreaming—can be stimulating, so it’s natural to wonder whether sleep quality is affected. Although most people don’t have them every night, lucid dreams are fairly common: About 55 percent of people say they’ve had at least one. Learn more about this unusual nighttime phenomenon and how it may impact your sleep quality. What’s Behind Lucid Dreams Although the exact cause of this type of dream is still to be determined, certain factors make them more likely. For instance, if you have narcolepsy —a condition that causes people to suddenly and quickly fall into a deep sleep—you might be more likely to experience lucid dreaming. This is because narcoleptics tend to drop into REM sleep right away, and it’s during this sleep stage that lucid dreams occur. How Sleep Quality Is Affected An all-too-real dream can also wake you up and make it hard to get back to sleep, which is less than ideal for your sleep quality. Another potential sleep challenge: Because people who have lucid dreams are aware that they are dreaming, many have some Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality?
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NSF_9_L_Sleepfoundation_DoesLucidDreamingAffectYourSleepQuality_Purchased_1440x600.jpg
azra
Tue, 07/09/2019 - 12:06
Good sleep quality is critical when it comes to health and wellness. But lucid dreams—extremely vivid reveries where the dreamer is aware that he or she is dreaming—can be stimulating, so it’s natural to wonder whether sleep quality is affected. Although most people don’t have them every night, lucid dreams are fairly common: About 55 percent of people say they’ve had at least one. Learn more about this unusual nighttime phenomenon and how it may impact your sleep quality. What’s Behind Lucid Dreams Although the exact cause of this type of dream is still to be determined, certain factors make them more likely. For instance, if you have narcolepsy —a condition that causes people to suddenly and quickly fall into a deep sleep—you might be more likely to experience lucid dreaming. This is because narcoleptics tend to drop into REM sleep right away, and it’s during this sleep stage that lucid dreams occur. How Sleep Quality Is Affected An all-too-real dream can also wake you up and make it hard to get back to sleep, which is less than ideal for your sleep quality. Another potential sleep challenge: Because people who have lucid dreams are aware that they are dreaming, many have some
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azra NSF Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/what-you-should-know-about-sleep-paralysis What You Should Know About Sleep Paralysis 2019-07-09T13:59:19.000-05:00 What You Should Know About Sleep Paralysis Image azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:59 You may have had the experience of feeling like you can’t move during a dream, but if this has happened while you’re in the process of falling asleep or waking up, this experience has a name: sleep paralysis. During sleep paralysis , your mind is conscious but you are unable to move your body. You may also think you see or hear things that aren’t really there or experience the sensation of choking or someone sitting on your chest. It can be a frightening experience, but understanding what’s behind it can make it feel less stressful. Learn what causes this REM phenomenon and how you can lower the chances of it happening to you. What It Feels Like As you fall asleep, your body slowly relaxes itself and becomes less responsive to physical signals from your brain. During sleep paralysis, your body begins to go through the relaxation process but your mind is awake enough to notice that is no longer controlling your ability to move or speak. Sleep paralysis can also occur when you are in the process of waking up . In this case, your mind regains consciousness before your REM sleep cycle is finished. During REM sleep, your body is relaxed and your muscles are “turned off” off so that you What You Should Know About Sleep Paralysis
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azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:59
You may have had the experience of feeling like you can’t move during a dream, but if this has happened while you’re in the process of falling asleep or waking up, this experience has a name: sleep paralysis. During sleep paralysis , your mind is conscious but you are unable to move your body. You may also think you see or hear things that aren’t really there or experience the sensation of choking or someone sitting on your chest. It can be a frightening experience, but understanding what’s behind it can make it feel less stressful. Learn what causes this REM phenomenon and how you can lower the chances of it happening to you. What It Feels Like As you fall asleep, your body slowly relaxes itself and becomes less responsive to physical signals from your brain. During sleep paralysis, your body begins to go through the relaxation process but your mind is awake enough to notice that is no longer controlling your ability to move or speak. Sleep paralysis can also occur when you are in the process of waking up . In this case, your mind regains consciousness before your REM sleep cycle is finished. During REM sleep, your body is relaxed and your muscles are “turned off” off so that you
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azra NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/what-you-should-know-about-sleep-paralysis What You Should Know About Sleep Paralysis 2019-07-09T13:59:19.000-05:00 What You Should Know About Sleep Paralysis Image azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:59 You may have had the experience of feeling like you can’t move during a dream, but if this has happened while you’re in the process of falling asleep or waking up, this experience has a name: sleep paralysis. During sleep paralysis , your mind is conscious but you are unable to move your body. You may also think you see or hear things that aren’t really there or experience the sensation of choking or someone sitting on your chest. It can be a frightening experience, but understanding what’s behind it can make it feel less stressful. Learn what causes this REM phenomenon and how you can lower the chances of it happening to you. What It Feels Like As you fall asleep, your body slowly relaxes itself and becomes less responsive to physical signals from your brain. During sleep paralysis, your body begins to go through the relaxation process but your mind is awake enough to notice that is no longer controlling your ability to move or speak. Sleep paralysis can also occur when you are in the process of waking up . In this case, your mind regains consciousness before your REM sleep cycle is finished. During REM sleep, your body is relaxed and your muscles are “turned off” off so that you What You Should Know About Sleep Paralysis
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NSF_9_J_Sleepfoundation_SleepParalysis_WhatCausesThisREMPhenomenon_Purchased_1440x600.jpg
azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:59
You may have had the experience of feeling like you can’t move during a dream, but if this has happened while you’re in the process of falling asleep or waking up, this experience has a name: sleep paralysis. During sleep paralysis , your mind is conscious but you are unable to move your body. You may also think you see or hear things that aren’t really there or experience the sensation of choking or someone sitting on your chest. It can be a frightening experience, but understanding what’s behind it can make it feel less stressful. Learn what causes this REM phenomenon and how you can lower the chances of it happening to you. What It Feels Like As you fall asleep, your body slowly relaxes itself and becomes less responsive to physical signals from your brain. During sleep paralysis, your body begins to go through the relaxation process but your mind is awake enough to notice that is no longer controlling your ability to move or speak. Sleep paralysis can also occur when you are in the process of waking up . In this case, your mind regains consciousness before your REM sleep cycle is finished. During REM sleep, your body is relaxed and your muscles are “turned off” off so that you
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azra Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/what-you-should-know-about-sleep-paralysis What You Should Know About Sleep Paralysis 2019-07-09T13:59:19.000-05:00 What You Should Know About Sleep Paralysis Image azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:59 You may have had the experience of feeling like you can’t move during a dream, but if this has happened while you’re in the process of falling asleep or waking up, this experience has a name: sleep paralysis. During sleep paralysis , your mind is conscious but you are unable to move your body. You may also think you see or hear things that aren’t really there or experience the sensation of choking or someone sitting on your chest. It can be a frightening experience, but understanding what’s behind it can make it feel less stressful. Learn what causes this REM phenomenon and how you can lower the chances of it happening to you. What It Feels Like As you fall asleep, your body slowly relaxes itself and becomes less responsive to physical signals from your brain. During sleep paralysis, your body begins to go through the relaxation process but your mind is awake enough to notice that is no longer controlling your ability to move or speak. Sleep paralysis can also occur when you are in the process of waking up . In this case, your mind regains consciousness before your REM sleep cycle is finished. During REM sleep, your body is relaxed and your muscles are “turned off” off so that you What You Should Know About Sleep Paralysis
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NSF_9_J_Sleepfoundation_SleepParalysis_WhatCausesThisREMPhenomenon_Purchased_1440x600.jpg
azra
Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:59
You may have had the experience of feeling like you can’t move during a dream, but if this has happened while you’re in the process of falling asleep or waking up, this experience has a name: sleep paralysis. During sleep paralysis , your mind is conscious but you are unable to move your body. You may also think you see or hear things that aren’t really there or experience the sensation of choking or someone sitting on your chest. It can be a frightening experience, but understanding what’s behind it can make it feel less stressful. Learn what causes this REM phenomenon and how you can lower the chances of it happening to you. What It Feels Like As you fall asleep, your body slowly relaxes itself and becomes less responsive to physical signals from your brain. During sleep paralysis, your body begins to go through the relaxation process but your mind is awake enough to notice that is no longer controlling your ability to move or speak. Sleep paralysis can also occur when you are in the process of waking up . In this case, your mind regains consciousness before your REM sleep cycle is finished. During REM sleep, your body is relaxed and your muscles are “turned off” off so that you
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azra NSF Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/what-lucid-dreaming What Is Lucid Dreaming? 2019-07-09T13:49:08.000-05:00 What Is Lucid Dreaming? Image azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:49 Having an occasional strange dream isn’t unusual—but sometimes they can border on a nightmare, resulting in stress and lost sleep. If that sounds familiar, you’re not alone: More than 50 percent of adults have nightmares or intense visions at night. The latter are known as lucid dreams, and can be so vivid that you wake up certain they really happened. They go beyond run-of-the mill stressful dreams (like the ones where you’re running late for an important meeting and all the doors are locked, or you show up at a party only to realize you’re not wearing any clothes). Lucid dreams can feel incredibly real and may leave you shaken as a result. Understand more about this kind of dream and learn tips for better sleep—fast. Related Health Connection Lucid dreaming may be associated with narcolepsy, a clinical sleep disorder that causes people to fall asleep quickly at any point during the day. Many people with this condition report having extremely vivid, strange dreams that feel true to real life. Why REM Matters The reason behind vivid night dreams in those with narcolepsy may be related to the stage of sleep called REM, or rapid-eye movement. A person with narcolepsy often enters What Is Lucid Dreaming?
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azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:49
Having an occasional strange dream isn’t unusual—but sometimes they can border on a nightmare, resulting in stress and lost sleep. If that sounds familiar, you’re not alone: More than 50 percent of adults have nightmares or intense visions at night. The latter are known as lucid dreams, and can be so vivid that you wake up certain they really happened. They go beyond run-of-the mill stressful dreams (like the ones where you’re running late for an important meeting and all the doors are locked, or you show up at a party only to realize you’re not wearing any clothes). Lucid dreams can feel incredibly real and may leave you shaken as a result. Understand more about this kind of dream and learn tips for better sleep—fast. Related Health Connection Lucid dreaming may be associated with narcolepsy, a clinical sleep disorder that causes people to fall asleep quickly at any point during the day. Many people with this condition report having extremely vivid, strange dreams that feel true to real life. Why REM Matters The reason behind vivid night dreams in those with narcolepsy may be related to the stage of sleep called REM, or rapid-eye movement. A person with narcolepsy often enters
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azra NSF Alert
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/what-lucid-dreaming What Is Lucid Dreaming? 2019-07-09T13:49:08.000-05:00 What Is Lucid Dreaming? Image azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:49 Having an occasional strange dream isn’t unusual—but sometimes they can border on a nightmare, resulting in stress and lost sleep. If that sounds familiar, you’re not alone: More than 50 percent of adults have nightmares or intense visions at night. The latter are known as lucid dreams, and can be so vivid that you wake up certain they really happened. They go beyond run-of-the mill stressful dreams (like the ones where you’re running late for an important meeting and all the doors are locked, or you show up at a party only to realize you’re not wearing any clothes). Lucid dreams can feel incredibly real and may leave you shaken as a result. Understand more about this kind of dream and learn tips for better sleep—fast. Related Health Connection Lucid dreaming may be associated with narcolepsy, a clinical sleep disorder that causes people to fall asleep quickly at any point during the day. Many people with this condition report having extremely vivid, strange dreams that feel true to real life. Why REM Matters The reason behind vivid night dreams in those with narcolepsy may be related to the stage of sleep called REM, or rapid-eye movement. A person with narcolepsy often enters What Is Lucid Dreaming?
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NSF_9_H_Sleepfoundation_WhatIsLucidDreaming_Purchased_1440x600.jpg
azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:49
Having an occasional strange dream isn’t unusual—but sometimes they can border on a nightmare, resulting in stress and lost sleep. If that sounds familiar, you’re not alone: More than 50 percent of adults have nightmares or intense visions at night. The latter are known as lucid dreams, and can be so vivid that you wake up certain they really happened. They go beyond run-of-the mill stressful dreams (like the ones where you’re running late for an important meeting and all the doors are locked, or you show up at a party only to realize you’re not wearing any clothes). Lucid dreams can feel incredibly real and may leave you shaken as a result. Understand more about this kind of dream and learn tips for better sleep—fast. Related Health Connection Lucid dreaming may be associated with narcolepsy, a clinical sleep disorder that causes people to fall asleep quickly at any point during the day. Many people with this condition report having extremely vivid, strange dreams that feel true to real life. Why REM Matters The reason behind vivid night dreams in those with narcolepsy may be related to the stage of sleep called REM, or rapid-eye movement. A person with narcolepsy often enters
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azra Sleep Foundation Sleep News
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/what-lucid-dreaming What Is Lucid Dreaming? 2019-07-09T13:49:08.000-05:00 What Is Lucid Dreaming? Image azra Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:49 Having an occasional strange dream isn’t unusual—but sometimes they can border on a nightmare, resulting in stress and lost sleep. If that sounds familiar, you’re not alone: More than 50 percent of adults have nightmares or intense visions at night. The latter are known as lucid dreams, and can be so vivid that you wake up certain they really happened. They go beyond run-of-the mill stressful dreams (like the ones where you’re running late for an important meeting and all the doors are locked, or you show up at a party only to realize you’re not wearing any clothes). Lucid dreams can feel incredibly real and may leave you shaken as a result. Understand more about this kind of dream and learn tips for better sleep—fast. Related Health Connection Lucid dreaming may be associated with narcolepsy, a clinical sleep disorder that causes people to fall asleep quickly at any point during the day. Many people with this condition report having extremely vivid, strange dreams that feel true to real life. Why REM Matters The reason behind vivid night dreams in those with narcolepsy may be related to the stage of sleep called REM, or rapid-eye movement. A person with narcolepsy often enters What Is Lucid Dreaming?
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NSF_9_H_Sleepfoundation_WhatIsLucidDreaming_Purchased_1440x600.jpg
azra
Tue, 07/09/2019 - 11:49
Having an occasional strange dream isn’t unusual—but sometimes they can border on a nightmare, resulting in stress and lost sleep. If that sounds familiar, you’re not alone: More than 50 percent of adults have nightmares or intense visions at night. The latter are known as lucid dreams, and can be so vivid that you wake up certain they really happened. They go beyond run-of-the mill stressful dreams (like the ones where you’re running late for an important meeting and all the doors are locked, or you show up at a party only to realize you’re not wearing any clothes). Lucid dreams can feel incredibly real and may leave you shaken as a result. Understand more about this kind of dream and learn tips for better sleep—fast. Related Health Connection Lucid dreaming may be associated with narcolepsy, a clinical sleep disorder that causes people to fall asleep quickly at any point during the day. Many people with this condition report having extremely vivid, strange dreams that feel true to real life. Why REM Matters The reason behind vivid night dreams in those with narcolepsy may be related to the stage of sleep called REM, or rapid-eye movement. A person with narcolepsy often enters
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azra NSF Sleep News
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190701144513.htm CPAP provides relief from depression 2019-07-01T13:45:13.000-05:00 Researchers have found that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can improve depression symptoms in patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=127 Effect of Delaying School Start Time on Sleep Quality, Emotions, and Performance in Korean ... 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Background and Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of delaying school start time on sleep quality, emotions, and performance in Korean adolescents. Methods Data were collected in two months and 12 months after delaying school time, each using self-administered questionnaires for 238 students at a middle school in Gyeonggi province. Questionnaires consisted of demographic data and various sleep and emotion related scales, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Students were divided into two groups, of increased or decreased total sleep time (TST). Results In both groups, sleep duration, global PSQI score, and sleep efficiency significantly improved in 12 months, compared to two months’ data. There was significant improvement in depression, stress, behavioral aggression, and verbal aggression in the increased TST group. The increased TST group showed advancement in subjective feeling of happiness, and number of times students are late for school, between baseline and 12 months. The decreased TST group showed significant differences between baseline and 12 months in seven categories of subjective life quality/emotions in school, including subjective feeling of happiness, concentrating in classes, and anger. Conclusions After school start time was delayed, many adolescent’s TST relatively decreased on school nights. However, students whose TST increased, showed reduction in depression, stress, and behavioral/verbal aggression. Students whose TST decreased also reported reduced negative affect, and significant improvement in subjective emotions and school performance. Delaying school start time may be beneficial, in improving mental health and quality of life of students. Sleep Medicine Research http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=129 Modest Effects of Low-frequency Electrical Stimulation on Patients with Chronic Insomnia in an ... 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Background and Objective The purpose of this study, was to investigate the effects of low-frequency transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) on chronic insomnia. Treatment options in patients with chronic insomnia are limited to medications, and cognitive behavioral therapy. Methods Fifty-four chronic insomniacs received TENS with low-frequency, applied on trapeziums muscles for at least 30 minutes to 1 hour before sleeping, more than 5 days weekly, for 4 weeks. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and quantitative electroencephalography at waking state, were obtained pre and post treatment. Results Poor sleep quality and insomnia severity decreased significantly, and relative delta power in the occipital region, also decreased after TENS. Overall treatment response rate was 57.5%, and predictive factors of treatment response were daytime sleepiness, as well as depressive and anxious mood. Relative delta power in occipital region of responders significantly decreased over time, while that of non-responders did not change This seemed to be associated with insomnia symptom improvement, and resulting daytime alertness. Conclusions Low-frequency electrical stimulation, was modestly effective in chronic insomnia patients. Our results provide an alternative option of insomnia treatment, for future study.

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Sleep Medicine Research
http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=128 Difference in Psychological Distress between Patients with Periodic Limb Movement Disorder and ... 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Background and Objective We used the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) to compare the psychosomatic symptom profiles between periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients. Methods Twenty consecutive drug-naïve RLS patients, 20 age- and sex-matched patients with PLMD and healthy controls were enrolled. Questionnaires evaluating sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Insomnia Severity Index), depression (Beck Depression Inventory II), and psychosomatic symptoms (SCL-90-R) were administered. Polysomnography was performed in the patients with PLMD or RLS. Results The mean age of the subjects was 57.5 ± 10.9 years, and half of the subjects were male. Compared with the patients with RLS, the patients with PLMD exhibited a reduced total sleep time (276.6 ± 41.3 vs. 322.4 ± 42.9, p = 0.04) and a decreased proportion of REM sleep (12.5 ± 6.6 vs. 17.8 ± 7.8, p = 0.009). The patients with RLS exhibited higher SCL-90-R T-scores on the somatization (post hoc p Sleep Medicine Research http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=132 Cancer-Related Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep May Influence Insomnia of Cancer Patients ... 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Background and Objective Depression is one of the major causes of insomnia among cancer patients, and should be explored among cancer patients who are suffering from insomnia. The objective of this study was to explore whether dysfunctional beliefs about sleep among cancer patients were associated with insomnia independent of depression. Methods Medical records of patients who visited Asan Medical Center sleep clinic for cancer were reviewed retrospectively from January to November of 2017. The data included the patient’s psychiatric symptoms and assessment of sleep disorders Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Patient’s Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Fear of Progression (FoP), and Cancer-related Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep (C-DBS) and a clinical interview. Results Results indicated that ISI score was significantly correlated with PHQ-9, FoP, and CDBS scores, and C-DBS score was significantly correlated with ISI, PHQ-9, and FoP scores all, p Sleep Medicine Research http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=136 Clinical and Polysomnographic Characteristics of Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Background and Objective Although restless legs syndrome (RLS) symptoms are relatively clear, many people are suffering from RLS without proper care because RLS is often underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Purpose of this study was to examine clinical and polysomnographic aspects of RLS to better understand the disorder for future diagnosis. Methods This study enrolled 113 idiopathic untreated RLS patients, including 74 (65.5%) women and 39 (34.5%) men. Restless legs syndrome rating scale (RLSRS) and RLS checklist were examined. All patients underwent suggested immobilization test (SIT) and polysomnogram (PSG). Results RLS occurred in all age groups. It was the most prevalent in age groups of 50s and 60s. On average, RLS was diagnosed 12.5 years after the first occurrence of RLS symptoms. RLS occurred twice as often among women than that among men. Based on average RLSRS, 57.5% and 26.5% of patients belonged to severe and very severe categories, respectively. While symptoms were the most prominent between 8 PM and 4 AM, patients reported that calves were the main site of discomfort. Of all participants, 54.9% reported family history of RLS. RLS patients’ PSGs showed lower sleep efficiency (SE), total sleep time, and slow wave percentage with higher leg movement arousal index (LMAI), arousal index, and sleep latency (SL). RLSRS was positively correlated with LMAI (r = 0.221, p Sleep Medicine Research http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=134 The Influence of Sleep Disturbance and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies on Depressive ... 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Background and Objective Depression and insomnia are highly prevalent and important distressing symptoms in breast cancer patients. And also, strategies to assist with cognitive emotions are important to help them cope with the stress of the disease. This study aimed to investigate the effects of sleep disturbance and these coping strategies on depressive symptoms in breast cancer patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 119 breast cancer patients. Psychiatric assessments were done using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), state subcategory of State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S), Cancer-related Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep (C-DBS), Fear of Progression (FoP), and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ). Results Significant differences in the ISI, C-DBS, FoP, and in the regulation strategies of CERQ, were observed between depressed (PHQ-9 ≥ 10, n = 60) and non-depressed patient groups (PHQ-9 Sleep Medicine Research http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=133 Four Weeks Exercise in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus ... 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise in patient with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and without continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) treatment, in polysomnography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) parameters. 41 years old man with T2DM underwent full overnight polysomnography (PSG) and 48 hours after PSG performed maximal CPET. Patient re-checked after 24 and 28 weeks. After the 24 weeks follow-up the patient underwent 4 weeks aerobic exercise. The results showed changes between baseline and after 4 week exercise in parameters of polysomnography study, blood test and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. The findings of our study suggest that exercise can reduced the apnea-hypopnea index, improve the sleep quality and reduced the hemoglobin A1-c levels in patients with OSAS and without CPAP treatment. Sleep Medicine Research http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=135 The Relationship between Depression and Insomnia Symptoms Amongst a Sample of UK University Students 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Research exploring the relationship between mental health difficulties and insomnia amongst students in the UK remains limited. This study further examined the extent of potential relationships between insomnia, anxiety and depression symptoms amongst university students in the UK. A sample of 487 students from four northern universities completed The Insomnia Severity Index, SLEEP-50, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales. Approximately one fifth of students experienced mild to severe levels of depressive symptoms, and two thirds reported anxious symptoms. One quarter of students indicated insomnia symptoms in the clinical range, however the prevalence of sleep-disorders other than insomnia remained low ( Sleep Medicine Research http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=130 Predictors for Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in Thai Population 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Background and Objective Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome (OHS), is a condition with high morbidity and mortality. Body Mass Index (BMI) of more than 30 kg/m2 is used, to diagnose OHS. As BMI for obesity for Thais is 25 kg/m2, BMI more than 25 kg/m2 is used in our institution, to diagnose OHS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if BMI of 25 kg/m2 is appropriate criterion for OHS in Thai patients. Methods This study was a retrospective study conducted at Khon Kaen University. Inclusion criteria were adult patients diagnosed with OHS in 2016. Patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), were randomly selected as control subjects. The ratio of OHS:OSA, was 1:4. Clinical factors associated with OHS were examined, using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results During the study period, there were 25 OHS and 108 OSA patients. The OHS group had a significantly higher average BMI (48.9 kg/m2 vs. 29.2 kg/m2), than the OSA group. The OHS group also had higher proportions of patients with pulmonary hypertension (50% vs. 2%), and heart failure (76% vs. 6.5%). There were two independent predictors for OHS, including BMI and serum bicarbonate levels. Adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for each of these factors was 1.08 (1.01, 1.17) and 1.96 (1.15, 3.34), respectively. Body mass index greater than 25 kg/m2 and serum bicarbonate more than 25 mEq/L, yielded 100% sensitivity for OHS. Conclusions Appropriate diagnostic criteria for OHS for the Thai population, may be different from those for populations in Western countries. 2 is used, to diagnose OHS. As BMI for obesity for Thais is 25 kg/m2, BMI more than 25 kg/m2 is used in our institution, to diagnose OHS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if BMI of 25 kg/m2 is appropriate criterion for OHS in Thai patients. Methods This study was a retrospective study conducted at Khon Kaen University. Inclusion criteria were adult patients diagnosed with OHS in 2016. Patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), were randomly selected as control subjects. The ratio of OHS:OSA, was 1:4. Clinical factors associated with OHS were examined, using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results During the study period, there were 25 OHS and 108 OSA patients. The OHS group had a significantly higher average BMI (48.9 kg/m2 vs. 29.2 kg/m2), than the OSA group. The OHS group also had higher proportions of patients with pulmonary hypertension (50% vs. 2%), and heart failure (76% vs. 6.5%). There were two independent predictors for OHS, including BMI and serum bicarbonate levels. Adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for each of these factors was 1.08 (1.01, 1.17) and 1.96 (1.15, 3.34), respectively. Body mass index greater than 25 kg/m2 and serum bicarbonate more than 25 mEq/L, yielded 100% sensitivity for OHS. Conclusions Appropriate diagnostic criteria for OHS for the Thai population, may be different from those for populations in Western countries.

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Sleep Medicine Research
http://www.sleepmedres.org/journal/view.php?number=131 Correlation between Tonsil Shadow Area on Skull Lateral View and Tonsil Volume after Tonsillectomy 2019-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Background and Objective To begin with, an adenotonsillectomy is one of the most common operations in children who have been diagnosed with a condition of sleep-disordered breathing. Upon the preoperative evaluation of tonsil and adenoid size, it is important to predict the probable postoperative outcome. In this study, we investigated the correlation between the subjective tonsil grade, tonsil shadow area on skull lateral view radiographs, and tonsil volume after tonsillectomy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 234 patients who underwent an adenotonsillectomy in the tertiary referral hospital from January to June 2014. We demarcated the tonsil shadow area on the skull lateral view. When visible, the tonsil shadow area was considered as ellipse. The tonsil area was calculated by measuring the major (2a) and minor (2b) axes of shadow (S=πab). The tonsil volume was measured at the time of surgery. Results The tonsil shadow was visible in 180 cases and invisible in 54 cases. The tonsil volume varied from 1.0 cm3 to 9.5 cm3. It is noted that the tonsil volume was significantly greater in the visible group than in the invisible group, based on the lateral radiograph (3.81 ± 1.21 cm3, 3.24 ± 1.03 cm3, respectively; p = 0.002). In a review of the visible tonsil group (n = 180), there was a positive correlation between the tonsil shadow area and tonsil volume (r = 0.489, p 3 to 9.5 cm3. It is noted that the tonsil volume was significantly greater in the visible group than in the invisible group, based on the lateral radiograph (3.81 ± 1.21 cm3, 3.24 ± 1.03 cm3, respectively; p = 0.002). In a review of the visible tonsil group (n = 180), there was a positive correlation between the tonsil shadow area and tonsil volume (r = 0.489, p ]]> Sleep Medicine Research https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190607193709.htm Study links sleep-disordered breathing to age acceleration 2019-06-07T18:37:09.000-05:00 Increasing severity of sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption are associated with epigenetic age acceleration, according to preliminary results of a new study. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea https://myapnea.org/blog/clinical-trial-of-drug-treatment-in-obstructive-sleep-apnea-osa Clinical Trial Of Drug Treatment in Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) 2019-05-30T23:00:00.000-05:00 join a research study to test drugs for sleep apnea For the last decades, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been treated with positive airways pressure devices, usually CPAP. But as many patients will attest, CPAP is often uncomfortable and can make it difficult to sleep both for the patient and bedpartner. A number of researchers, including Andrew Wellman and his colleagues at Brigham and Women’s, have sought to go beyond CPAP by developing drug treatments for OSA. A number of drugs have been tried, with no success, until recently, Andrew and his colleague Luigi Taranto, tried a combination of atomoxetine (Strattera) and oxybutynin (Ditropan). The results were surprising and dramatic; almost all the patients improved significantly. These results led to the formation of Apnimed, Inc., a company created to test the results of atomoxetine and oxybutynin in a larger number of patients.

The “Phase 2” trial of these drugs is now in progress at 12 centers across the U.S. Patients who are 25-65 years of age (up to 70 for women) and have been diagnosed with moderate to severe OSA may be eligible for treatment of 10 days. The sites where the trial is taking place are:

  • New York City, NY

  • Baltimore, MD/Washington, DC

  • Cincinnati, OH

  • Chicago, IL

  • Louisville, KY

  • Little Rock, AR

  • St. Louis, MO

  • San Antonio, TX

  • Phoenix, AZ

  • Stanford, CA

  • Los Angeles, CA

More information concerning the clinical trial can be found at ClinicalTrials.gov: clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03845023.

If you are interested in participating, please contact info@apnimed.com.

The MyApnea team wanted to share this exciting sleep apnea research opportunity with our readers. MyApnea is not affiliated with Apnimed.

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RebeccaR My Apnea
https://myapnea.org/blog/got-stress Got Stress? 2019-05-15T23:00:00.000-05:00 Enroll in a mindfulness study to reduce stress Most people experience stress at some point in their lives. Stress can make you feel bad. Stress can also make your health problems worse. This includes heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, depression, even cancer, and of course, sleep! The important role of stress in health is what inspired MyApnea to collaborate on a new research study about stress. MyApnea is working with similar patient groups around the country and together we represent more than 100 different medical conditions (including sleep apnea).

The new nationwide study is called Healthy Mind Healthy You. The goal is to learn more about how mindfulness can reduce stress. The study is 100% online. All members of MyApnea can join including sleep apnea patients, caregivers, and family members.

What is mindfulness?

Mindfulness focuses on being in the present moment. At the same time, you observe your thoughts and feelings in an accepting, non-judgmental way. When you do mindfulness, you usually start by paying attention to your breathing and your body. Then you move to your thoughts and feelings.

Mindfulness comes from traditions that go back hundreds of years. This study is not related to any religion. If you participate in the study, you are randomly assigned to an online mindfulness programs: either a 3-session program or an 8-session program.

What happens if I join?

-Need internet access.

-Be at least 18 years old.

-Review information about the study and agree (consent) to join the study.

-Answer a few questions about yourself.

-Complete the 3-session or 8-session online mindfulness program.

-Fill out questionnaires during the study so we can see how you are doing.

SIGN ME UP!

If you have any questions, contact Rebecca: rrottapel@bwh.harvard.edu, 857-307-0343

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RebeccaR My Apnea
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleeptechr/news-events/cea-nsf-wearable-sleep-monitors-working-group CEA &amp; NSF Wearable Sleep Monitors Working Group 2019-05-01T15:29:02.000-05:00 Image SleepTech® Home CEA & NSF Wearable Sleep Monitors Working Group Overview Sleep technology has incredible potential to improve consumers’ sleep and their health, but in many cases current sleep trackers have not met consumer expectations. It is possible for wearables to produce useful sleep tracking metrics, but we need to standardize. That’s why CEA and the National Sleep Foundation have partnered to explore technology standards that will aid the development of consumer sleep technology. In 2014, CEA formed a Wearable Sleep Monitors Working Group that is developing standards, bulletins and other documents addressing wearable sleep monitoring equipment. Members In addition to sleep experts from NSF, the working group includes companies at the leading edge of digital health technology, including Fitbit, Misfit Wearables, Jawbone, Qualcomm Life and Hillcrest Laboratories, among many others. Working Group Progress The Group has now published the standards below:  Performance Criteria and Testing Protocols for Features in Sleep Tracking Consumer Technology Devices and Applications (2019) Methodology of Measurements for Features in Sleep Tracking Consumer Technology Devices and Applications (2017) Definitions and Characteristics for Wearable Sleep Monitors (2016)      Join the Working Group! Anyone, except for members of the press, is eligible to join a CEA standards committee. Participation is free of charge for CEA members; non-members pay an annual participation fee based on your company’s annual revenue. For more information on how to join the Wearable Sleep Monitors Working Group, please visit here. SleepTech® Network Landing Page
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CEA & NSF Wearable Sleep Monitors Working Group

Overview

Sleep technology has incredible potential to improve consumers’ sleep and their health, but in many cases current sleep trackers have not met consumer expectations. It is possible for wearables to produce useful sleep tracking metrics, but we need to standardize.

That’s why CEA and the National Sleep Foundation have partnered to explore technology standards that will aid the development of consumer sleep technology. In 2014, CEA formed a Wearable Sleep Monitors Working Group that is developing standards, bulletins and other documents addressing wearable sleep monitoring equipment.

Members

In addition to sleep experts from NSF, the working group includes companies at the leading edge of digital health technology, including Fitbit, Misfit Wearables, Jawbone, Qualcomm Life and Hillcrest Laboratories, among many others.

Working Group Progress

The Group has now published the standards below: 

Report image cover of Performance Criteria and Testing Protocols for Features in Sleep Tracking Consumer Technology Devices and Applications  Report image cover of Methodology of Measurements for Features in Sleep Tracking Consumer Technology Devices and Applications  Report cover image of Definitions and Characteristics for Wearable Sleep Monitors

Join the Working Group!

Anyone, except for members of the press, is eligible to join a CEA standards committee. Participation is free of charge for CEA members; non-members pay an annual participation fee based on your company’s annual revenue. For more information on how to join the Wearable Sleep Monitors Working Group, please visit here.

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Christine National Sleep Foundation
https://myapnea.org/blog/the-commercial-argument-for-patient-directed-research Why Patient-Directed Research Is Good For Business 2019-04-22T23:00:00.000-05:00 Why patient directed research is important and why it should be supported This post summarizes a recent article published in MIT, Sloan Management Review. Find the full article here

The last time we posted, we discussed the concept of patient-initiated research and the “N of 1” approach. Since then, we conducted surveys in 10 countries to learn about all types of consumer-driven product innovations, including those in the medical field. Next, we did more studies to learn about medical-product innovation development, in particular. The studies, including surveys and face-to-face discussions with groups of patient innovators, allowed us to deeply understand key issues. These issues include the strong desire of medical patient innovation groups to find ways to design and ethically conduct clinical trials to test their innovations.

Members of patient communities, like MyApnea, have a long-standing tradition of sharing useful information that may be of value to others. They do this in response to questions and share new hacks that they have found useful. There is now growing evidence that patient communities are beginning to document their hacks in an organized way. In doing so, they are converting anecdote into data. And, from data comes knowledge.

We have highlighted the activities of two such patient communities: OpenAPS and Crohnology. Members of both communities have agreed to share their common experiences with each other in a formalized way (N of 1) and have agreed to aggregate their experiences (Aggregated N of 1). The number of people participating in the collection of data is striking, in some cases, numbering in the thousands.

Importantly, the phenomenon of patient-initiated research does not exclude the collaborative research approach exemplified in the MyApnea community. Clinical researchers can get valuable insights into the issues that are important to patients and include them in their formal studies. Paraphrasing our concluding paragraph, “As the free patient innovation system expands and strengthens over time, we expect to see greater complementarity…..Patients, medical product and service providers, and government regulators all have vital roles to play in supporting the free patient innovation system and helping it develop in medically and socially valuable directions. The economic reality is that commercial producers and medical service providers will never be able to deliver everything patients need. Innovative patients can fill many of the gaps if they are properly supported. A richer set of medical innovation options will benefit patients, commercial, medical caregivers, producers and society at large.”

We hope that you enjoy reading the full article and welcome your feedback. For the complete article, CLICK HERE.

Authors: HealthHackingWithNof1 (Harold DeMonaco, Pedro Oliveira, Andrew Torrance, Christiana von Hippel, and Eric von Hippel)

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RebeccaR My Apnea
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190416081414.htm Common sleep myths compromise good sleep and health 2019-04-16T07:14:14.000-05:00 People often say they can get by on five or fewer hours of sleep, that snoring is harmless, and that having a drink helps you to fall asleep. These are, in fact, among the most widely held myths about sleeping that not only shape poor habits, but may also pose a significant public health threat. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea https://myapnea.org/blog/starting-out-a-guide-to-sleep-apnea Starting Out: A guide to sleep apnea 2019-03-11T23:00:00.000-05:00 A basic guide to sleep apnea If you are like most people, the diagnosis of sleep apnea was a surprise. All of a sudden you have words and phrases like 'hypopnea', 'titration', and 'polysomnogram' thrown at you. Maybe you are told about treatment options, maybe not. Maybe you were told about other health issues that can occur or be made worse with untreated sleep apnea. If you are like most people diagnosed with sleep apnea, your main thought might be “But I don’t WANT to wear one of those breathing masks!”

Face it, we aren’t usually very familiar with most of the issues that surround sleep apnea. We don’t really know what it is, what causes it, how it affects us and what to do about it. Finding a doctor who has the time to answer our questions isn’t easy, even if we know what questions to ask. Looking online for answers can work if we find a reliable website that has wording we can understand. Being sleep deprived can make that hard.

But the MyApnea.org team came across a guide to sleep apnea in the New York Times written by Anahad O’Connor. The guide contains both graphics and additional links that present good, basic sleep apnea information.

All journeys have to start somewhere and we all know the sleep apnea road is rough. This guide is a good place to start or a way to make the journey easier to understand. It may not have everything you need but it does give information you can use to start a discussion with your doctor about what you need to know and what decisions you need to make.

What do you think about the guide? Is there an online resource you have found most useful? Let us know in the comments below.

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/well/sleep-apnea-guide

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Ruby My Apnea
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190303211427.htm Sleep apnea may be linked to higher levels of Alzheimer's biomarker in brain 2019-03-03T20:14:27.000-06:00 People who are witnessed by a bed partner to have stopped breathing during sleep may have higher accumulations of an Alzheimer's disease biomarker called tau in an area of the brain that helps with memory, according to a preliminary study. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea https://www.nature.com/articles/s41588-019-0361-7 Biological and clinical insights from genetics of insomnia symptoms 2019-02-24T18:00:00.000-06:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190214093413.htm Study affirms self-reported sleep duration as a useful health measure in children 2019-02-14T08:34:13.000-06:00 While sleep questionnaires are commonly completed by children and their parents, there has been a lack of data comparing the validity of these self-reported sleep parameters. A new study indicates that these sleep characteristics are relatively accurate compared to one another, and they vary only slightly from objective sleep measures. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190212092558.htm Obstructive sleep apnea linked to inflammation, organ dysfunction 2019-02-12T08:25:58.000-06:00 Voyagers no longer embark in search of the storied Fountain of Youth, but the quest for longevity is still very much alive for researchers. Chronological age -- the passing of time one spends on this planet -- cannot be reversed, of course. However, biological age -- one's health relative to that of one's peers -- can be turned back. Healthy lifestyle habits contribute to "aging well," meaning one's biological age is younger than one's chronological age, researchers said. And sleep is a major factor in how well one ages. Science Daily - Obstructive Sleep Apnea https://www.nature.com/articles/s41582-019-0140-1 Decreased NREM sleep linked with tauopathy 2019-01-29T18:00:00.000-06:00 Nature.com - Sleep Disorders https://myapnea.org/blog/sometimes-it-s-the-little-things Sometimes it's the little things 2019-01-20T23:00:00.000-06:00 Stress comes in different ways We all know that sometimes life is hard. Things just don’t seem to go our way no matter how much we work at them. A post from a person on the forum got me thinking about this. Not that I haven’t thought about it before but I didn’t realize that others felt the same. Sometimes, it’s the little things.

First though, let’s talk about the big things. Just some examples from my personal story but I would bet you have lots of your own. I recently retired which is a very good thing but I wasn’t prepared for the huge change in my life. For the first time my husband and I were together 24/7. Talk about an eye-opener! Then just recently I lost the insurance that had been paid by the job where I retired. It has been a real struggle to find other insurance; it costs a lot and doesn’t cover much. More recently that same insurance company has decided that my local sleep doctor and CPAP supply company are no longer in network. I have to find new ones and the closest are over 1 ½ hours away. These are some of the big things that make my life difficult.

However, sometimes it’s the little things. A letter is returned because I forgot to put a stamp on it. That new recipe that called for spices I had to go out and buy is dumped in the trash. The order I was so anxious to get is delayed. The post I worked so hard on for the forum didn’t post. I can’t find the ink pen that I really like to write with. I can’t download a book I can’t wait to read.

It can be the little things that get to us, especially when we are sleep deprived. So, I can’t find my special ink pen; I have lots of others that also write. But I want THAT one! My husband just shakes his head as I frantically look through drawers. Little things that shouldn’t matter at all can take on larger than life importance or disappointment. They tend to build up to mountainous size because we just can’t cope with one more them.

Stress can cause health issues like high blood pressure, headache, anxiety, lack of focus and depression. Guess what? Lack of sleep can cause these same things. According to many health sites, lack of sleep and stress can both cause you to look older. Another thing for me to stress and lose sleep over.

Some people find ideas for easing stress on-line. Some find a good therapist. Some turn to meditation, some to medication. For me, finding someone to listen while I vent helps the most. I am so blessed to have a couple of friends that do just that. Or distract me with shopping!

Forums like the one on this website can do the same. A good, well-run forum can be a place to ask questions, find answers and talk to others who have some of the same issues. I made life-long friends on a discussion forum for Restless Leg Syndrome years ago and we are still there for each other. One thing to remember, the people on forums are just people. Some come on and make a real difference, others ask a question and leave. When we come to the forum, we are all looking for something. It is a place where we learn that we aren’t alone.

I would be very interested in learning how you cope with the big and little things in your life. Getting rid of some of the stress might help us sleep better. And THAT, my friends, might help me look younger!

The same moon shines over us all. Ruby

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Ruby My Apnea
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleeptechr/news-events/sleeptech-award SleepTech Award 2018-12-07T17:41:35.000-06:00 Image SleepTech® Home SleepTech Award Each year the National Sleep Foundation recognizes innovative sleep products by giving out the SleepTech Awards, the world's first innovation awards targeted specifically at sleep technology. This year, the winners were announced at NSF's Sleep Show, March 8-10, 2019 in Houston, TX. Check back for updates on the 2020 Award soon!  SleepTech Award Winner: The ReST Bed™SleepTech App Award Winner: Timeshifter - The Jet Lag App® Semi-finalists:  Beddr Sleep Tuner™ Biostrap’s Sleep Lab  BreatheSimple  ChiliPad™ Comfort Control™ Mattress  Dreamlight Pro Embr Wave  EyeJust GetSnooze  Inspire Therapy Nanit Plus  Nasalaid Night Owl® Oura Sleep by Headspace  Sleep Equ Sleep-A-Board SleepPhones® Effortless™ SleepScore App Smart Nora Somnox Sleep Robot SonicTonic Sound + Sleep SE  Tatch™ Sleep Patch The ReST Bed™ Timeshifter - The Jet Lag App® Tranquilo Mat URGONight Read the 2019 Award Press Release SleepTech® Network Landing Page
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SleepTech Award

Each year the National Sleep Foundation recognizes innovative sleep products by giving out the SleepTech Awards, the world's first innovation awards targeted specifically at sleep technology. This year, the winners were announced at NSF's Sleep Show, March 8-10, 2019 in Houston, TX. Check back for updates on the 2020 Award soon! 

SleepTech Award Winner: The ReST Bed™
SleepTech App Award Winner: Timeshifter - The Jet Lag App®

Semi-finalists: 
Beddr Sleep Tuner™
Biostrap’s Sleep Lab 
BreatheSimple 
ChiliPad™
Comfort Control™ Mattress 
Dreamlight Pro
Embr Wave 
EyeJust
GetSnooze 
Inspire Therapy
Nanit Plus 
Nasalaid
Night Owl®
Oura
Sleep by Headspace 
Sleep Equ
Sleep-A-Board
SleepPhones® Effortless™
SleepScore App
Smart Nora
Somnox Sleep Robot
SonicTonic
Sound + Sleep SE 
Tatch™ Sleep Patch
The ReST Bed™
Timeshifter - The Jet Lag App®
Tranquilo Mat
URGONight

Read the 2019 Award Press Release

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Christine National Sleep Foundation
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleeptechr/news-events/industry-updates Industry Updates 2018-12-07T17:38:31.000-06:00 Image SleepTech® Home Industry Updates Recent SleepTech News Weekly roundup of all things SleepTech® 9/3/19 Weekly roundup of all things SleepTech® 8/27/19 Weekly roundup of all things SleepTech® 8/20/19 Weekly roundup of all things SleepTech® 8/13/19 Want to stay up to date on all the latest news in sleep technology and digital health? Subscribe to NSF's SleepTech Weekly Newsfeed to get the top headlines delivered right to your inbox every Tuesday. Sign Up Now Interviews with Industry Insiders Ayo's Aleksandar DimitrovBlue Sleep’s Jordan Stern ReST’s Lloyd Sommers MetroNaps’ Christopher Lindholst Eight’s Matteo Franceshetti  SleepTech® Network Landing Page
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Industry Updates

Recent SleepTech News

Weekly roundup of all things SleepTech® 9/3/19

Weekly roundup of all things SleepTech® 8/27/19

Weekly roundup of all things SleepTech® 8/20/19

Weekly roundup of all things SleepTech® 8/13/19

Want to stay up to date on all the latest news in sleep technology and digital health? Subscribe to NSF's SleepTech Weekly Newsfeed to get the top headlines delivered right to your inbox every Tuesday. Sign Up Now

Interviews with Industry Insiders

Ayo's Aleksandar Dimitrov
Blue Sleep’s Jordan Stern 
ReST’s Lloyd Sommers 
MetroNaps’ Christopher Lindholst 
Eight’s Matteo Franceshetti 

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Christine National Sleep Foundation
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/restless-leg-syndrome/about-rls About RLS 2018-11-21T15:15:59.000-06:00 Image Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) Home About RLS How Many People Have Restless Legs Syndrome? Restless Legs Syndrome affects approximately 10% of adults in the U.S. Researchers believe that RLS is commonly unrecognized or misdiagnosed as insomnia or other neurological, muscular or orthopedic condition. RLS also affects about 2% of children, according to a study of more than 10,000 families in the U.S. and U.K. The study also found a strong genetic component to RLS; more than 70% of children with RLS had at least one parent with the condition. There is also evidence suggesting that children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a family history of RLS are at risk for more severe ADHD. RLS may also be confused with depression. According to the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation, approximately 40% of people with RLS complain of symptoms that would indicate depression if assessed without knowledge or consideration of a sleep disorder. What Causes Restless Legs Syndrome? The exact cause of RLS is unknown. Primary RLS is the most common type of RLS. It is also referred to as familial (because it is hereditary) or idiopathic (because the causes are unknown) RLS. Secondary RLS, on the other hand, is believed to be caused by a separate underlying medical condition or in association with the use of certain drugs. For example, some of these conditions include vein disease in the legs such as varicose veins, kidney failure, low levels of iron or anemia, pregnancy, and peripheral neuropathy (a problem with the nerves that carry information to and from the brain and spinal cord that produces pain, loss of sensation, and inability to control muscles). Stress, diet or other environmental factors can also play a role in developing secondary RLS. Several research teams have taken a closer look at what might cause primary RLS. In particular, recent studies at Johns Hopkins and Pennsylvania State Colleges have found evidence for brain iron deficiency as a cause for primary RLS. This was first demonstrated in cerebrospinal fluid studies and more recently by the first-ever autopsy analysis of the brains of people with RLS. The autopsy studies reported that cells from the portion of the brain called the substantia nigra showed a deficit in one of the proteins that regulates iron status. However, this evidence suggests that the iron insufficiency in the brain of RLS patients comes directly from a failure of normal iron regulation. In terms of finding a cure, this is good news. The results of this study show that there is no brain damage in people with RLS and that drugs that target the problem of iron uptake may be one way to approach future developments of a treatment. More than 80 percent of people with RLS also suffer from a condition known as periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD). Characteristics of PLMD include involuntary leg twitching or jerking movements during sleep that occur repeatedly throughout the night and result in disrupted sleep. In addition to poor quality and short sleep at night, research has shown that people with RLS generally experience a reduced quality of life in the absence of treatment. Restless Legs and Varicose Veins Many studies indicate that RLS symptoms may be caused by underlying varicose veins in the legs.  Varicose veins are caused by unhealthy valves within the veins. When these valves fail or leak, the blood falls backward through the poorly functioning valves causing the blood pool and appear enlarged, twisted or bulging.  Scientists first theorized a connection with RLS due to the similar side effects of varicose vein sufferers including pain, fatigue, itching, burning, cramping, restlessness and throbbing.  In one particular study, clinicians treated 113 RLS patient’s vein disease using non-surgical treatments, and 98% of patients reported relief from the RLS symptoms. Who Can Get Restless Legs Syndrome? RLS affects both men and women and can start at any age. It may be confused with growing pains or restlessness when experienced by children. In addition, the severity of the disorder appears to increase with age. Older patients experience symptoms more frequently and for longer periods of time. RLS runs in families and may have a genetic component. In a recent study, the first RLS gene was discovered and was shown to account for approximately 50% of RLS cases. However, the researchers who identified the RLS gene cautioned that having it does not guarantee RLS. Rather, there are likely to be medical, environmental or other factors involved in translating RLS genetic susceptibility into RLS symptoms. Another RLS study also found that a genetic variant may account for about half of RLS cases and revealed an association between RLS and a gene for limb development, suggesting the possibility that RLS has components of a developmental disorder. Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) Landing Page
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Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS)

  1. Home

About RLS

How Many People Have Restless Legs Syndrome?

Restless Legs Syndrome affects approximately 10% of adults in the U.S. Researchers believe that RLS is commonly unrecognized or misdiagnosed as insomnia or other neurological, muscular or orthopedic condition.

RLS also affects about 2% of children, according to a study of more than 10,000 families in the U.S. and U.K. The study also found a strong genetic component to RLS; more than 70% of children with RLS had at least one parent with the condition. There is also evidence suggesting that children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a family history of RLS are at risk for more severe ADHD.

RLS may also be confused with depression. According to the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation, approximately 40% of people with RLS complain of symptoms that would indicate depression if assessed without knowledge or consideration of a sleep disorder.

What Causes Restless Legs Syndrome?

The exact cause of RLS is unknown.

Primary RLS is the most common type of RLS. It is also referred to as familial (because it is hereditary) or idiopathic (because the causes are unknown) RLS.

Secondary RLS, on the other hand, is believed to be caused by a separate underlying medical condition or in association with the use of certain drugs. For example, some of these conditions include vein disease in the legs such as varicose veins, kidney failure, low levels of iron or anemia, pregnancy, and peripheral neuropathy (a problem with the nerves that carry information to and from the brain and spinal cord that produces pain, loss of sensation, and inability to control muscles). Stress, diet or other environmental factors can also play a role in developing secondary RLS.

Several research teams have taken a closer look at what might cause primary RLS. In particular, recent studies at Johns Hopkins and Pennsylvania State Colleges have found evidence for brain iron deficiency as a cause for primary RLS. This was first demonstrated in cerebrospinal fluid studies and more recently by the first-ever autopsy analysis of the brains of people with RLS. The autopsy studies reported that cells from the portion of the brain called the substantia nigra showed a deficit in one of the proteins that regulates iron status. However, this evidence suggests that the iron insufficiency in the brain of RLS patients comes directly from a failure of normal iron regulation. In terms of finding a cure, this is good news. The results of this study show that there is no brain damage in people with RLS and that drugs that target the problem of iron uptake may be one way to approach future developments of a treatment.

More than 80 percent of people with RLS also suffer from a condition known as periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD). Characteristics of PLMD include involuntary leg twitching or jerking movements during sleep that occur repeatedly throughout the night and result in disrupted sleep.

In addition to poor quality and short sleep at night, research has shown that people with RLS generally experience a reduced quality of life in the absence of treatment.

Restless Legs and Varicose Veins

Many studies indicate that RLS symptoms may be caused by underlying varicose veins in the legs.  Varicose veins are caused by unhealthy valves within the veins. When these valves fail or leak, the blood falls backward through the poorly functioning valves causing the blood pool and appear enlarged, twisted or bulging.  Scientists first theorized a connection with RLS due to the similar side effects of varicose vein sufferers including pain, fatigue, itching, burning, cramping, restlessness and throbbing.  In one particular study, clinicians treated 113 RLS patient’s vein disease using non-surgical treatments, and 98% of patients reported relief from the RLS symptoms.

Who Can Get Restless Legs Syndrome?

RLS affects both men and women and can start at any age. It may be confused with growing pains or restlessness when experienced by children. In addition, the severity of the disorder appears to increase with age. Older patients experience symptoms more frequently and for longer periods of time.

RLS runs in families and may have a genetic component. In a recent study, the first RLS gene was discovered and was shown to account for approximately 50% of RLS cases. However, the researchers who identified the RLS gene cautioned that having it does not guarantee RLS.

Rather, there are likely to be medical, environmental or other factors involved in translating RLS genetic susceptibility into RLS symptoms. Another RLS study also found that a genetic variant may account for about half of RLS cases and revealed an association between RLS and a gene for limb development, suggesting the possibility that RLS has components of a developmental disorder.

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Christine National Sleep Foundation
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/restless-leg-syndrome/restless-legs-syndrome-rls-treatment Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) Treatment 2018-11-21T15:09:55.000-06:00 Image Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) Home Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) Treatment Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a serious, but treatable condition. The key to living with RLS is managing the symptoms. Lifestyle changes, like limiting caffeine and alcohol, taking iron supplements or a hot bath, or initiating an exercise plan, and seeing a heath care professional to discuss treatment options can help. Everyone experiences RLS differently, so it is important to work with your health care professional to determine the best way for you to control your symptoms. A detailed list of some other lifestyle changes you and your health care professional may want to consider include: Checking to see if there is an underlying iron or vitamin deficiency and then possibly supplementing your diet with iron, vitamin B12 or folate. Looking at medications you may be taking which could make RLS symptoms worse. These may include drugs used to treat high blood pressure, heart conditions, nausea, colds, allergies, and depression. Looking at any herbal and over-the-counter medicines you may be taking to see if they could be worsening your RLS. Identifying habits and activities that worsen RLS symptoms. Looking at your diet to assure it is healthy and balanced. Eliminating or lessening your alcohol intake. Looking at various activities that may help you personally deal with RLS. These could include walking, stretching, taking a hot or cold bath, massage, acupressure, or relaxation techniques. Also keeping your mind engaged with activities like discussions, needlework or video games when you have to stay seated. Implementing a program of good sleep habits. Reducing or eliminating caffeine from your diet to aid in general sleep hygiene. Foot Wrap Treatment For RLS Using a specially designed foot wrap at night may help alleviate the symptoms of RLS. Before sleep, the wrap is placed on the foot and applies continuous pressure to targeted foot muscles. This device is thought to work by signaling the brain to relax the muscles of the leg and relieve the sensations of RLS. Initial research found that patients who used the foot wrap reported a significant reduction in symptoms and lost significantly less sleep when using the device. This is a non-pharmacological (drug-free) treatment, so it doesn’t cause the adverse side effects that can be associated with some of the RLS medications. Patients in the initial study noted mild side effects that were solved by loosening the straps. This RLS treatment is cleared by the FDA and available by prescription from your doctor. Vein Treatment for RLS 98% of patients affected by RLS in a recent study found symptom relief after treating varicose veins in their legs with non-surgical sclerotherapy*.  Many physicians believe that it is the underlying vein problems that are causing the Restless Leg Syndrome, and by treating this with an outpatient procedure, patients can get relief.  How it works: Varicose veins are caused by unhealthy valves within the veins. When these valves fail or leak, the blood falls backward through the poorly functioning valves causing the blood to pool and appear enlarged, twisted or bulging. Scientists first theorized a connection with RLS due to the similar side effects of varicose vein sufferers including pain, fatigue, itching, burning, cramping, restlessness and throbbing. The modern treatments for varicose veins (and the corresponding RLS symptoms) are highly effective, and don’t require surgery.  A specialist called a Phlebologist does a procedure called sclerotherapy, which has little to no pain, and usually takes an hour. The patient is able to walk afterwards and then resume normal activities. Drugs Approved to Treat RLS Horizant® (gabapentin enacarbil) was approved by the FDA in 2011 for the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary RLS. Mirapex® was approved by the FDA in 2006 for the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary RLS. Requip® (ropinirole hydrochloride), a drug commonly used to treat Parkinson disease, was given FDA approval at lower doses for the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary RLS in 2005. All three drugs may cause side effects, such as sedation, nausea and dizziness and may cause patients to fall asleep without any warning, even while doing normal daily activities such as driving. In addition to Horizant®, Requip®, and Mirapex®, there are several drugs approved for other conditions that have been shown to alleviate RLS symptoms. They are: Dopaminergic agonists -- reduce RLS symptoms Dopaminergic agents -- reduce RLS symptoms Benzodiazepines -- allow for a more restful sleep Opiates -- induce relaxation and diminish pain Side Effects of RLS Drugs Side effects of RLS drug therapy may include daytime sleepiness (dopaminergic agonists and benzodiazepines), hallucinations and nausea (dopaminergic agents) or constipation and dependency (opiates). Before taking any medication, discuss the possibility of side effects with your doctor. In 1996, Drs. Allen and Earley from Johns Hopkins University described a phenomenon called augmentation, in which RLS symptoms are more severe, spread to parts of the body other than the legs, and begin earlier in the evening as a result of taking dopaminergic agents to treat RLS symptoms. If augmentation occurs it can be managed with dose and medication adjustments. Home Treatment of RLS There are also a number of self-directed activities for managing the symptoms of RLS including walking, massaging the legs, stretching, hot or cold packs, vibration, and acupressure. Practicing relaxation techniques such as meditation or yoga have been known to alleviate symptoms. For many people, treating an underlying cause or effective pharmacological treatment of primary RLS and implementation of coping strategies provides relief from most symptoms. However, sometimes medications need to be changed over time or doses adjusted and regular consultation with a physician is recommended. Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) Landing Page
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Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS)

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Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) Treatment

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a serious, but treatable condition. The key to living with RLS is managing the symptoms. Lifestyle changes, like limiting caffeine and alcohol, taking iron supplements or a hot bath, or initiating an exercise plan, and seeing a heath care professional to discuss treatment options can help. Everyone experiences RLS differently, so it is important to work with your health care professional to determine the best way for you to control your symptoms. A detailed list of some other lifestyle changes you and your health care professional may want to consider include:

  • Checking to see if there is an underlying iron or vitamin deficiency and then possibly supplementing your diet with iron, vitamin B12 or folate.
  • Looking at medications you may be taking which could make RLS symptoms worse. These may include drugs used to treat high blood pressure, heart conditions, nausea, colds, allergies, and depression.
  • Looking at any herbal and over-the-counter medicines you may be taking to see if they could be worsening your RLS.
  • Identifying habits and activities that worsen RLS symptoms.
  • Looking at your diet to assure it is healthy and balanced.
  • Eliminating or lessening your alcohol intake.
  • Looking at various activities that may help you personally deal with RLS.
    • These could include walking, stretching, taking a hot or cold bath, massage, acupressure, or relaxation techniques.
    • Also keeping your mind engaged with activities like discussions, needlework or video games when you have to stay seated.
    • Implementing a program of good sleep habits.
    • Reducing or eliminating caffeine from your diet to aid in general sleep hygiene.

Foot Wrap Treatment For RLS

Using a specially designed foot wrap at night may help alleviate the symptoms of RLS. Before sleep, the wrap is placed on the foot and applies continuous pressure to targeted foot muscles. This device is thought to work by signaling the brain to relax the muscles of the leg and relieve the sensations of RLS.

Initial research found that patients who used the foot wrap reported a significant reduction in symptoms and lost significantly less sleep when using the device. This is a non-pharmacological (drug-free) treatment, so it doesn’t cause the adverse side effects that can be associated with some of the RLS medications. Patients in the initial study noted mild side effects that were solved by loosening the straps.

This RLS treatment is cleared by the FDA and available by prescription from your doctor.

Vein Treatment for RLS

98% of patients affected by RLS in a recent study found symptom relief after treating varicose veins in their legs with non-surgical sclerotherapy*.  Many physicians believe that it is the underlying vein problems that are causing the Restless Leg Syndrome, and by treating this with an outpatient procedure, patients can get relief. 

How it works: Varicose veins are caused by unhealthy valves within the veins. When these valves fail or leak, the blood falls backward through the poorly functioning valves causing the blood to pool and appear enlarged, twisted or bulging. Scientists first theorized a connection with RLS due to the similar side effects of varicose vein sufferers including pain, fatigue, itching, burning, cramping, restlessness and throbbing.

The modern treatments for varicose veins (and the corresponding RLS symptoms) are highly effective, and don’t require surgery.  A specialist called a Phlebologist does a procedure called sclerotherapy, which has little to no pain, and usually takes an hour. The patient is able to walk afterwards and then resume normal activities.

Drugs Approved to Treat RLS

  • Horizant® (gabapentin enacarbil) was approved by the FDA in 2011 for the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary RLS.
  • Mirapex® was approved by the FDA in 2006 for the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary RLS.
  • Requip® (ropinirole hydrochloride), a drug commonly used to treat Parkinson disease, was given FDA approval at lower doses for the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary RLS in 2005.

All three drugs may cause side effects, such as sedation, nausea and dizziness and may cause patients to fall asleep without any warning, even while doing normal daily activities such as driving.

In addition to Horizant®, Requip®, and Mirapex®, there are several drugs approved for other conditions that have been shown to alleviate RLS symptoms. They are:

  • Dopaminergic agonists -- reduce RLS symptoms
  • Dopaminergic agents -- reduce RLS symptoms
  • Benzodiazepines -- allow for a more restful sleep
  • Opiates -- induce relaxation and diminish pain

Side Effects of RLS Drugs

Side effects of RLS drug therapy may include daytime sleepiness (dopaminergic agonists and benzodiazepines), hallucinations and nausea (dopaminergic agents) or constipation and dependency (opiates). Before taking any medication, discuss the possibility of side effects with your doctor.

In 1996, Drs. Allen and Earley from Johns Hopkins University described a phenomenon called augmentation, in which RLS symptoms are more severe, spread to parts of the body other than the legs, and begin earlier in the evening as a result of taking dopaminergic agents to treat RLS symptoms. If augmentation occurs it can be managed with dose and medication adjustments.

Home Treatment of RLS

There are also a number of self-directed activities for managing the symptoms of RLS including walking, massaging the legs, stretching, hot or cold packs, vibration, and acupressure. Practicing relaxation techniques such as meditation or yoga have been known to alleviate symptoms. For many people, treating an underlying cause or effective pharmacological treatment of primary RLS and implementation of coping strategies provides relief from most symptoms. However, sometimes medications need to be changed over time or doses adjusted and regular consultation with a physician is recommended.

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Christine National Sleep Foundation
https://myapnea.org/blog/no-more-counting-sheep-proven-behaviors-to-help-you-sleep No more counting sheep: Proven behaviors to help you sleep 2018-11-20T23:00:00.000-06:00 Millions of people have trouble sleeping, or don’t get enough quality sleep. Changes to your daytime habits and pre-bedtime behavior can consistently help you get better sleep. Excerpt of an article written by Dr. Suzanne Bertisch and originally published by the Harvard Health Blog.

As humans, we spend about one-third of our lives asleep. Though science has taught us about the human brain’s exquisite control of our daily sleep and wake patterns, tens of millions of Americans still don’t get the sleep they need. Nearly 20% of American adults report using a sleep medication to help them sleep, despite known side effects and information about how well they really work. Some people turn to alcohol for relief. And many have tried everything without relief.

Whether your problem is experiencing lack of quality sleep, feeling sleepy during the day, or not being able to get the seven to nine hours of sleep each night that most people need, first ask yourself, “What habits can I change to improve my sleep?”

Do you have good sleep hygiene? In general, sleep hygiene refers to practicing behaviors that promote sleep and stopping behaviors that are bad for sleep:

Nighttime tips to help with sleep

  • Maintain a regular sleep schedule
  • Go to bed when you are sleepy
  • Avoid electronics before bedtime
  • Create a comfortable sleep environment
  • Use your bed for sleep and sex only

Daytime tips to help with sleep

  • Avoid and limit caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine
  • Eat well and exercise
  • Treat health problems that interfere with sleep

To get more details on each sleep tip, read the full article! Also, find out what to do if you still can't sleep after trying these tips!

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RebeccaR My Apnea
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323681.php Gabapentin: What to know 2018-11-14T05:00:00.000-06:00 Doctors prescribe gabapentin to treat epilepsy, restless legs syndrome, and some types of nerve pain. Learn more about the uses and potential side effects here. Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleeptechr/contact Contact 2018-10-31T17:58:26.000-05:00 Image SleepTech® Home Contact    SleepTech® Network Landing Page
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Christine National Sleep Foundation
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleeptechr/news-events News &amp; Events 2018-10-31T17:11:01.000-05:00 Image SleepTech® Home News & Events March 21, 2019  ReST® (Responsive Surface Technology) Performance and Timeshifter® Win National Sleep Foundation SleepTech® Awards The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) announces the winners of the 2019 SleepTech Awards. These awards recognize innovative sleep technology companies. Twenty-eight semi-finalists pitched their product to a panel of judges in front of a live audience at Sleep Show® in Houston, Texas on March 9th.  Five finalists were selected from this group.  The ReST Bed™, which senses a sleeper's position and makes automatic real-time adjustments, won the 2019 SleepTech Award. Timeshifter - The Jet Lag App® based on sleep and circadian neuroscience research won the 2019 SleepTech App Award. Congratulations to ReST, Timeshifter, and all of the semi-finalists! NSF can’t wait to showcase more exciting innovations next year. To learn more or receive application updates, please contact jwurzer@sleepfoundation.org.    Feb 14, 2018 | And the Winner Is... In 2017, the National Sleep Foundation launched the world’s first innovation award for sleep technology. With so many companies developing exciting new technologies, NSF believes it is time to formally recognize these innovations.  The 18 unique semi-finalists pitched their products to an expert panel of judges at the third annual SleepTech® Summit co-located with the 2017 Health 2.0 Fall Conference. Happiest Baby’s SNOO Smart Sleeper was named the winner! SNOO features adjustable and automated rocking motions, white noise generation, and a variety of safety and comfort features with the aim of helping babies sleep longer and better The award was presented to Dr. Harvey Karp, Happiest Baby’s Founder and CEO.  Congratulations to Happiest Baby and all of the semi-finalists! NSF is already looking forward to the  innovations that 2018’s  entrants will bring to the next SleepTech® Award. To learn more or receive award application updates, please contact Jessica Wurzer, Sleep Technology & Education Coordinator at jwurzer@sleepfoundation.org or 703-243-1753.   Feb 14, 2018 | Setting the Standard It is a great time to be at the intersection of sleep and technology. This innovative  space requires smart and strategic partnerships in order to address critical trends in innovation, globalization and regulation.  An exciting example of collaboration is NSF’s work with the Consumer Technology Association and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). In September, 2017 CTA and NSF announced a new standard for measuring sleep cycles with wearables and other applications. The new standard expands on 2016’s work that defined terms and functionality required for sleep measuring devices.   Since 2014, the R6.4 WG1 Sleep Monitors group has brought  together sleep experts and technology manufacturers to develop standards for sleep technology. To date, the working group has 42 members, including Apple, Beddit, Fitbit, and Qualcomm Inc. Click here to read the official press release about the latest standards. SleepTech® Network Landing Page
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March 21, 2019  ReST® (Responsive Surface Technology) Performance and Timeshifter® Win National Sleep Foundation SleepTech® Awards

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) announces the winners of the 2019 SleepTech Awards. These awards recognize innovative sleep technology companies. Twenty-eight semi-finalists pitched their product to a panel of judges in front of a live audience at Sleep Show® in Houston, Texas on March 9th.  Five finalists were selected from this group. 

The ReST Bed™, which senses a sleeper's position and makes automatic real-time adjustments, won the 2019 SleepTech Award. Timeshifter - The Jet Lag App® based on sleep and circadian neuroscience research won the 2019 SleepTech App Award.

Congratulations to ReST, Timeshifter, and all of the semi-finalists! NSF can’t wait to showcase more exciting innovations next year. To learn more or receive application updates, please contact jwurzer@sleepfoundation.org
 

Feb 14, 2018 | And the Winner Is...

In 2017, the National Sleep Foundation launched the world’s first innovation award for sleep technology. With so many companies developing exciting new technologies, NSF believes it is time to formally recognize these innovations. 

The 18 unique semi-finalists pitched their products to an expert panel of judges at the third annual SleepTech® Summit co-located with the 2017 Health 2.0 Fall Conference. Happiest Baby’s SNOO Smart Sleeper was named the winner!

SNOO features adjustable and automated rocking motions, white noise generation, and a variety of safety and comfort features with the aim of helping babies sleep longer and better The award was presented to Dr. Harvey Karp, Happiest Baby’s Founder and CEO. 

Congratulations to Happiest Baby and all of the semi-finalists! NSF is already looking forward to the  innovations that 2018’s  entrants will bring to the next SleepTech® Award. To learn more or receive award application updates, please contact Jessica Wurzer, Sleep Technology & Education Coordinator at jwurzer@sleepfoundation.org or 703-243-1753.

 

Feb 14, 2018 | Setting the Standard

It is a great time to be at the intersection of sleep and technology. This innovative  space requires smart and strategic partnerships in order to address critical trends in innovation, globalization and regulation. 

An exciting example of collaboration is NSF’s work with the Consumer Technology Association and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). In September, 2017 CTA and NSF announced a new standard for measuring sleep cycles with wearables and other applications. The new standard expands on 2016’s work that defined terms and functionality required for sleep measuring devices.  

Since 2014, the R6.4 WG1 Sleep Monitors group has brought  together sleep experts and technology manufacturers to develop standards for sleep technology. To date, the working group has 42 members, including Apple, Beddit, Fitbit, and Qualcomm Inc.

Click here to read the official press release about the latest standards.

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Christine National Sleep Foundation
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/bedroom-environment/taste/food-and-sleep Food and Sleep 2018-10-29T17:25:41.000-05:00 Image Taste Home Food and Sleep Yes, there are certain foods that could promote better sleep, but the best choice overall is to eat lightly before bed (if at all) and avoid alcohol or stimulants like caffeine. Save larger, protein-rich meals for breakfast and lunch when your body needs the daytime energy. The connection between food and sleep is complex. You know that what you eat affects your sleep, but did you know that the reverse is also true? Studies now show that people who are sleep deprived tend to eat more fat-rich foods, simple carbohydrates, and fewer vegetables, possibly because sleep loss alters chemical signals connected to metabolism and hunger. In fact, some researchers believe sleep deprivation to be a factor in the rising rates of obesity. Eating and sleeping well are two vital components of health that are tied in surprising ways. Supporting Research Sleep restriction leads to increased activation in brain regions sensitive to food stimuli Acute partial sleep deprivation The Bedroom Environment Landing Page
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sleep foundation touch

Taste

  1. Home

Food and Sleep

Yes, there are certain foods that could promote better sleep, but the best choice overall is to eat lightly before bed (if at all) and avoid alcohol or stimulants like caffeine. Save larger, protein-rich meals for breakfast and lunch when your body needs the daytime energy.

The connection between food and sleep is complex. You know that what you eat affects your sleep, but did you know that the reverse is also true? Studies now show that people who are sleep deprived tend to eat more fat-rich foods, simple carbohydrates, and fewer vegetables, possibly because sleep loss alters chemical signals connected to metabolism and hunger. In fact, some researchers believe sleep deprivation to be a factor in the rising rates of obesity. Eating and sleeping well are two vital components of health that are tied in surprising ways.

Supporting Research

Sleep restriction leads to increased activation in brain regions sensitive to food stimuli

Acute partial sleep deprivation

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azra National Sleep Foundation
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/bedroom-environment/taste/how-food-and-drink-affect-your-sleep How Food and Drink Affect Your Sleep 2018-10-29T17:23:30.000-05:00 Image Taste Home How Food and Drink Affect Your Sleep What you eat and drink before bed can affect your sleep. For example, foods containing the amino acid tryptophan—a building block of the sleep-related chemical serotonin—could potentially make you drowsy, although evidence is mixed as to whether the amount in food is enough to change your sleep. Turkey is a well-known tryptophan source (and notorious cause of the post-Thanksgiving nap), but turkey is not unique. Other foods such as eggs, chicken, fish, and nuts contain roughly equal amounts of tryptophan. Carbohydrates make tryptophan more available to the brain, so if you're eating a light snack before bed, you might try something like a few whole wheat crackers with a small amount of peanut butter, or cereal with milk. On the other hand, foods that tax or upset your stomach, such as fatty, fried, or spicy foods, are best avoided before sleep. Alcohol might make you drowsy and help you fall asleep, but it can actually make it harder to sleep deeply and continuously throughout the night and should be avoided in the hours before bed. As you know, caffeine is a stimulant and it's effect on the body lasts many hours, so it is best not to consume it after the mid-afternoon. The Bedroom Environment Landing Page
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sleep foundation touch

Taste

  1. Home

How Food and Drink Affect Your Sleep

What you eat and drink before bed can affect your sleep. For example, foods containing the amino acid tryptophan—a building block of the sleep-related chemical serotonin—could potentially make you drowsy, although evidence is mixed as to whether the amount in food is enough to change your sleep. Turkey is a well-known tryptophan source (and notorious cause of the post-Thanksgiving nap), but turkey is not unique. Other foods such as eggs, chicken, fish, and nuts contain roughly equal amounts of tryptophan. Carbohydrates make tryptophan more available to the brain, so if you're eating a light snack before bed, you might try something like a few whole wheat crackers with a small amount of peanut butter, or cereal with milk. On the other hand, foods that tax or upset your stomach, such as fatty, fried, or spicy foods, are best avoided before sleep.

Alcohol might make you drowsy and help you fall asleep, but it can actually make it harder to sleep deeply and continuously throughout the night and should be avoided in the hours before bed. As you know, caffeine is a stimulant and it's effect on the body lasts many hours, so it is best not to consume it after the mid-afternoon.

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azra National Sleep Foundation
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/bedroom-environment/smell/fresh-sheets-better-sleep Fresh Sheets for Better Sleep 2018-10-29T17:21:04.000-05:00 Image Smell Home Fresh Sheets for Better Sleep In a recent Bedroom Poll by the National Sleep Foundation, more than three fourths of people said they are more excited to go to bed when the sheets have a fresh scent, and roughly three quarters of people say they get a more comfortable night's sleep on sheets with fresh scent. Try to wash your sheets and pillowcases once a week, and keep a good quality spare set to use while the others are being cleaned. Find a laundry detergent with a smell that is pleasing to you, or no smell at all if you prefer. You may also want to do some upkeep on your mattress and pillows to freshen the smell and feel of your bed: wash your mattress cover in hot water and try cleaning the surface of your mattress with an upholstery cleaner or sprinkle baking soda to draw out moisture and vacuum it the next day. Most pillows can be washed as well. Keeping your sleep surfaces clean, with a pleasing scent, may make the bedroom more inviting and help your body relax and sleep peacefully. Supporting Research National Sleep Foundation Bedroom Poll The Bedroom Environment Landing Page
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Fresh Sheets for Better Sleep

In a recent Bedroom Poll by the National Sleep Foundation, more than three fourths of people said they are more excited to go to bed when the sheets have a fresh scent, and roughly three quarters of people say they get a more comfortable night's sleep on sheets with fresh scent.

Try to wash your sheets and pillowcases once a week, and keep a good quality spare set to use while the others are being cleaned. Find a laundry detergent with a smell that is pleasing to you, or no smell at all if you prefer. You may also want to do some upkeep on your mattress and pillows to freshen the smell and feel of your bed: wash your mattress cover in hot water and try cleaning the surface of your mattress with an upholstery cleaner or sprinkle baking soda to draw out moisture and vacuum it the next day. Most pillows can be washed as well. Keeping your sleep surfaces clean, with a pleasing scent, may make the bedroom more inviting and help your body relax and sleep peacefully.

Supporting Research

National Sleep Foundation Bedroom Poll

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azra National Sleep Foundation
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323318.php Causes and home remedies for toe cramps 2018-10-11T12:00:00.000-05:00 Toe cramps can have a variety of causes, including poor-fitting shoes, nerve damage, and arthritis. Learn more about the causes of toe cramps and how to treat them here. Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) https://myapnea.org/blog/how-to-get-your-brain-back How to Get Your Brain Back 2018-10-03T23:00:00.000-05:00 <p>One of the most difficult things about suffering from many years with undiagnosed and untreated sleep apnea (SA) is the serious co-morbidities that came with it. People with long-term undiagnosed sleep apnea can suffer from several related diseases: cardiovascular disease or even congestive heart failure, type 2 diabetes, strokes, other sleep disturbances, and many other problems including cognitive and memory impairments. Cognitive deficits can cost undiagnosed patients their careers, financial stability, mental health or sense of well-being, and their marriages. </p> <p>I was misdiagnosed for almost thirty years after I started seeking medical help. I probably suffered from some degree of SA all my life and, looking back, I think many of my family members did to. But this blog post isn&rsquo;t about my long difficult journey to self-diagnosis and treatment. Rather, I want to talk about the next step in my journey: <strong>How I Got My Brain Back.</strong></p> <p>Several months into successful PAP treatment, I was suffering &ldquo;blackouts&rdquo;, or unaccounted periods of time (and I don&rsquo;t drink). These were particularly concerning because I was living alone and traveling alone for work. There were NO warning signs and I only recognized blackouts after the fact. I underwent several days of neurological and neuro-psychological testing, but I was misdiagnosed, which actually did some harm. </p> <p>I concluded I would have to help myself. I ordered literally dozens of books on SA, neurology and related issues. It was difficult to read, given my severely impaired brain, but I was desperate and determined. I learned about neuroplasticity and neurogenesis and how I could rebuild my brain. I learned that there were Parkinson patients who had kept the ravages of Parkinson&rsquo;s at bay through their own efforts to foster neurogenesis.</p> <h3>What I Did and Why</h3> <p>I followed up with the Parkinson&rsquo;s formula. I did exercise that moves the body through space. I also took efforts to learn new things and stimulate my brain. For two years, here&rsquo;s what I did, step by step. </p> <p><strong>1: Exercise</strong> In my reading, I found that the only thing that everyone agreed would foster neurogenesis was exercise, particularly exercise that involved moving your body through space. Ballroom dancing is a great one, but there are many others. I went to the gym every day for six months straight. EVERY SINGLE DAY. And I am as FAR from a gym rat as a person can get. This was an act of sheer will. I went from water aerobics to the track, to spinning, etc. After six months of that I saw my PCP and she said, &ldquo;WHAT happened to you?&rdquo; Meaning: you look like a different person. </p> <p><strong>2: Learn Something NEW</strong> Two great options here are to learn a new language or new instrument. The emphasis is the novelty. A language or instrument that you are already familiar with won&rsquo;t do. I took up Italian and the acoustic guitar!</p> <p><strong>3: Do Puzzles</strong> There are all kinds of fun puzzles out there to pick from to keep the brain stimulated: logic and math puzzles, sudoku, crosswords, cryptograms, and so on. I renewed my interest in doing puzzles, which had lagged when my SA was undiagnosed. </p> <p><strong>4: Use Your Treatment (relentlessly!)</strong> My first rule was to never, EVER sleep without PAP. It wouldn&rsquo;t do much good to be developing new neurons if I was simultaneously losing neurons to hypoxia (lack of oxygen). Accordingly, I arranged for battery backups for my machine during power outages. I took it with me when I traveled. I never napped without it. My partner had orders to never let me fall asleep in front of the TV or otherwise without the PAP mask on my face and the machine turned on. And I did the same for him. I was fanatic about this. I also refused to take a sleep study without PAP. Since I obstruct about 83 times an hour during REM, and I desaturate to 60 or below routinely, I felt it was life threatening for me. </p> <h3>The Test</h3> <p>After about 2 years, I put myself to a test. By way of background, I believe that SA caused me to lose my homing pigeon worthy sense of direction. I had always known exactly where I was spatially and now I didn&rsquo;t. I really missed that capability. So, after two years of hard work, I did a test to see if my lost sense of direction had improved: I drove up the coast of Connecticut to a string of small coastal towns right off I-95. One after another, I drove out to the beach in each town and, without using a GPS or map, retraced my steps back to I-95, and went on to the next coastal town. When I had successfully done that with about 7 towns, I concluded that to a certain degree, I had succeeded in rebuilding my brain. </p> <h3>Sharing Solutions</h3> <p>There is no doubt that many other motivated patients have done things to get back their mental or physical abilities back after treatment for SA. This is my story, but I want to hear more about what has worked for others. If we could share these techniques, we could help patient still struggling with the same issues. This is particularly important because the medical establishment has yet to address this important part of SA treatment and recovery. </p> <p><strong>Please share your approach to &lsquo;Getting Your Brain Back&rsquo; in the comments section below.</strong> Then, as a group, we can learn what works and help each other get moving forward! </p> <p><em>This article was written by Sarah Gorman, a current member of the MyApnea Multi-Stakeholder Engagement Panel.</em></p> One of the most difficult things about suffering from many years with undiagnosed and untreated sleep apnea (SA) is the serious co-morbidities that came with it. People with long-term undiagnosed sleep apnea can suffer from several related diseases: cardiovascular disease or even congestive heart failure, type 2 diabetes, strokes, other sleep disturbances, and many other problems including cognitive and memory impairments. Cognitive deficits can cost undiagnosed patients their careers, financial stability, mental health or sense of well-being, and their marriages.

I was misdiagnosed for almost thirty years after I started seeking medical help. I probably suffered from some degree of SA all my life and, looking back, I think many of my family members did to. But this blog post isn’t about my long difficult journey to self-diagnosis and treatment. Rather, I want to talk about the next step in my journey: How I Got My Brain Back.

Several months into successful PAP treatment, I was suffering “blackouts”, or unaccounted periods of time (and I don’t drink). These were particularly concerning because I was living alone and traveling alone for work. There were NO warning signs and I only recognized blackouts after the fact. I underwent several days of neurological and neuro-psychological testing, but I was misdiagnosed, which actually did some harm.

I concluded I would have to help myself. I ordered literally dozens of books on SA, neurology and related issues. It was difficult to read, given my severely impaired brain, but I was desperate and determined. I learned about neuroplasticity and neurogenesis and how I could rebuild my brain. I learned that there were Parkinson patients who had kept the ravages of Parkinson’s at bay through their own efforts to foster neurogenesis.

What I Did and Why

I followed up with the Parkinson’s formula. I did exercise that moves the body through space. I also took efforts to learn new things and stimulate my brain. For two years, here’s what I did, step by step.

1: Exercise In my reading, I found that the only thing that everyone agreed would foster neurogenesis was exercise, particularly exercise that involved moving your body through space. Ballroom dancing is a great one, but there are many others. I went to the gym every day for six months straight. EVERY SINGLE DAY. And I am as FAR from a gym rat as a person can get. This was an act of sheer will. I went from water aerobics to the track, to spinning, etc. After six months of that I saw my PCP and she said, “WHAT happened to you?” Meaning: you look like a different person.

2: Learn Something NEW Two great options here are to learn a new language or new instrument. The emphasis is the novelty. A language or instrument that you are already familiar with won’t do. I took up Italian and the acoustic guitar!

3: Do Puzzles There are all kinds of fun puzzles out there to pick from to keep the brain stimulated: logic and math puzzles, sudoku, crosswords, cryptograms, and so on. I renewed my interest in doing puzzles, which had lagged when my SA was undiagnosed.

4: Use Your Treatment (relentlessly!) My first rule was to never, EVER sleep without PAP. It wouldn’t do much good to be developing new neurons if I was simultaneously losing neurons to hypoxia (lack of oxygen). Accordingly, I arranged for battery backups for my machine during power outages. I took it with me when I traveled. I never napped without it. My partner had orders to never let me fall asleep in front of the TV or otherwise without the PAP mask on my face and the machine turned on. And I did the same for him. I was fanatic about this. I also refused to take a sleep study without PAP. Since I obstruct about 83 times an hour during REM, and I desaturate to 60 or below routinely, I felt it was life threatening for me.

The Test

After about 2 years, I put myself to a test. By way of background, I believe that SA caused me to lose my homing pigeon worthy sense of direction. I had always known exactly where I was spatially and now I didn’t. I really missed that capability. So, after two years of hard work, I did a test to see if my lost sense of direction had improved: I drove up the coast of Connecticut to a string of small coastal towns right off I-95. One after another, I drove out to the beach in each town and, without using a GPS or map, retraced my steps back to I-95, and went on to the next coastal town. When I had successfully done that with about 7 towns, I concluded that to a certain degree, I had succeeded in rebuilding my brain.

Sharing Solutions

There is no doubt that many other motivated patients have done things to get back their mental or physical abilities back after treatment for SA. This is my story, but I want to hear more about what has worked for others. If we could share these techniques, we could help patient still struggling with the same issues. This is particularly important because the medical establishment has yet to address this important part of SA treatment and recovery.

Please share your approach to ‘Getting Your Brain Back’ in the comments section below. Then, as a group, we can learn what works and help each other get moving forward!

This article was written by Sarah Gorman, a current member of the MyApnea Multi-Stakeholder Engagement Panel.

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RebeccaR My Apnea
https://myapnea.org/blog/losing-sleep-sleep-apnea-and-heart-health Losing Sleep: Sleep Apnea and Heart Health 2018-08-13T23:00:00.000-05:00 Could disrupted sleep be affecting your heart health? Excerpt of an article written by Kim Olson and originally published by HeartBeat Magazine.

In October 2004, John Vosberg called his girlfriend, Dianne, to cancel their date. “I won’t be able to see you this weekend. I’m in St. Cloud Hospital. I had a heart attack.”

John had arrived at the hospital just in time to save his life. Some arterial plaque had ruptured, blocking an artery, and a stent was inserted to hold the vessel open.

Eight years later, Dianne — now John’s wife — urged him to see a doctor about a different issue: his snoring and daytime sleepiness. “On my drive to work, I struggled to stay awake,” says John, who lives in Pine City, Minnesota, and is an active member of Mended Hearts Chapter 10 out of St. Cloud (the “Granite City Beaters”). While watching evening television, he needed a “pre-bed nap.”

John underwent an overnight sleep study that measured his brain waves, eye movements, blood oxygen levels, breathing, heart rate and blood pressure. Two hours into the test, an attendant noted that John had severe sleep apnea, interruptions in his breathing during sleep. She connected him to a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine, which delivers a constant stream of air through a facemask. “I couldn’t believe how much better I felt in the morning,” he says.

Later, while visiting his doctor to get his own CPAP machine, John joked, “There are only two ways that I’m leaving here: with my machine or a police escort.” He ultimately received a heart transplant in 2016. Now 61 years old, his new heart and CPAP machine have given him a new lease on life.

The heart connection: John’s sleep apnea and heart disease may seem unrelated, but experts suspect a connection...

Read the full article to learn more. MyApnea researcher, Dr. Redline, explains the connection between sleep apnea and heart health and talks about what the MyApnea community is doing to help!

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RebeccaR My Apnea
https://myapnea.org/blog/should-sleep-tests-happen-at-home-or-in-the-lab Should Sleep Tests Happen at Home or in the Lab? 2018-07-15T23:00:00.000-05:00 New findings about patient satisfaction with sleep tests reveal that our previous assumptions may need to be revisited Patients can be diagnosed with sleep apnea at home using a home sleep apnea test (HSAT) or in the sleep lab with polysomnography (PSG). Several studies have found that medically uncomplicated patients at high risk of obstructive sleep apnea that get diagnosed either way have similar CPAP adherence and patient-reported outcomes. For this reason, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends that either method can be used in these types of patients.

A team of MyApnea researchers and patients wanted to learn more about this topic. In a structured research setting, patients do well with both types of diagnostic tests. But what about in the real world? Are patients equally satisfied with both options?

The surveys you complete here at MyApnea.Org ask about your experience getting diagnosed and treated outside a structured research setting, in the real world. Survey responses were analyzed from 2563 MyApnea members regarding satisfaction with sleep study experience. The results of these surveys showed that patients who had their studies in-lab were more likely to be satisfied with their experience than patients who had a home sleep test. Specifically, 71% of patients who had their studies in-lab were satisfied with their experience versus 60% of patients who had a home sleep tests. These new results suggest that the comparison of in-lab PSG to home-based tests needs to be re-examined. More “real-world” studies assessing patient preferences and satisfaction regarding sleep apnea care are needed. You can read more about these published research findings.

The MyApnea research team wants to thank you for your contribution. We were able to learn something new about sleep apnea diagnosis because you completed the research surveys. Together, we are helping the sleep apnea community continue to learn and improve. Our research team just launched new surveys. Contribute to new research today by visiting the research page!

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RebeccaR My Apnea
https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30198-9/fulltext?rss=yes Editorial Board 2018-06-30T19:00:00.000-05:00 Sleep Medicine https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30276-4/fulltext?rss=yes Dissociable effects of sleep deprivation on functional connectivity in the dorsal and ventral default mode networks 2018-06-22T19:00:00.000-05:00 Wen-Hao Chen, Jie Chen, Xiao Lin, Peng Li, Le Shi, Jia-Jia Liu, Hong-Qiang Sun, Lin Lu, Jie Shi Sleep Medicine http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/06/22/many-in-u-s-have-confidence-in-what-private-space-companies-will-accomplish/ Many in U.S. have confidence in what private space companies will accomplish 2018-06-22T06:00:36.000-05:00 Brian Kennedy;Mark Strauss Pew Research Center | Sleep http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/06/21/the-news-that-bots-share-on-twitter-tends-not-to-focus-on-politics/ The news that bots share on Twitter tends not to focus on politics 2018-06-21T12:01:47.000-05:00 Stefan Wojcik;Michael Barthel Pew Research Center | Sleep http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/06/21/differing-views-of-immigrants-pose-a-test-for-germanys-coalition-government/ Differing views of immigrants pose a test for Germany’s coalition government 2018-06-21T11:00:13.000-05:00 Bruce Stokes Pew Research Center | Sleep http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/06/21/key-findings-on-the-global-rise-in-religious-restrictions/ Key findings on the global rise in religious restrictions 2018-06-21T09:03:08.000-05:00 Katayoun Kishi Pew Research Center | Sleep http://www.pewforum.org/2018/06/21/global-uptick-in-government-restrictions-on-religion-in-2016 Global Uptick in Government Restrictions on Religion in 2016 2018-06-21T08:59:20.000-05:00 Pew Research Center Staff Pew Research Center | Sleep http://www.people-press.org/2018/06/20/voters-more-focused-on-control-of-congress-and-the-president-than-in-past-midterms/ Voters More Focused on Control of Congress – and the President – Than in Past Midterms 2018-06-20T13:07:09.000-05:00 Pew Research Center Staff Pew Research Center | Sleep http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/06/20/trump-mueller-probe/ Most Americans lack confidence in Trump to deal appropriately with Mueller probe 2018-06-20T13:02:21.000-05:00 Alec Tyson Pew Research Center | Sleep https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30270-3/fulltext?rss=yes Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to understand the prevalence of restless legs syndrome in multiple sclerosis: An update 2018-06-19T19:00:00.000-05:00 Pingping Ning, Fayun Hu, Baiyuan Yang, Qiuyan Shen, Quanzhen Zhao, Hongyan Huang, Ran An, Yalan Chen, Hui Wang, Xinglong Yang, Yanming Xu Sleep Medicine http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/06/19/family-life-is-changing-in-different-ways-across-urban-suburban-and-rural-communities-in-the-u-s/ Family life is changing in different ways across urban, suburban and rural communities in the U.S. 2018-06-19T12:01:52.000-05:00 Gretchen Livingston Pew Research Center | Sleep http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/06/19/western-europeans-vary-in-their-nationalist-anti-immigrant-and-anti-religious-minority-attitudes/ Western Europeans vary in their nationalist, anti-immigrant and anti-religious minority attitudes 2018-06-19T11:01:58.000-05:00 Jeff Diamant;Kelsey Jo Starr Pew Research Center | Sleep http://www.pewglobal.org/2018/06/19/social-media-use-continues-to-rise-in-developing-countries-but-plateaus-across-developed-ones/#table Explore global rates of internet use, smartphone ownership and social media use over time 2018-06-19T09:00:17.000-05:00 No Author Pew Research Center | Sleep https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30267-3/fulltext?rss=yes Trends of cost-effectiveness studies in sleep medicine 2018-06-14T19:00:00.000-05:00 Babak Mohit, Joshua T. Cohen Sleep Medicine https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30269-7/fulltext?rss=yes Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for pharmacotherapy-resistant chronic insomnia: a multi-center randomized controlled trial in Japan 2018-06-14T19:00:00.000-05:00 Naoko Ayabe, Isa Okajima, Shun Nakajima, Yuichi Inoue, Norio Watanabe, Wataru Yamadera, Naohisa Uchimura, Hisateru Tachimori, Yuichi Kamei, Kazuo Mishima Sleep Medicine https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30226-0/fulltext?rss=yes Sleep-Related Erection Neurophysiology: A Journey of Discovery 2018-06-13T19:00:00.000-05:00 Markus H. Schmidt Sleep Medicine https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30255-7/fulltext?rss=yes Validating the Persian Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale-Revised (ASHSr) using comprehensive psychometric testing methods 2018-06-11T19:00:00.000-05:00 Chung-Ying Lin, Carol Strong, Andrew M.H. Siu, Shabnam Jalilolghadr, Per Nilsen, Anders Broström, Amir H. Pakpour Sleep Medicine https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30216-8/fulltext?rss=yes Sleep disturbances and sleep disorders in adults living with chronic pain: A meta-analysis 2018-06-10T19:00:00.000-05:00 J.L. Mathias, M.L. Cant, A.L.J. Burke Sleep Medicine https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30159-X/fulltext?rss=yes Association between mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and cognitive dysfunction in children 2018-06-08T19:00:00.000-05:00 Jing Zhao, Shujing Han, Jishui Zhang, Guixiang Wang, Hua Wang, Zhifei Xu, Jun Tai, Xiaoxia Peng, Yongli Guo, Haihong Liu, Jinghong Tian, Xin Jin, Li Zheng, Jie Zhang, Xin Ni Sleep Medicine https://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457(18)30224-7/fulltext?rss=yes The mysteries of sleep and waking unveiled by Michel Jouvet 2018-06-05T19:00:00.000-05:00 Barbara E. Jones Sleep Medicine https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsy096/4995737?rss=1 Emergence of Mature Cortical Activity in Wakefulness and Sleep in Healthy Pre-term and Full-term Infants 2018-05-13T19:00:00.000-05:00 Oxford Academic - Open Access https://sleep.org/articles/how-to-sleep-with-a-snorer/ How To Sleep With A Snorer 2018-05-01T21:20:28.000-05:00 Tim Ferman Sleep.org https://sleep.org/articles/sleep-apnea-affecting-daily-life/ Is Sleep Apnea Affecting Your Daily Life? 2018-05-01T20:36:28.000-05:00 Tim Ferman Sleep.org https://sleep.org/articles/is-snoring-genetic/ Is Snoring Genetic? 2018-05-01T20:25:15.000-05:00 Tim Ferman Sleep.org https://sleep.org/articles/the-how-to-guide-for-earplugs/ The How-to Guide for Earplugs 2018-05-01T13:41:50.000-05:00 Tim Ferman Sleep.org https://sleep.org/articles/5-lifestyle-changes-reduce-snoring/ 5 Lifestyle Changes That Reduce Snoring 2018-05-01T13:24:41.000-05:00 Tim Ferman Sleep.org https://sleep.org/articles/men-snore-women/ Do Men Snore More Than Women? 2018-05-01T12:53:14.000-05:00 Tim Ferman Sleep.org https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsy049/4956860?rss=1 Sleep characteristics and inflammatory biomarkers among midlife women 2018-03-29T19:00:00.000-05:00 Oxford Academic - Editor's Choice https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsy046/4924327?rss=1 The Inappropriate Occurrence of REM Sleep in Narcolepsy is not due to a Defect in Homeostatic Regulation of REM Sleep 2018-03-06T18:00:00.000-06:00 Oxford Academic - Editor's Choice http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=229 A Case of Restless Legs Syndrome in Patient with Neurogenic Sciatic Nerve Tumor 2017-12-30T17:00:01.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=230 A Case of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure ... 2017-12-30T17:00:01.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=225 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: A Review of the Treatment Effects on Suicide 2017-12-30T17:00:01.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=227 Differential Effect of Light Emitting Diode Light on Electroencephalographic Oscillations in ... 2017-12-30T17:00:01.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=226 Dream Recall Frequency and Sleep in Patients with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder 2017-12-30T17:00:01.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=228 A Case of Re-Emergent Sleepwalking in Adulthood, Primed by Sleep Deprivation and Triggered by ... 2017-12-30T17:00:01.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=231 A Sleepy Man with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease-Obstructive Sleep Apnea Overlap Syndrome 2017-12-30T17:00:01.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=233 Comparison of Health Related Quality of Life between Type I and Type II Narcolepsy Patients 2017-12-30T17:00:01.000-06:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine https://sleep.org/articles/will-a-sound-machine/ Will a Sound Machine Help You Drift Off? 2017-08-03T09:39:14.000-05:00 ashelton Sleep.org https://sleep.org/articles/nap-studio-right-for-you/ Is a Nap Studio Right for You? 2017-08-03T00:47:20.000-05:00 ashelton Sleep.org https://sleep.org/articles/use-your-five-senses-better-sleep/ Use Your 5 Senses to Set Yourself Up For Better Sleep 2017-08-03T00:25:50.000-05:00 ashelton Sleep.org https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318377.php Does having a purpose in life help you sleep better? 2017-07-15T02:00:00.000-05:00 Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=219 Overview of Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults 2017-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine http://www.e-jsm.org/journal/view.php?number=221 A Twenty-Minute Nap Boosts the Planning Domain of Executive Function in Sleep Deprived Late ... 2017-06-29T18:00:01.000-05:00 Journal of Sleep Medicine https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317911.php Periodic limb movement disorder: Symptoms and treatment 2017-06-14T02:00:00.000-05:00 Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) https://sleep.org/articles/yoga-moves-quiet-brain-relax-body/ Yoga Moves That Quiet the Brain and Relax the Body 2017-05-03T11:36:04.000-05:00 ashelton Sleep.org https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/315393.php Eight Natural Remedies for Fibromyalgia 2017-01-23T07:00:00.000-06:00 Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/315277.php Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain 2017-01-17T01:00:00.000-06:00 Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314967.php Barrel Chest: Causes and Treatment 2017-01-03T01:00:00.000-06:00 Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314852.php Sleep disruption has genetic links with obesity, schizophrenia 2016-12-20T08:00:00.000-06:00 Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2016/12040/You_Ask__We_Answer___Is_Parkinson_s_disease.18.aspx You Ask. We Answer: Is Parkinson's disease associated with sleep apnea? 2016-08-04T08:02:26.000-05:00 NeurologyNow https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/311276.php Foot wrap shows promise as drug-free option to treat restless legs syndrome 2016-06-28T09:00:00.000-05:00 Medical News Today - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2016/12020/Sleep_Smarter__For_people_with_neurologic.25.aspx Sleep Smarter: For people with neurologic conditions, sleep can be elusive. We troubleshoot six obstacles to a healthy night's rest. 2016-06-15T05:37:20.000-05:00 NeurologyNow https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2016/12010/Weighty_Matters__Obesity_has_been_linked_to.22.aspx Weighty Matters: Obesity has been linked to neurologic problems such as migraine, dementia, and sleep apnea. Our experts review the evidence and offer advice for getting weight under control. 2016-02-08T09:45:46.000-06:00 NeurologyNow https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2015/11040/Rest,_Assured__Experts_say_improving_sleep_habits.17.aspx Rest, Assured: Experts say improving sleep habits is better for insomnia than sleeping pills. 2015-08-06T06:16:19.000-05:00 NeurologyNow https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2015/11030/Sleep_Thief__Restless_legs_syndrome_disrupts_more.19.aspx Sleep Thief: Restless legs syndrome disrupts more than sleep—it has been linked to heart disease and diabetes, too. Here's how to get the condition under control. 2015-06-12T06:18:05.000-05:00 NeurologyNow https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2015/11020/Quick_Tips__Sleep_WiseAvoid_the_health_risks_of.10.aspx Quick Tips: Sleep WiseAvoid the health risks of sleep apnea with this expert advice. 2015-04-09T07:04:43.000-05:00 NeurologyNow https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2015/11010/Quick_Tips__3_Questions_for_Top_Sleep_DocsWith.13.aspx Quick Tips: 3 Questions for Top Sleep DocsWith Sleep Awareness Week around the corner, we asked sleep experts to answer the questions that keep our readers awake at night. 2015-02-05T05:07:00.000-06:00 NeurologyNow https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2014/10010/Sleep_Well__Could_getting_more_high_quality_sleep.24.aspx Sleep Well: Could getting more high-quality sleep protect the brain? 2014-12-15T04:24:32.000-06:00 NeurologyNow https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2014/10030/The_Editor_Responds__Sleep_Apnea.3.aspx The Editor Responds: Sleep Apnea 2014-06-10T10:50:17.000-05:00 NeurologyNow https://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2014/10030/Sleep_Apnea.2.aspx Sleep Apnea 2014-06-10T10:49:50.000-05:00 NeurologyNow http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2648 Sleep apnea treatment improves sleep partner's depression 2011-10-11T00:00:00.000-05:00 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2635 Obstructive sleep apnea treatment improves body’s ability to fight acid reflux 2011-10-06T00:00:00.000-05:00 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2634 Sleep apnea disguised as dementia 2011-10-06T00:00:00.000-05:00 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2633 Doctors combine CPAP treatment with oral appliance therapy 2011-10-06T00:00:00.000-05:00 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2632 Putting a name to sleep apnea 2011-10-06T00:00:00.000-05:00 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2631 Chinese anesthesiologists score low on OSA knowledge 2011-10-06T00:00:00.000-05:00 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2630 Heavyweights tag-teamed by sleep apnea's partners 2011-10-06T00:00:00.000-05:00 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2629 Reversing infertility with sleep apnea treatment 2011-10-05T00:00:00.000-05:00 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2607 The ABC's of Snoring and Childhood Cognition 2011-09-29T00:00:00.000-05:00 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine http://www.aadsm.org/articles.aspx?id=2597 Gotta Go? 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